10-18hp Kohler (or Carter [model N]) CarburetorInformation about the Kohler Carburetor, Various Fuels and Fuel Systems

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Identification of Carter and Kohler Carburetors -

Carburetors that's used on Kohler engine models K90 (3.6hp), K91 (4hp), K141 (6¼hp), K160 (6.6hp), K161 (7hp) and K181/M8 (8hp) are as follows:

FYI - The Carter Carburetor Corporation sold out to Kohler Engines sometime before 1984. Kohler redesigned the throttle shaft lever on the #26 and #30 single cylinder engine carburetors and made slots in the mounting holes for easier installation and removal. Everything else is the same on the Carter and Kohler carburetors, and with the exception of the throttle shaft/lever, they use the same parts. Anyway, Carter, and then later Kohler, made six types of carburetors for the K-series single cylinder 10hp through 18hp engines, the KT-series opposed twin cylinder engines and the K482, K532 and K582 engines. NOTE: Please don't discard your Carter or Kohler carburetor core. These are no longer made and are considered valuable nowadays. If not rebuildable, maybe the parts can be used on a good core.

The differences between the Carter (#26, #28, #30) and Kohler (#26, #30) carburetors

The size number (diameter of throttle bore) for the Carter or Kohler carburetors is embossed inside the upper part of the choke end, just above the venturi. But not all Kohler carburetors have a number embossed. In this case, the throttle bore (throttle plate area) will need to be measured to determine the size of the carburetor. The size number refers to the amount of air that can flow through the carburetor. A #26 carburetor has a 26 millimeter diameter throttle bore, which converts closely to 1.024 inches (26 ÷ 25.4 = 1.024"), but actually measures 1.07". A #28 carburetor has a 28 millimeter diameter throttle bore, which converts to 1.102 inches (28 ÷ 25.4 = 1.102"), but actually measures 1.17". And a #30 carburetor has a 30 millimeter diameter throttle bore, which converts to 1.181 inches (30 ÷ 25.4 = 1.181"), but actually measures 1.200". When measuring the throttle bore to determine the size, it's best to use a dial or digital caliper to be precise.

Carburetors that's used on Kohler engines are as follows:

  1. The first carburetor is a number "26". It was made by Carter, and then later Kohler. It has a 26mm or 1.07" diameter throttle bore. The venturi (smallest part of the throttle bore) measures .812" in diameter. It's designed to be used on models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K3303/K331 (12½hp), KT17, KT17II, KT19, KT19II, KT21, MV16, M18, MV18, M20 MV20, K482 and K532 engines. The carburetor for the single cylinder engines have been discontinued by Kohler. The replacement carburetor is a Walbro WHG #52. OEM Kohler part # 47 853 23-S.
  2. The next carburetor is a rare one, number "28". It was made by Carter, and used mainly on the model K321 (14hp) and on some K341 (16hp) engines. It has a 28mm or 1.17" diameter throttle bore. The venturi measures .937" in diameter. The carburetor may have the part number 236636 stamped into the flange. This carburetor have been discontinued by Kohler many years ago. The replacement is OEM Kohler part # 45 053 20-S. Which is the fully adjustable #30 Kohler carburetor. The Walbro WHG #60, #64 replacement is OEM Kohler part # 47 853 30-S.
  3. The third carburetor is a number "30". It was made by Carter, and then later Kohler. It was also used on the K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 (16hp) and K582 (23hp) engines. It has a 30 millimeter or 1.200" diameter throttle bore. The venturi measures 1.000" in diameter. This original fully adjustable Kohler carburetor for the K321/M14 (14hp) and K341/M16 (16hp) engines is still available under OEM Kohler part # 45 053 20-S. And the Walbro WHG #60, #64 replacement is OEM Kohler part # 47 853 30-S.
  4. There's also another type of Kohler #30 carburetor. The venturi in this carburetor measures 1.062" in diameter. Otherwise, it's identical in every other way to the #30 carburetor above È. It's used only on Kohler engine model K361 (18hp OHV). This carburetor is no longer available from Kohler. The carburetor for the K341 engine (Kohler part # 45 053 20-S), which have a venturi diameter of 1", can be used on the K361 engine, but the venturi will need to be bored to 1.062" so the K361 will produce full power at higher governored rpms. This is the only difference between the carburetors for these two engines.
  5. And yet there's another #26 type of Kohler carburetor designed for Kohler engine models K482 and K532. The throttle shaft is positioned horizontally and the idle fuel mixture screw is directly on top of the carburetor body instead of at an angle on the side. This carburetor is still available from Kohler.
  6. Finally, there's another #30 carburetor designed for the Kohler engine model K582. Like the carburetor above È, the throttle shaft is positioned horizontally and the idle fuel mixture screw is directly on top of the carburetor body instead of at an angle on the side. This carburetor have been discontinued by Kohler.

By the way - the part number for any particular Kohler-made carburetor is stamped on the right side of the mounting flange. Don't refer to the numbers just below the fuel inlet port. They represent nothing that I know of. Click here to identify a Kohler or Walbro carburetor and matching parts: Kohler Carburetor Reference Manual TP-2377-E.pdf. (Requires Adobe Acrobat Reader and use Google Chrome web browser for a faster download.) No numbers are available from any source for the Carter #26, #28 or #30 carburetors.

Airflow -

FYI - The throttle bore in the Carter or Kohler #26 carburetors can be bored to 1.2", the main jet/nozzle will still bottom out against the throttle bore, and of course, a 1.2" throttle shaft and plate would need to be used. But the boring process will break through the idle fuel mixing well (the idle progression holes and the welch plug hole). Modifications to this area would need to be made by threading in an 1/8" Allen pipe plug where the welch plug is (was), and drilling and installing a small brass or copper tube from the idle fuel mixture screw down into the float bowl, next to the float, with enough clearance so it won't interfere with the movement of the float. A 1/4-28 NF x 3/4" long bolt will also need to be installed where the high speed needle adjuster is (was) to block off a vacuum leak to will occur with the modifications of the idle fuel mixing well. Actually, it would be MUCH easier and less cost effective to just convert either a Carter or Kohler #28 or #30 carburetor for high-performance use and not having to do anything to modify the idle fuel passageway.

And boring of the venturi in the carburetor alone will not help to increase engine performance. To increase the overall airflow in and out of the combustion chamber for improved engine performance, and if sanctioning club's rules allow this, the intake (and exhaust) port runners must be enlarged, too. This is called "porting an engine." The [stock size] valves will also need to be reworked for more airflow. Or larger valves and a bigger cam will need to be installed.

For pulling competition, carburetor design and size depends on port sizes, valve sizes, if the intake valve and seat have 30°/31° angles and undercut heads, and the cam profile (lift and duration) is important. If an engine has stock ports, valves and cam, a plain stock carburetor can be used. But if the ports and valves have been reworked for more airflow, and a bigger cam is going to be used, then a bored-out carburetor with a 1" (.995" NQS legal) venturi can be used for best performance.

The 26mm carburetor obviously has a smaller throttle bore. Therefore, is restricted as to how much air can flow through it, even with the venturi removed. It'll work excellent on a hot 10hp or mild 12hp engine, but the larger 28mm and 30mm carburetors flows more air, 7.7% more for the 28mm, and 15.5% more for the 30mm. Which are ideal for a hot 12hp and larger engines with porting, polishing, bigger valves and a big cam. If you feel that using a single 30mm carburetor isn't enough for your particular engine, then either a "Super Carb," Dellorto, Mikuni, S&S Super D or a twin Kohler carburetor setup (on a "Y" intake) should be used.

If you have a 14hp Kohler engine, and you can't find a #28 or #30 carburetor, then a #26 carburetor will work just fine for general yard use. Personally, I ran a stock #26 on the 14hp engine that's on our 6,000 lb. self-propelled pulling sled for 10 years and the engine didn't lack any power whatsoever.


Identification and Information About Walbro WHG #52, #60 and #64 Carburetors -

The Walbro WHG #52, #60 and #64 carburetors originally come on all Magnum engines. These carburetors are direct replacements for the Kohler carburetors. The Walbro #52 carburetor has a throttle bore diameter of 1.07" and is designed for use on models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), KT17, KT17II, KT19, KT19II, KT21, MV16, M18, MV18, M20 and MV20 engines. And the Walbro #60 or #64 carburetor have a throttle bore diameter of 1.2" and is designed for the K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 (16hp) engines, and being the Kohler #30 carburetor that was originally designed for the K361, 18hp OHV engine is longer available, the only option is to use the Walbro #60 or #64 carburetor.

The older Walbro WHG #52, #60 and #64 carburetors are reliable and they seem to last a long time before requiring service. Most older Walbros are worth rebuilding, because the float valve seats are made of hardened solid bronze, which is actually harder than cast iron. They were manufactured back in the day when most business owners took pride in their products and offered their customers a quality product.

But the newer Walbro carburetors, especially the ones that come on recently-built aluminum block small air-cooled engines, are notorious for leaking gas after several years of use. Although overhaul/rebuild kits are available, it really does no good to rebuild them because the float valve seat is made of soft brass, which erodes with use due to microscopic pieces of dirt, grit and debris that pass through the fuel filter, and in most Walbro carburetors, the seat is not replaceable.

To put it in plain English: If your Walbro carburetor doesn't leak gas, but needs an overhaul, then it may be worth installing a new kit. But if it does leak gas, then I doubt that a new float valve will fix the problem. You'd be better off using a rebuilt Carter or Kohler K-series carburetor.

About 90% of small engine carburetors are made by Walbro nowadays, and I don't think that one is better than the other. The trick to getting the soft brass seat (and needle/float valve) to last longer is to use a fuel filter with a very fine mesh screen or fine mesh pleated paper element. The finer, the better. Because it's the microscopic dirt and grit that passes through the filter that causes the seat (and needle/float valve) to erode and wear. And every pressed-in brass seat that I've replaced ALWAYS leaked gas. There's just no way to get them to seal with the carburetor body, not even with high strength liquid threadlocker.

If a Walbro carburetor drips fuel, and a new carburetor is out of the question, the only options is to either install an under-the-[gas] tank or in-line fuel shut off valve (lots of people do this). Or a new carburetor can be purchased, and hope the leaking fuel situation doesn't happen again in a few years. (Walbro is like Walmart or Sam's Club, they want 'em keep coming back. This undoubtedly is how many big businesses nowadays keep selling new high-dollar replacement Chinese-made carburetors and other engine parts to unknowing or ignorant customers.)

The only problem using a Walbro on a pulling tractor or for high-performance application is they can't be bored out or modified in any way because the throttle bore wall (where the venturi is located) is too thin. Therefore, they're limited to how much air can flow through them. The US government EPA laws required that Kohler and all other small engine manufacturers redesign their carburetors so the engine will produce less air pollution. So they started using a redesigned emissions-controlled, EPA-approved Walbro carburetor with a fixed, non-adjustable high speed main jet. This is to prevent people from setting the air/fuel ratio too rich and create more air pollution. The older-designed Walbros that have an adjustable high speed main jet, which is located on the lower right side of the carburetor, are still available new.

Walbro WHG #52, #60 and #64 carburetors work great for ordinary lawn and garden equipment, general yard work and they're perfect for basic stock low rpm/low-performance pulling tractors with an engine that's governed to a maximum of 3,200 rpm with a fixed main jet, or at 3,600 rpm with an adjustable main jet. A carburetor with a fixed high speed main jet is limited to just 3,200 rpm and should never be operated faster for an extended length of time. Although the venturi cannot be bored out on a Walbro, they work equally as well as the older Carter or Kohler carburetors when used on a stock engine. The main jet in the newer Walbro WHG #52, #60 and #64 carburetors are calibrated at the factory to provide the engine with just the right amount of fuel at 3,200 rpm. Therefore, the fixed jet inside the carburetor cannot be replaced with an adjustable one.

Walbro WHG #52, #60 and #64 carburetors with a fixed main jet are designed with emission controls in mind to run leaner to create less air pollution. However, the main problem with most Walbros having a fixed main jet is during cooler weather operation. During cool weather, and running at 3,200 rpm, the engine will sometimes run too lean on fuel and operate erratically. To fix this, first of all, make sure the hole in the main jet is partially clogged. If it is, use a carburetor jet cleaner wire set or an oxy-acetylene welding torch tip cleaner to clear any debris that may be lodged in the hole. Then use [150± psi] compressed air to clear out any debris. If the engine still runs too lean on fuel, simply enlarge the hole in the main jet a few thousandths of an inch. Then use [150± psi] compressed air to clear out any metal particles. Be careful not to enlarge the hole in the main jet too much, or the engine will run rich on fuel! The hole diameter in the OEM factory main jet for 100% gasoline is 3/64" (.047"). If necessary, enlarge the main jet and fuel inlet holes with a #55 (.052") drill bit. That's a .0052" difference. After doing this, for cool weather, the engine should run better, last longer and produce more power. But don't enlarge the hole in the main jet too much! A too big of a hole will cause an engine to run too rich on fuel, making it blow black smoke out the exhaust and possibly fouling the spark plug. If the hole is made too large, the carburetor will be useless for gasoline, and E85 fuel must be used. But if an engine is going to be used only during warm weather and if it runs okay [during warm weather], don't enlarge the hole in the main jet.

On the newer carburetors with a fixed main jet, the hole in the main jet may need to be enlarged .002"-.003" to give the engine a little more fuel so it'll run better at higher rpm. Otherwise, the engine could "burn up" or wear out prematurely due to the lean air/fuel mixture. I have an assortment of tiny drill bits that I use on our customer's lawn & garden equipment carburetors.

IMPORTANT! A new style Walbro carburetor with a fixed high speed main jet should never be used on a non-governed (wide-open throttle) engine or on an engine that's going to turn at 3,200 rpm! The reason for this is because if an engine operates faster with a carburetor having a fixed high speed main jet, it'll run too lean on fuel at high rpm (it'll draw much more air than fuel), which will cause the combustion chamber to overheat and the excessive heat will likely damage the piston and rings and possibly warp the cylinder head and/or exhaust valve or even crack the cast iron engine block. A lean fuel mixture can also melt away part of the aluminum in the combustion chamber of an aluminum block engine.

The size number on the Walbro WHG #52, #60 and #64 carburetors is embossed inside the carburetor and can be seen by looking inside the upper part of the choke end, just above the venturi. A "52" carburetor has a 26 millimeter diameter throttle bore, which converts closely to 1.024 inches (26 ÷ 25.4 = 1.024"), but actually measures 1.07".

And being the venturi in the old-style Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 carburetors used on Kohler engine models K90 (3.6hp), K91 (4hp), K141 (6¼hp), K160 (6.6hp), K161 (7hp) and K181 (8hp) can't be bored out either, the only option for pulling competitively with these is to fabricate an adapter to fasten to the intake port on the engine block and use a #52 Walbro or #26 Carter or Kohler carburetor.

The best way to determine which engine any particular carburetor is made for is to measure the diameter of the throttle bore. Because a set of numbers that's stamped on the carburetor body mean nothing, not even to Kohler Engine dealers. If a carburetor measures .822" (13/16"), then it's made for the 6¼hp, 7hp or 8hp engines. If it measures 1.07", then it's for the 10hp or 12hp engines. And if it measures 1.17" or 1.2", it's for a 14hp, 16hp (flathead) or 18hp OHV engine.


How to Set the Governor Adjustment - Top of page

If an engine revs with no closing of the throttle shaft, or surges, then the governor is probably out of adjustment or something is broken. To set the governor on a cast iron block Kohler single or twin cylinder engine models MV16, KT17, KT17II, KT19, KT19II, KT21, M18, MV18, M20 and MV20:

Install all the throttle linkages, governor parts, etc., in their respective places. Block the throttle lever in the wide open position, and rotate the cross-shaft counterclockwise Q as far as it will go and then tighten the clamp bolt/nut. And that's all that's to it! If this doesn't fix the problem, then perhaps the governor gear is damaged and/or the stub shaft is worn (wobbling around, which will cause throttle surging), the lever broke off the cross-shaft (which will cause the engine to run at wide open throttle), or the throttle plate retaining screws came out of the throttle shaft.

And it doesn't matter how long or short the link between the governor lever to the throttle lever is because the governor is set by the clamp on the cross-shaft. Actually, I don't know why Kohler made the link adjustable. It serves no purpose to lengthen or shorten it.

You can also go here for further details and pictures: http://cubfaq.com/govadjust.html.

And to set the high rpm governored speed, place one end of the governor spring in the middle to lower hole in the "L" shaped governor lever, and place the other end of the spring in either the top or second hole from the top in the short lever that's located under the carburetor or on the flywheel shroud. It's best to use a [Dixson] small engine tachometer to determine the exact rpm to prevent over-revving of the engine, which could cause the connecting rod to break. (Double the reading on the [Dixson] tachometer on engines with camshaft-operated ignition points.) The high speed governor limit for a stock engine is set at 3,600 rpm. For a stock pulling engine, set it at 4,000 rpm, or whatever your sanctioning rules require.

By the way - Kohler's 23 coil governor springs works better than their governor springs with more coils when used on a stock pulling tractor because these maintain the rpms at a more steady pace.

Do not mistakenly rotate the cross shaft clockwise (opposite rotation than what it shows in the drawing above È) until it stops, tighten the clamp and then run the engine! Doing this could cause the lever (see below Ê) to jam into the governor flyweights, breaking off the lever and/or possibly destroying the governor gear assembly.

If the governor cross-shaft (the shaft that protrudes from the block) gets bent due to rough handling of the engine, and if it's not bent too bad, just use a small hammer to straighten it. It's made of mild steel. But if it's bent severely and breaks off, it must be replaced. If this happens, usually the bronze bushing (Kohler part # 235476) will break also and it will need to be replaced, too. Or, if the above È adjustment was attempted, and the governor shaft keeps rotating without stopping, this means the flat lever on the shaft has broken off. It can usually be found at the bottom of the oil pan. A broken off lever will allow an engine to operate dangerously at wide open throttle at all times.

To fix either of the above È, another governor cross shaft (Kohler part # A-235256-S) must be installed. To install another shaft, the entire engine must be completely disassembled. This means EVERYTHING inside the engine block (crankcase) will need to be removed. And then the replacement shaft can installed from inside the crankcase. But before the original shaft is removed, the bronze bushing on the outside must first be removed. The governor gear assembly doesn't have to be removed. The shaft lifts out from inside the crankcase and is installed in reverse order of removal. And it'll be a good idea to place a small bead of weld on the flat lever to secure it to the shaft to prevent future breakage. (I think this is something that Kohler should have done originally.) I realize that this is a lot of work just to replace a small [important] part, but it must be done in this way. There is no other way to replace it. Before installing, apply clean motor oil on shaft for smooth governor action and less wear to shaft and/or bushing.

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Nylon Governor Gears. Good for up to 4,000 rpm. OEM Kohler part # A-235743-S.
  • Used and in excellent condition. $20.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.]
  • New. $39.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
Cast Iron Governor Gear. Good for above 4,000 rpm up to wide open throttle. Will not explode or flex at high rpms like the nylon governor gears sometimes do. OEM Kohler part # A-237031. (Discontinued from Kohler.)
  • Used and in excellent condition. $60.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.]
3/8" Diameter Governor Gear Stub Shafts -

For Kohler engine models K141 (6¼hp), K160 (6.6hp), K161 (7hp), K181/M8 (8hp). .625" length. Kohler part # 230125-S.

  • Aftermarket. Precision ground, heat-treated alloy steel. $10.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $20.80 each, plus shipping & handling.

For Kohler engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 (16hp) flatheads, K361 (18hp OHV) and KT-series & Magnum twin cylinder flathead engines. .815" length. Kohler part # 235125-S.

  • Aftermarket. Precision ground, heat-treated alloy steel. $15.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $43.55 each, plus shipping & handling.
New hardened steel thrust washer for nylon or cast iron governor gears. Kohler # 237022-S.
  • Aftermarket. $2.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $3.70 each, plus shipping & handling.
Governor Cross Shafts for Kohler engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 (16hp) flatheads, K361 (18hp OHV). NOTE: Before installing, apply clean motor oil on shaft for smooth governor action and less wear to shaft and/or bushing. OEM Kohler part # A-235256-S.
  • Used and welded. $10.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Used and welded. $15.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • New and not welded. $24.60 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • New and welded. $30.00 each, plus shipping & handling.

Steel Spacer for governor cross shaft above È. Kohler part # 25 112 17-S.

  • Aftermarket. $1.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $4.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
Bronze Governor Cross Shaft Bushing for Kohler engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 (16hp) flatheads, K361 (18hp OHV). NOTE: Before installing, apply clean motor oil on governor shaft for smooth governor action and less wear to shaft and bushing. OEM Kohler part # 235476-S.
  • New. $7.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
23 Coils (Short) Governor Spring. Designed for Kohler engine models M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), M14 (14hp) and K341 (16hp) used with a generator and/or welder. Also works better than the spring below Ê when used on a competitive stock pulling engine because this one maintains the rpms at a more steady pace. OEM Kohler part # 45 091 01-S.
  • $10.25 each, plus shipping & handling.

26 Coils (Short) Governor Spring. Designed for most Kohler engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 and K361 (18hp OHV). Used in Cub Cadet models: 70, 71, 72, 73, 86, 100, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 149, 169, 1050, 1204, 1210 and 1211. Most common for general yard and garden use. OEM Kohler part # 235496-S.

  • $9.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
23 Coils (Long) Governor Spring. Designed for certain Kohler Magnum engine models M10 (10hp), M12 (12hp), M14 (14hp) and M16 (16hp) used with an air compressor. Also works better than the spring below Ê when used on a competitive stock pulling engine because this one maintains the rpms at a more steady pace. OEM Kohler part # 47 089 07-S.
  • $13.90 each, plus shipping & handling.

26 Coils (Long) Governor Spring. Designed for certain Kohler Magnum engine models M10 (10hp), M12 (12hp), M14 (14hp) and M16 (16hp). For heavy yard & garden use and snow blowing. OEM Kohler part # 47 089 09-S.

  • $4.90 each, plus shipping & handling.

34 Coils (Long) Governor Spring. Designed for Kohler K-series and Magnum engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K321/M14 (14hp) and K341/M16 (16hp). Used in "Quiet Line" Cub Cadet models: 680, 1000, 1200, 1210, 1250, 1282, 1450 and 1650. "Quiet Line" John Deere engines, too. Most common for general yard & garden use. OEM Kohler part # 47 091 01-S.

  • $10.40 each, plus shipping & handling.


The Wrong Type of Choke Lever!

Whenever I get a carburetor with the choke lever in the wrong position, if it has a steel choke shaft, I just grind the lever off at the flare and weld it back on the shaft in the right position. But if it has a brass shaft, I use a steel choke shaft out of a junk carburetor. Or if I don't have a used one in stock, I machine a steel choke shaft from a 1/4" mild steel rod. Like the old saying goes: "There's more than one way to skin a cat."

The Choke Shaft Detent Ball and Spring -

There's a tiny (1/8" or 5/32") steel ball and spring located in the air filter housing screw hole at the 9:00 position when facing the choke end with the carburetor right-side up. This ball and spring is used to retain the choke plate in the open position when it's hand-operated. But if the choke is remotely-operated by a cable, the ball and spring isn't needed. Before the choke shaft is removed [with your right hand], hold your left hand thumb over the screw hole and left hand index finger over the outside choke shaft hole to prevent the ball (and possibly spring) from flying out and getting lost.

Installing the choke shaft over the friction (detent) ball can be tricky. This is how it's done:

  1. Place the carburetor on a sturdy work bench or table with the choke end facing upward and the float area facing toward you, or gently clamp it in a bench vise.
  2. Install the ball and spring in the threaded air filter housing mounting hole located at the 9:00 position. Make sure the ball is centered with the spring.
  3. Use an 1/8" roll pin punch with a blunt end to firmly compress the spring/ball.
  4. When using your left hand to compress the ball/spring with the punch, place a finger over the outside shaft hole to insure the ball will not "pop out" and go flying across your shop.
  5. Use your right hand to gently slide the shaft in through the hole until it makes contact with the punch, then at the same time while still pushing on the shaft, reposition the punch at an angle (toward your right), then slowly pull up on the punch at the same time continuing pushing the shaft through the hole so the shaft can slide over the ball. Make sure your finger is still over the end hole!
  6. The end of the shaft should now be flush with the outside of the carburetor body. Gently rotate the shaft to feel the ball "catch" in the detent hole.
  7. If this goes well, install the choke plate and apply clean motor oil through the screw holes for smooth choke operation and less wear to the shaft and/or carburetor body.

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If you need any of the parts listed below Ê, please contact A-1 Miller's Performance Enterprises | 1501 W. Old Plank Rd. | Columbia, MO 65203-9136 USA | Phone: 1-573-875-4033. Please call Monday-Friday (except Holidays), 9am to 5pm, Central time zone. If no answer, please try again later. (When speaking with Brian, please be patient because I stutter.) Fax: 1-573-449-7347. E-mail: pullingtractor@aol.com. You can also contact us through Yahoo! Messenger: Find us here: Directions to our shop | Yahoo! Maps, 1501 W. Old Plank Rd., Columbia, MO | 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO - Google Maps or Map of 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO by MapQuest. More of our parts & services: Brian Miller's Carburetor and Fuel System Parts and Machine Shop Services | NOTE: To place an order, please call or send an email with a list and description of the parts or services you need. Because as of right now, we're not set up to accept orders through our web sites online.

Coming Soon! A-1 Miller's own CNC-machined steel throttle and choke shafts for all Carter and Kohler carburetors mentioned in my web sites. (Will come without lever; reuse old lever - align and weld to new shaft.) Projected price, any shaft: $10.00 each, plus shipping & handling.

Choke shaft w/cable-controlled lever for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Walbro WHL #36, #44 carburetors used on Kohler engine models K90 (3.6hp), K91, K141, K160/K161, K181 and M8. Overall shaft length: 2-1/2". (The 1-7/8" long choke shaft, which was made by Carter, is no longer available.) Comes with screws and split lock washers. NOTE: Apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth choke operation and less wear to shaft and/or carburetor body.
  • Kohler part # 41 090 22-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $18.10 each, plus shipping & handling.
Choke shaft w/hand-operated or cable-controlled angled lever for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Walbro WHL #36, #44 carburetors used on Kohler engine models K90 (3.6hp), K91, K141, K160/K161, K181 and M8. Overall shaft length: 2-1/16". (The 1-7/8" long choke shaft, which was made by Carter, is no longer available.) Comes with screws and split lock washers. NOTE: Apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth choke operation and less wear to shaft and/or carburetor body.
  • Kohler part # 41 090 20-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $18.10 each, plus shipping & handling.
Choke shaft w/cable-controlled, swivel screw clamp lever for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Walbro WHL #36, #44 carburetors used on Kohler engine models K90 (3.6hp), K91, K141, K160/K161, K181 and M8. Overall shaft length: 2-1/2". (The 1-7/8" long choke shaft, which was made by Carter, is no longer available.) Comes with screws and split lock washers. NOTE: Apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth choke operation and less wear to shaft and/or carburetor body.
  • OEM Walbro part # 40-917-1. $17.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
Choke shaft w/short, cable-controlled lever for Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 and Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors with the round air filter housing assembly. Overall shaft length: 2-5/8". Comes with screws and split lock washers. NOTE: This choke shaft is made by Walbro and designed for Walbro choke plates. Therefore, the holes in the Kohler choke plate may need to be elongated to align with the threaded holes in this shaft. And apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth choke operation and less wear to shaft and/or carburetor body.
  • Kohler part # 47 090 35-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $27.25 each, plus shipping & handling.
Choke shaft w/short, angled lever for Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 and Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors with the round air filter housing assembly. Overall shaft length: 2-5/8". Comes with screws and split lock washers. NOTE: This choke shaft is made by Walbro and designed for Walbro choke plates. Therefore, the holes in the OEM Carter or Kohler choke plate (with K stamped in it) may need to be elongated to align with the threaded holes in this shaft. And apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth choke operation and less wear to shaft and/or carburetor body.
  • Kohler part # 47 090 34-S. (Made by Walbro.) $27.25 each, plus shipping & handling.
Choke shaft w/long lever for Kohler #26, #28, #30 and Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors with the oblong air filter housing assembly (Quiet Line). Overall shaft length: 2-5/8". Comes with screws and split lock washers. NOTE: This choke shaft is made by Walbro and designed for Walbro choke plates. Therefore, the holes in the OEM Kohler choke plate (with K stamped in it) may need to be elongated to align with the threaded holes in this shaft. And apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth choke operation and less wear to shaft and/or carburetor body.
  • Kohler part # 47 090 38-S. (Made by Walbro.) $27.25 each, plus shipping & handling.
Choke Shaft w/"Downward Swing" Lever (most common) for Kohler engine models KT17, KT19, KT19II, M18, M20 with Kohler #26 or Walbro WHG #52 carburetor. Overall shaft length: 2-5/8". For carburetors with following numbers stamped on mounting flange: 52 053 01, 52 053 09, 52 053 20, 52 053 26, 52 053 28, 52 053 31, 52 053 36, 52 053 37, 52 053 38, 52 053 46, 52 053 50, 52 053 52, 52 053 56, 52 053 58, 52 053 63, 52 053 63, 52 053 66. Comes with screws and split lock washers. NOTE: This choke shaft is made by Walbro and designed for Walbro choke plates. Therefore, the holes in the OEM Kohler choke plate (with K stamped in it) may need to be elongated to align with the threaded holes in this shaft. And apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth choke operation and less wear to shaft and/or carburetor body.
  • Kohler part # 52 090 12-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $24.25 each, plus shipping & handling.

Choke Shaft w/"Upward Swing" Lever for Kohler engine models KT17, KT17II, MV16, M18, MV18, MV20 with Kohler #26 or Walbro WHG #52 carburetor. Overall shaft length: 2-5/8". For carburetors with following numbers stamped on mounting flange: 52 053 18, 52 053 21, 52 053 27, 52 053 32, 52 053 34, 52 053 47, 52 053 51, 52 053 54, 52 053 55, 52 053 59. Comes with screws and split lock washers. NOTE: This choke shaft is made by Walbro and designed for Walbro choke plates. Therefore, the holes in the OEM Kohler choke plate (with K stamped in it) may need to be elongated to align with the threaded holes in this shaft. And apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth choke operation and less wear to shaft and/or carburetor body.

  • Kohler part # 52 090 13-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $24.25 each, plus shipping & handling.
Choke Friction (Detent) Ball for all Carter or Kohler #16, #18, #20, #22, #26, #28, #30 and Walbro WHL #36, #44 carburetors. 1/8" diameter. NOTE: The ball and spring is for hand-operation of the choke only, such as for a generator/welder engine. If choke is cable-operated, such as in a tractor, then the ball and spring isn't needed.
  • OEM Walbro part # 89-13-8. .35¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 25 194 02-S. (Made by Walbro.) $1.65 each, plus shipping & handling.

Choke Friction (Detent) Ball for Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors. 5/32" diameter. NOTE: The ball and spring is for hand-operation of the choke only, such as for a generator/welder engine. If choke is cable-operated, such as in a tractor, then the ball and spring isn't needed.

  • OEM Walbro part # 89-29-8. .35¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 25 194 01-S. (Made by Walbro.) $7.20 each, plus shipping & handling.
Choke Friction (Detent) Spring for Walbro WHL #36, #44 carburetors. Dimensions: 1/8" diameter x 5/16" long. NOTE: The ball and spring is for hand-operation of the choke only, such as for a generator/welder engine. If choke is cable-operated, such as in a tractor, then the ball and spring isn't needed. Also, the 1/8" diameter x 1/2" long spring for the Carter and Kohler #16, #18, #20, #22, #26, #28, #30 carburetors have been discontinued by Kohler. This 1/8" diameter x 5/16" long spring can be used in these carburetors with an 1/8" diameter x 3/16" long solid spacer placed under spring. (An 1/8" diameter x 3/16" long Allen set screw makes an excellent spacer.)
  • OEM Walbro part # 98-162-7. .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 25 089 06-S. (Made by Walbro.) $1.65 each, plus shipping & handling.

Choke Friction (Detent) Spring for Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors. Dimensions: 5/32" diameter x 1/2" long. NOTE: The ball and spring is for hand-operation of the choke only, such as for a generator/welder engine. If choke is cable-operated, such as in a tractor, then the ball and spring isn't needed. Also, the 1/8" diameter x 1/2" long spring for the Carter and Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors have been discontinued by Kohler. It's replaced with the 5/32" diameter spring, which is to be used with the 5/32" ball. The detent hole in the carburetor will need to be drilled out to 5/32" to accommodate the bigger spring and ball. And be careful not to drill the hole deeper, just make it bigger.

  • OEM Walbro part # 98-198-7. .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 25 089 03-S. (Made by Walbro.) $7.20 each, plus shipping & handling.


How to adjust the fuel mixture screws on a Kohler (or virtually any early small engine) carburetor - Top of page

First of all, on the Carter or Kohler carburetors, the hole towards the bottom of the long high speed main needle adjuster is supposed to be open, so the engine can draw fuel for idling from the float bowl. The idle fuel passageways for a Carter or Kohler carburetor goes as follows: The fuel is first drawn through the high speed needle adjuster via the lower hole towards the bottom, then it travels upward, then over and down toward the idle mixture screw (which sets at an angle), and then the fuel is drawn into the throttle bore, next to the throttle plate. The information below Ê is mainly for Carter or Kohler carburetors. The fuel mixture screws are used as follows:

Many times when cleaning a Carter or Kohler carburetor, the welch plug that's on the side of the carburetor doesn't need to be removed. With the idle air/fuel mixture screw and the high speed needle adjuster removed, use [150± psi] compressed air in either screw hole and feel if air comes out either hole and if air comes out the tiny fuel hole that's next to the throttle plate. If air does come out of these holes, then the idle fuel passageway is clear and the welch plug don't need to be removed. A squirt of WD40 or carburetor cleaner (in an aerosol spray can) can be used instead of [150± psi] compressed air.

Advertisement:
If you need any of the items listed below Ê, please contact A-1 Miller's Performance Enterprises | 1501 W. Old Plank Rd. | Columbia, MO 65203-9136 USA | Phone: 1-573-875-4033. Please call Monday-Friday (except Holidays), 9am to 5pm, Central time zone. If no answer, please try again later. (When speaking with Brian, please be patient because I stutter.) Fax: 1-573-449-7347. E-mail: pullingtractor@aol.com. You can also contact us through Yahoo! Messenger: Find us here: Directions to our shop | Yahoo! Maps, 1501 W. Old Plank Rd., Columbia, MO | 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO - Google Maps or Map of 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO by MapQuest. Go here for more parts: Carburetor, Fuel System Parts & Machine Shop Services | NOTE: To place an order, please call or send an email with a list and description of the parts or services you need. Because as of right now, we're not set up to accept orders through our web sites online.
3/64" (.0469") diameter x 1-3/8" long quality high speed steel drill bit. Use to enlarge lower hole on high speed needle adjuster for Carter or Kohler carburetors so engine will idle better. $1.60 each, plus shipping & handling. Many other small size drill bits available.
Throttle and Choke Plate Retaining Screws for Carter, Kohler and Walbro carburetors used on various Kohler and other small engines. The stainless steel screws have a tensile strength of 60,000 psi.
  • 3-48 NC Stainless Steel Screws w/split lock washers for Carter or Kohler carburetors. (.095" thread diameter.) Replaces Kohler part # 234209-S. (Discontinued from Kohler). $1.00 per pair, plus shipping & handling.
  • 4-40 NC Stainless Steel Screws w/split lock washers for Walbro or as an oversize replacement for Carter or Kohler carburetors when 3-48 threads strip out. (.108" thread diameter.) Replaces Walbro part # 96-263-7, Kohler part # 25 086 27-S. $1.00 per pair, plus shipping & handling.
  • 4-40 NC Walbro screws w/self-locking head. OEM Walbro part # 96-263-7, Kohler part # 25 086 27-S. $2.00 per pair, plus shipping & handling.
  • 5-44 NF Zinc-Plated Steel Screws w/split lock washers for various throttle and choke shafts that require this size or as an oversize replacement when smaller screw threads strip out. (.135" thread diameter.) $1.00 per pair, plus shipping & handling.
  • When ordering, please specify the size you need. Many other small screw sizes available. Please contact me and I'll see if I can get what you need at a reasonable price.
Quality High Speed Steel Taps -
  • 3-48 NC high speed steel taper tap. For repairing OEM threads in Carter or Kohler throttle and choke shafts. $8.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • 4-40 NC high speed steel taper tap. For Walbro and cutting oversize threads in throttle and choke shafts. $8.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • 5-40 NC high speed steel taper tap. For cutting oversize threads in throttle and choke shafts. $6.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Many other small size taps available.


For easy removal and installation of the hex-shaped float valve seat in Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors, use a 1/4" drive, 3/8" deep well socket with half machined down (in a metal lathe) to 1/2" so it will fit into the seat depression in the carburetor body.


If an engine blows black smoke out the exhaust while running, then here are the main causes:

Black exhaust smoke is when an engine is getting too much gas and/or not enough air in the combustion chamber. The causes for this are either... (listed from most common to rare causes)

  1. Choke plate isn't fully opening.
    • Solution: Check for bent choke plate, binding cable-controlled choke operation or adjust cable that controls opening/closing of choke plate.
  2. Too rich of fuel mixture adjustment on the carburetor.
    • Solution: Adjust carburetor or repair as needed.
  3. Worn float valve (needle and seat).
    • Solution: Install new float valve and seat.
  4. Bad float.
    • Solution: Install new or good used float.
  5. Float out of adjustment.
    • Solution: Set the float so it's level with the carburetor body with the carburetor turned upside-down.
  6. If the fuel baffle shield is rigid and stiff, it can push down on the float after the float bowl is installed, preventing the float from shutting off the fuel at the float valve (needle and seat).
    • Solution: Install new baffle shield.
  7. Too much fuel pressure if using an electric fuel pump.
    • Solution: Use a low pressure electric fuel pump or install fuel regulator.
  8. Hole in the main jet/nozzle have been drilled too large.
  9. Weak or wrong condenser for standard-output (OEM) ignition coil, or one ordinary condenser being used with a high-performance/high output coil.
    • Solution: Install new or correct condenser that matches the coil's output voltage, or install two ordinary condensers or one high capacity/high-performance condenser for a high-performance coil.

Also, sometimes flooding of the carburetor will deposit gas in the motor oil, but only in a vertical shaft engine. Because gas can't seep into the crankcase on horizontal shaft engines. The cause of the problem is the carburetor is flooding. The gas seeps past the piston ring gaps and into the crankcase. To fix this, clean the float valve (needle and seat) in the carburetor, or install a new carburetor overhaul kit with a new float valve needle and seat. Also, clean out the fuel hoses with [150± psi] compressed air and install a new fuel filter. And then the oil will need to be drained and fresh motor oil installed.

The Cause of Carburetor Flooding at Slow Idle with a Long Duration/high-performance Camshaft -

Sometimes when using a long duration/high-performance camshaft, despite if the engine has a modified or stock carburetor, if the engine idles for a long period of time, it may run rich on fuel at slow idle speeds. What happens is with a long duration cam, intake vacuum is low and with a single cylinder engine, excess fuel builds up in the intake extension/port. Any engine that has a long duration camshaft have low vacuum at slow idle speeds. The longer the duration, the lower the vacuum. What causes excess fuel to build up in the intake is the long duration of the cam lobes holds the [intake] valve open longer, and at slow idle, the pressure of the piston blows some of the air/fuel back into the intake tube. The more duration a cam has, the worse this will be. As the engine is accelerated, black smoke or raw unburned fuel will blow out the exhaust until the fuel is cleared out of the intake tube. With the engine running well above idle, air becomes trapped within the combustion chamber and the piston don't have time to blow any air/fuel back into the intake. This happens with automotive gasoline, E85 or 100% methanol fuels, and there's nothing that can be done about it. There's probably nothing wrong with the carburetor, and nothing can be done to the idle circuit to prevent this. Just make a simple adjustment with the idle air/fuel mixture screw so the engine idles smoothly, and don't allow the engine to idle for a long period of time.

The Major Causes of Carburetor Flooding -

Personally, I don't put additives in any of my gas. I think it's a waste of money and effort. I just dump any left-over gas from my customer's small engine equipment in my car or truck, let it mix with the fresh gas that's already in the tank, and then I use fresh gas in my customer's small engine equipment. If there's water in the gas, I separate the gas from the water in a bucket (water always goes to the bottom). And if there's dirt or debris in the gas, I strain/filter the gas through a clean shop towel placed in a funnel into a gas can.

What prevents most carburetor and fuel system from having problems when using gasoline is to run the engine out of fuel or draining the entire fuel system if it's not going to be used for more than 30 days at a time. If there's no fuel left in the system, then there should be no problems. The following causes are listed from most common to rare.

If fuel drips out of the carburetor...

  1. Dirt, debris, lint or a hair lodged between float valve and seat. This will prevent the float valve from fully closing against the seat.
    • Solution: Clean float valve and seat, flush out entire fuel system with [150± psi] compressed air and install new fuel filter. NOTE: Don't use [150± psi] compressed air to clean out a canister-type pleated paper fuel filter. The high air pressure could rip the paper, allowing dirt and debris to pass through to the carburetor.
  2. Old, dry-rotted pleated paper fuel filter. The paper is brittle, can tear easy, which will allow dirt and debris to pass through to the carburetor.
    • Solution: Clean carburetor, flush out entire fuel system with [150± psi] compressed air and install new fuel filter.
  3. Worn or damaged fuel inlet valve and/or seat.
    • Solution: New replacement required.
  4. Loose float valve seat in carburetor body (if it's the threaded-in type). Sometimes these are not installed tight enough, resulting in a light flooding condition.
    • Solution: If tightening the seat doesn't stop the fuel leak, then a new float valve and seat with a new sealing gasket will need to be installed.
  5. Float bowl not sealing tight against the neoprene rubber O-ring seal and fuel baffle splash shield.
    • Solution: Remove float bowl, use a small hammer to flatten center of bowl from inside so when installed and bottom screw is tightened, the bowl will press tighter against the O-ring seal and baffle shield to prevent a fuel leak from gas splashing inside the float bowl.

If gas constantly pours out of the carburetor...

  1. Bad or damaged float (hole in float). To test for a bad float, if it's a hollow brass float, remove it from the carburetor and either move it around in your hand or hold it next to your ear. If you feel and hear a sloshing sound, then there's gas inside it. NOTE: Repairing by re-soldering a brass float will most likely not work or last long. NOTE: Do NOT use a small torch to solder a hole in a float that had gas in it! The gas fumes inside WILL cause the float to explode!
    • Solution: New or good/used float replacement is required.
  2. Small hole in bottom of float bowl. This happens to aluminum float bowls and is caused by corrosion from water in the fuel system. Water is heavier than gas. So it goes below the gas and straight to the carburetor. Water will corrode an aluminum float bowl. And during winter, it'll freeze in the float bowl and crush the float.
    • Solution: New replacement of either part is required.
  3. Float stuck to bottom of float bowl. This is caused by engine setting in storage for a long period of time with gas left in the gas tank and carburetor. To prevent this from happening or happening in the future, drain the entire fuel system, and then loosen the float bowl retaining bolt to finish draining all the fuel from the float bowl.
    • Solution: Cleaning of float and bowl is required.
  4. Float valve installed incorrectly. (When installing a new overhaul kit.)
    • Solution: The rubber tip (pointed end) goes in the fuel inlet seat and not against the float.
  5. If the carburetor on an engine has been setting for some time without an air filter housing, and if gas pours out of the carburetor only when cranking the engine, especially with a mechanical fuel pump, then the gas stops pouring out when the engine isn't cranked, check for a clogged atmospheric vent passageway in the carburetor. Sometimes a mud dauber (wasp-like insect) will build their nest in a place like this. (I've seen this happen a few times with carburetor rebuilds.)
    • Solution: Clear out the atmospheric vent passageway (and entire carburetor) with [150± psi] compressed air.
  6. If an electric fuel pump is used, it either has too much pressure, or if there's a fuel pressure regulator in-line, it's set too high or stuck in position.
    • Solution: Repair or adjust regulator as needed.

What makes crankcase oil black is blow-by due to either worn piston rings, carburetor flooding or the engine running rich on fuel (gas). And if there's gas in the oil (you can smell the presence of gas), this means there's a hole in the diaphragm in the mechanical fuel pump. Being there are no fuel pump repair kits available nowadays, an either good used or new replacement fuel pump is required.

How to Separate Gas from Water - (With the price of gasoline nowadays, this would be a wise thing to do.)

  1. Drain the water-contaminated gas from the entire fuel system (gas tank, fuel hose, fuel pump, filter and carburetor) into a clean container of adequate size. The water (and dirt or debris) should immediately settle to the bottom of the container and the gas will be on top. You should be able to see the separation under a bright light.
  2. Slowly pour the gas into another clean container, but watch that the water don't enter the other container, too. If there's dirt or debris in the water-contaminated gas, place a filtering material, such as a paint filter, coffee filter, fine mesh screen wire, clean cloth shop towel or an old [fine woven] window curtain, over a wide-mouth funnel in a clean container of adequate size, and pour the gas through the filtering material/funnel, but again, watch that the water don't enter the other container, too.
    • NOTE: If water-contaminated gas have been treated with a gas line anti-freeze treatment (to break up the water into droplets), the water may not separate from the gas in the container. If this is the case, then the water can be easily separated from the gas by using genuine (not synthetic) chamois leather. The surface fibers in chamois leather will absorb water and allow gas to pass through. If the gas has any amount of alcohol (10% or E85), the alcohol will also pass through the chamois. Place the chamois over a wide-mouth funnel in a container of adequate size, and pour the water-contaminated gas through the chamois/funnel. The chamois will also filter out any dirt or debris that may in the water-contaminated gas. When finished, twist or wring out the chamois to remove the water and allow it to air-dry.
  3. Use [150± psi] compressed air to clear out the remaining water-contaminated gas from the entire fuel system and use a dry shop towel clamped to a long, needle nosed pliers to soak up the gas/water in the gas tank. Make sure the tank is dry.
  4. Pour the water-free gas back into the gas tank and dispose the contaminated water in the container.

DANGER! IMPORTANT! Gasoline and alcohol fuels are both extremely flammable! Use caution and don't smoke, avoid making sparks or don't have an open flame exposed when working near or with either of them. Work in a well-ventilated area, too.

By the way - We've been to a lot of garden tractor pulls through the years and noticed that some pulling tractors leak fuel in places where a fuel leak shouldn't be. Therefore, I think the safety inspections should include checking the fuel hoses for dry-rotting, cracks, fuel leaks, loose fittings, etc. (The tractors should have sturdy wheelie bars, too.) The inspectors should grab hold of the fuel hose(s) with their hand, bend it and slightly jerk on it to check for durability. This is very important. Especially in a kid's class. Don't wait until an issue becomes a problem, and then turn into a catastrophe. If a pulling club's sanctioning safety rules are enforced, and pullers would build their tractors right and maintain them regularly, there wouldn't be any injuries, fires, or fear of a fire. Click here to read more about a garden pulling tractor catching on fire.


If an engine won't idle or idles poorly, then the following should be checked and corrected...

  1. If it's a Carter or Kohler carburetor, chances are, there's dirt or dried gas in the high speed main fuel needle adjuster.
    • Micro-Chuck. For use with #60-80 gauge wire drills. Grips drills firmly and accurately in various sizes; as small as a human hair. They can be used hand-held, hand-held drills or in a drill press.Solutions: Remove adjuster, if it has just one lower hole, enlarge it with a micro-chuck having a 3/64" (.047") or a #56 through #60 (.0465" through .040") drill bit. Carefully enlarge the hole by hand. There's no need to use an electric drill. Then use [150± psi] compressed air to clear out any debris, and then suck through the tube with your mouth to make sure it's clear and unclogged. If it's still clogged, use a bread wire tie to clean out the inside of the tube. Then use the [150± psi] compressed air to thoroughly clear it out. Suck through the tube with your mouth to make sure it's clear and unclogged. If performing either of the above È doesn't clear out the tube, then acquire another high speed main fuel needle adjuster in good condition or a new one. But make sure it's the correct adjuster for your particular carburetor.
  2. If it's a Carter or Kohler carburetor, and if the inside of the high speed main fuel needle adjuster tube is clear of debris, but the engine still fails to idle...
    • Solution: The carburetor probably has the wrong high speed needle adjuster. If the adjuster has four tiny holes midway (Kohler part #'s 235415-S or 48 103 01-S), thoroughly clean the area around the holes with fine emery cloth or wire wheel, and solder over (block off) two of the holes opposite of each other with a soldering gun and electrical solder. Doing this will create a stronger suction (vacuum) of fuel through the tube so the engine will idle. Be sure to smooth the solder (get rid of any lumps) so it won't obstruct the flow of air through the carburetor.
  3. Dirt or dried gas in the idle fuel passageway.
    • Solution: Completely disassemble carburetor, soak the carburetor body and metal parts overnight in Berryman® Chem-Dip® Carburetor and Parts Cleaner (available at most auto parts supply stores) to dissolve or loosen any dried gas deposits, crud and debris, then use [150± psi] compressed air to clear the debris from the carburetor body and idle fuel passageway.

If an engine idles slow when the throttle lever is held to the slowest position by hand, but refuses to idle down on its own, the following may be the causes:

But if an engine idles well, but runs only at higher rpms (up to 3,200 rpm with a fixed main jet; or 3,600 rpm with an adjustable main jet) with the choke partially closed, or if it surges or hesitates to rev up upon acceleration, this means the engine is running too lean on fuel, and following are the most likely causes: (listed from most common to rare)

FYI - If you've had your carburetor apart about 10 times, and you found nothing wrong with it, but the engine still runs the same with the same carburetor installed, then the problem obviously isn't in the carburetor. As an older, experienced mechanic once said, "Most carburetor problems are electrical." (Meaning faulty ignition system.) This has proven true more times than I can remember.


Backfiring out the exhaust upon deceleration is normal for virtually all engines since gas is still going through the combustion chamber, compressing in the exhaust and exploding from the exhaust heat. But if an engine constantly backfires out the exhaust at any speeds after running for several minutes, the problem may be...


The Anti-Backfire Solenoid Valve -

The anti-backfire solenoid valve (with a wire connected to it) is on the bottom of the float bowl of most newer lawn & garden tractor engines. The spring-loaded plunger in it stops the fuel supply to the combustion chamber by blocking off the main jet as soon as the ignition is turned off. This prevents a loud BANG out the muffler when the engine is hot. Without it, when the [hot] engine is turned off while throttled up, unburned gas will continue to pass through the combustion chamber, build up in the still red-hot muffler where the gas is compressed with hot air, and then produce a loud BANG out the muffler. It sounds just like a shotgun being fired.

If the solenoid goes bad (it's supposed to make a "click" sound when the ignition is turned on), it can be replaced with a new one, or remove it and simply snip off the protruding pin (plunger rod), and reinstall it. Doing this will allow the engine to draw fuel and run. But remember to idle the engine down for a few minutes each time before shutting it off, or like I said, it may produce a loud BANG out the muffler.


How To Loosen a Corroded or Rusted-In-Place Throttle, Choke Shaft or Adjusting Screw -

GUNK Liquid Wrench works wonders to loosen virtually any rusted or corroded metal part! Just spray the ends of the throttle or choke shaft, let soak for about 30 minutes or perhaps overnight, then use small Vise Grips to GENTLY rotate the shaft back and forth . Don't force it because it could become twisted and/or break off at the closest plate retaining screw hole! It may rotate (loosen) just a few thousandths of an inch. After it rotates slightly, spray it again and gently rotate it again. Eventually, it should rotate more and swivel 100% free.

If the shaft refuse to loosen with Liquid Wrench, remove the float bowl, float, baffle shield and O-ring seal. Clamp the carburetor in a bench vice, and then use an acetylene torch to lightly heat the carburetor body next to the shaft, and use the Vise Grips to GENTLY rotate the shaft back and forth . The shaft should swivel 100% free within a few seconds of heating. Heating also works great to remove a stuck-in-place idle speed adjuster screw, idle fuel mixture screw or the high speed main adjuster screw. Be very gentle rotating a brass screw to loosen it because it could snap off! And be careful not to get the aluminum too hot, it may melt! Don't use a torch in an attempt to remove a stuck main jet/nozzle. Being the aluminum surrounding the main jet/nozzle is thin, it could crack under severe heat, rendering the carburetor useless.


To prevent breaking off the throttle (or choke) plate screws when removing them, first, grind down the flared ends with a Dremel or equivalent small grinder chucked with a chainsaw chain sharpening stone. And should a screw break off, sometimes the shaft can be difficult to remove. In this case, use the Dremel to grind the flared end of the [broken] screw so it's flush with the throttle shaft. Then the shaft can be removed. Then the broken screw can be drilled out with either a 5/64", #46 or 2mm drill bit and retap the threads. The OEM Carter or Kohler screw size is 3-48 NC.

Should the threaded hole become enlarged from drilling out the broken screw, then the hole will need to be tapped bigger with a 4-40 NC tap, and a 4-40 NC screw can be installed. In this event, contact me and order the larger screws with split lock washers. Liquid threadlocker is not required with a lock washer.


Removing the Main Jet/Nozzle from a Carter or Kohler #26, #28 or #30 Carburetor -

10-18hp Kohler (or Carter [model N]) CarburetorWhen rebuilding a plain, stock Carter or Kohler #26, #28 or #30 carburetor, there is no need to remove the main jet/nozzle. If the main jet/nozzle will not come out, don't worry about it. All that has to be done is make sure that the bottom hole and side holes in the main jet/nozzle are open. To check if the side holes are open, simply spray WD-40 or carburetor cleaner through the small hole just beneath the choke plate and observe if it comes out the main jet/nozzle inside the throttle bore and float bowl area.

If the main jet/nozzle is clogged, or if you're boring the venturi to modify the carburetor for high-performance use, then the main jet/nozzle definitely needs to be removed. Before attempting to remove the main jet/nozzle, and if the screwdriver slot is in good condition, then I found the best, easiest and proven way to remove it is by the following process. This method works great most of the time and the main jet/nozzle should loosen with no problems.

  1. Remove the idle fuel mixture screw (so it won't get bent) and the high speed needle adjuster so the tip won't get damaged when performing the below Ê procedure.
  2. Cradle the carburetor body upside down (float area facing up) lengthways on the open jaws of a large bench vise.
  3. Place an impact driver or a quality-made flat blade screwdriver with a good, square end wide enough to fit the entire width of the threaded hole and thick enough for more contact with the slot in the main jet/nozzle.
  4. Using a medium size hammer, strike the impact driver or screwdriver sharply and perpendicular several times while at the same time rotating the main jet/nozzle counterclockwise Q by hand (with the screwdriver) to loosen it. Do not use a wooden handle screwdriver because the handle could break.
  5. If the above È didn't work, then perform the removal method below Ê.

If the above È method still didn't work, then unfortunately, sometimes the main jet/nozzle will get stuck in place and the screwdriver slot will strip out. (I hate when this happens.) The alternative method is to drill out the main jet/nozzle. This process is as follows:

  1. Remove the high speed needle adjuster for obvious reasons.
  2. Firmly clamp the carburetor body with the mounting end and choke end making contact with the jaws of a bench vise with the float area facing up.
  3. Drill perpendicular into the main jet/nozzle with a 3/16" drill bit, then carefully enlarge the hole with a 9/32" drill bit.
  4. Being very gentle, use a pointed chisel/punch with a slender and very sharp end and a small hammer to collapse the remaining threads of the main jet/nozzle. NOTE: Be extremely careful when doing this! Because the aluminum tube could crack, rendering the carburetor body totally useless.
  5. Pry out the remains of the main jet/nozzle with needle-nose pliers. If you're not able to remove the entire main jet/nozzle with needle-nose pliers, use a 3/16" diameter steel rod to drive out the remains of the main jet/nozzle through the high speed needle hole from the top side of the carburetor.
  6. Use a 3/8-24 NF tap to reshape and clean the threads for installation of another main jet/nozzle. Install either a new or good used main jet/nozzle from a junk carburetor. If the main jet/nozzle in a junk carburetor is stuck, you can just split the threaded tube with either a flat cold chisel or nut splitter. If attempting this, be careful not to damage the main jet/nozzle itself!


Removing the main jet/nozzle from a Carter #16, #18, #20 or #22 Carburetor for Cleaning -

If the main jet/nozzle in a Carter #16, #18, #20 or #22 carburetor that's used on Kohler engine models K90 (3.6hp), K91 (4hp), K141 (6¼hp), K160 (6.6hp), K161 (7hp) or K181 (8hp) needs to be removed for cleaning, being this type of nozzle is pressed in the carburetor body. It removes and reinstalls a lot easier than the above È main jet/nozzle. The removal and installation process is as follows:

  1. Remove the idle fuel mixture screw (so it won't get bent upon reinstallation of the main jet/nozzle), high speed needle adjuster, float bowl and float.
  2. Place the carburetor body right-side up (float area facing down) on the open jaws of a bench vise. Position the carburetor body crossways on the vise jaws so the float hinge loops won't break off. Do not tighten the vise jaws against the carburetor body.
  3. Using a 4" long x 11/64" (.172") diameter steel punch with a blunt end and a small hammer, go through the high speed needle hole from the top side of the carburetor, and drive the main jet/nozzle out from the bottom of carburetor body.
  4. To reinstall the main nozzle, place the carburetor body upside-down on the open jaws of the vise and use a 1/4" diameter steel [roll pin] punch and small hammer to drive it in until it bottoms out, and the end can be seen in the venturi.

By the way - as far as I know, new main jet/nozzles for the Carter #16, #18, #20 or #22 carburetor is not available from any source.


Removing a Broken-Off High Speed Main Fuel Mixture Adjuster Needle Valve from a Carter or Kohler Carburetor -

Sometimes when an engine sits with gas in the fuel system, the old, dried gas residue will cause the high speed adjuster to become seized in the carburetor body. And when attempting to remove it, the hollow tube could will break off flush with the carburetor body. (Anything is possible with soft brass and old, dried gas.) Anyway, The removal process of a broken-off main adjuster is as follows:

  1. Reach in through the choke end with needle-nose pliers or small long/needle-nose Vise-Grips and break off the needle part of the adjuster.
  2. From the top of the carburetor body, drill out the threaded part of the adjuster with a 3/16" drill bit, then work up to a 7/32" bit. Be sure to drill straight down into the adjuster! For precision and full control of the drilling process, this is best performed with the carburetor body clamped in a vice that's fastened on the table of a milling machine. (The broken adjuster may screw on out on its own when drilling it.)
  3. If it don't screw out when drilling it, use a long, slender hardened pointed punch to collapse the remains of the adjuster so it can be removed with the needle-nose pliers.
  4. Use a 1/4-28 NF tap to straighten and clean the threads for installation of another adjuster.

If you don't feel comfortable removing the broken adjuster yourself, I charge $30.00 labor, plus return shipping & handling, to remove a broken adjuster.


Using Pump Gas with 10% Ethanol Versus 100% Race Gas in a Pulling Tractor -

First of all, in an daily-driven vehicle, gasoline with no lead is hard on soft cast iron exhaust valve seats. A soft cast iron valve seat is one that's been machined directly into an engine block or cylinder head, and it have not been heated-treated or no hardened insert is installed. In a daily-driven automobile, the seat(s) will eventually deteriorate or the metal will literally "wear away" because the absence of lead in gas to provide a protective coating to prevent wear. And being most exhaust valves are made of extremely hardened steel, they're not likely to wear at all. The intake valve and the cast iron seat is not likely to wear as much, if any. And an engine block or cylinder head with heat-treated seats or have hardened steel exhaust valve seat insert(s) installed, they should not wear whatsoever.

Anyway, the 10% ethanol in pump gas (common everyday automotive fuel) lessens exhaust emissions. Plus, the alcohol content boosts the octane, making it somewhat of a high-performance fuel. The lead content in race gas (VP, Turbo Blue, Sunoco, Torco, etc.) boosts the octane also, except it's alcohol-free to pass the tech fuel test for tractor pulling. And the valve seat(s) that's ground in a cast iron block in a pulling engine burning 87 octane unleaded regular gas should last a long time, no longer than the tractor runs down the track (2-3 minutes per pull). They're not being driven a long distance, like in a car or truck.

Average Octane Rating of Various Fuels -
  • Regular unleaded automotive gasoline w/10% ethanol: 87 octane.
  • Premium unleaded automotive gasoline w/10% ethanol: 91-92 octane.
  • Leaded aviation gas (piston engine airplane fuel): 100 octane.
  • E85: 105 octane.
  • Leaded race gas (VP, Turbo Blue, Sunoco, Torco, etc.): 110 octane.
  • Hydrogen fuel: 130 octane (approximate).
  • 100% methanol: 135 octane.
  • LP or Propane Gas: Between 100 to 110 octane.


E-85 Fuel Using E85 Fuel in a Garden Tractor or Lawn & Garden Equipment -

What is E85? E85 is the term for motor fuel blends (special blend of automotive fuel) of 85% ethanol (corn alcohol AKA "moonshine") and 15% gasoline. E85 is an alternative fuel as defined by the U.S. Department of Energy. Besides its superior performance characteristics, ethanol burns cleaner than pure gasoline; it is a completely renewable, domestic, environmentally friendly fuel that enhances the nation's economy and energy independence. The addition of ethanol boosts octane and, because it is an oxygenate, ethanol contributes to a more complete fuel combustion resulting in reduced emissions of carbon monoxide and other ozone-forming emissions. Ethanol also degrades quickly in water and, therefore, poses much less risk to the environment than an oil or gasoline spill. To learn more about E85, visit this web site: National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition (http://www.e85fuel.com).

Fueling with E85 is not only beneficial to the environment, you'll most likely see a small increase in performance, which will be accompanied by a small decrease in fuel economy. On average, when an engine is powered by E85, the engine will have about 5% more horsepower and a 10% drop in fuel-efficiency. The added power comes from ethanol's higher (105) octane rating. The fuel economy decrease comes from the fact that ethanol has a lower energy content than gasoline, which means the engine will have to use more of it.

E85 can be used in virtually any gas engine fuel system, new or old. The only problem is, the rubber-like fuel hose, seals and gaskets in the fuel system may deteriorate due to the alcohol content in E85. But if the fuel system has neoprene rubber or synthetic rubber parts, there should be no problems. E85 works great for pulling competition, general yard use or for any small engine equipment. It'll create less carbon build up in the combustion chamber, too. I've reworked lots of carburetors for people who use their garden tractor just to mow grass with and they love how the E85 produces more power. Their only complaint is the engine burns more fuel. But that's the sacrifice for more power. If an engine is converted correctly, E85 will cause no problems with engine wear or fuel system deterioration. Basically, all that needs to be done to the engine is the main jet and fuel inlet (float valve) hole in the carburetor will need to be made about 80% bigger and the ignition timing will need to be advanced about 20% more. If the main jet isn't enlarged, the engine probably won't run on E85, or if it does, it will run too lean on fuel, overheat the engine, possibly damage the valves, piston and piston rings because of the excessive operating temperature. And if the timing isn't advanced enough to thoroughly burn the [slower burning] E85 fuel, some of it will exit out the exhaust unburned, with no increase in power.

No special motor oil is required with E85. But with prolonged idling, the oil may need to be changed more often. The 20% increase in the main jet and fuel inlet holes, and ignition timing applies to virtually all small engine carburetors and engines, despite the make or manufacturer.

E85 can be purchased at select gas stations in the U.S. It cost less per gallon than regular unleaded gasoline. And an engine will burn about 20% more fuel than gas with E85, but it'll also produce about 10% more power, operate cooler, have a cleaner combustion chamber and the engine will last longer.

On the 7hp and 8hp Kohler K-series and Magnum engines, with the Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 carburetor, the hole in the main jet for 100% gasoline measures exactly 3/64" (.046") in diameter. To convert these carburetors for use with E85, enlarge the main jet and fuel inlet (float valve) holes with a 5/64" or #47 (.078") drill bit. NOTE: Drill the fuel inlet from the inside out (opposite flow of fuel) to prevent a burr that may cause the carburetor to leak fuel or flood out. For accuracy, use a small metal lathe to drill the hole bigger. The ignition timing will also need to be advanced to 24 degrees BTDC so the engine will take full advantage and make maximum power of the slower burning, higher octane fuel. Then with the engine running at 3,600 rpm, adjust the high-speed fuel mixture needle valve so the engine runs smooth.

On the 10hp-16hp flathead single- and twin-cylinder Kohler K-series and Magnum engines with the older Carter or Kohler carburetors, the factory hole in the main jet size for 100% gasoline measures exactly 1/16" (.0625") in diameter. To convert these carburetors for use with E85, enlarge the main jet and fuel inlet (float valve) holes with a 3/32" or #42 (.094") drill bit. NOTE: Drill the fuel inlet from the inside out (opposite flow of fuel) to prevent a burr that may cause the carburetor to leak fuel or flood out. For accuracy, use a small metal lathe to drill the hole bigger. The ignition timing will also need to be advanced to 24 degrees BTDC so the engine will make full advantage and make maximum power of the slower burning, higher octane fuel. Then with the engine running at 3,600 rpm, adjust the high-speed air/fuel mixture needle valve until the engine runs smoothly.

To convert virtually any 4-cycle engine to run and produce full power on E85 fuel...

  1. If an OEM factory [restrictive] air filter assembly is going be used, drill the main jet and fuel inlet (float valve) holes to 35% bigger than their original size. For an engine that's going to use a less restrictive air filter assembly or no air filter at all, drill the holes to 40% bigger than their original size. To calculate the size hole that needs to be drilled, with a calculator, multiply the exact diameter of the main jet and fuel inlet hole by 135 (with factory air filter) or 140 (with less restrictive or no filter), hit the percent (%) key, which shows the approximate size drill bit to use. NOTE: If the fuel inlet hole itself isn't made bigger, when pulling down the track at wide open throttle, as soon as the float bowl fills with fuel, the engine will suck it dry, and as the engine winds down due to the lack of fuel, this allows more fuel to get dumped into the bowl and the process repeats itself over and over. The engine will run up and down, up and down, etc.
  2. Advance the ignition timing to 20% more than the stock setting. If the OEM timing is 20° BTDC, advance it to 24° BTDC. (20 x 120 = 24) If the timing isn't advanced at all or advanced enough, some of the alcohol content will exit out the exhaust unburned and the engine won't produce full power.
  3. Increase the fuel flow with a low-pressure electric fuel pump. If an insufficient amount of alcohol is delivered to the carburetor, the engine will run like it's starving for fuel. The engine will run up and down, up and down, etc.
  4. And that's it. The engine should run cooler, produce about 10% more power, but it'll burn 30-40% more fuel! NOTE: In cool weather, starting fluid (ether) may need to be sprayed into the carburetor throttle bore just to get the engine started.


The Advantages of Using 100% Methanol Fuel -

If the carburetor have been reworked and the ignition timing are adjusted and set correctly, methanol can produce up to 13% increase in horsepower. If the fuel is set slightly rich (which it should be), there's no need to constantly adjust the carburetor settings and/or ignition timing to compensate for changes in hot or cold weather conditions. Because of its low volatile octane rating (ability to burn quick), methanol shouldn't be used for general yard use. It's primarily a high-performance fuel only, and should be used only in a high-performance engine. Starting fluid (ether) or gasoline may need to be sprayed or squirted into the carburetor to get the engine started in cooler weather, though. And, faster gearing may be needed because of the increase in horsepower and torque.

It may take some experimentation to get a particular tractor to perform on methanol. Just because most experienced pullers get their tractors hooked-up good on it is no reason anyone else can't. Once one do get their tractor to perform on methanol, they'll be reluctant to go back to gas. By the way - methanol can be purchased at most places that sell racing fuels. And it cost less than 1/3 of racing gas fuels (per gallon).

Using Methanol in a Garden Pulling Tractor -

Methanol, also known as wood alcohol, is made primary from natural gas. And is the best high-performance fuel available. Far better than any expensive "racing" petroleum fuel. It'll help any 4-stroke high-performance engine produce more power and run much cooler. Methanol is a safe fuel to use, too. But if anyone feels uncomfortable using or converting an engine for use of methanol, please consult with a professional engine builder.

Methanol will mix equally with water and it evaporates quickly. The important thing to remember when storing methanol is the keep it in an air tight container in a dry place. Because it can easily draw moisture when stored for a long period, especially in a metal container. (Unlike plastic, steel gets cold, which draws condensation.) If one suspects that water had gotten into the methanol, it can be separated easily by using chamois leather. The chamois will absorb the water and allow the methanol to pass through. If gas has 10% alcohol, then the alcohol will mix the water with the gas and it will appear to have no water at all. The only way to separate the water from the gas and alcohol is through a chamois. Again, the chamois will absorb the water and allow the fuels to drain through.

If your club's sanctioning rules say that the methanol fuel must be able to pass a water test, then just use 100% pure methanol with no oil. (To some clubs, oil is also known as a "contaminant.") Pure methanol will remain clear in water, but turn cloudy in water when mixed with oil. And it's important that the main fuel mixture on the carburetor be richened slightly, to keep from burning the piston (because of the lack of oil in the fuel).

Methanol has no effect on rubber, neoprene rubber or OEM carburetor or fuel system parts nor does it get stale like gas does. But it will corrode aluminum as plain water does if it is not drained and allowed to evaporate from the fuel system over an extended length of time.

Because methanol will ignite only in a narrow range of high temperatures, it is less likely to catch on fire should an accident occur. If methanol does catch on fire, water can extinguish the flames, unlike a gasoline fire.

Methanol burns much slower than the highest octane gasoline. (It has about 135 octane rating.) Therefore, the ignition timing must be advanced more than for gas when burning methanol. If the timing isn't advanced enough, some of the methanol will go unburned and little will be gained. Modifications to the point lobe on the camshaft may need to be made in order to achieve the full ignition timing setting. Methanol also requires a hotter spark. Therefore, a high-output/performance ignition coil is needed, along with a wide spark plug gap (.060"). NOTE - Never run over-advanced ignition timing with any petroleum-based fuel (gas) just to try to get "more power." All that does is seriously overheat the engine and could weaken (collapse) the piston rings, shrink the piston, warp the cylinder head and exhaust valve and it could even cause the engine block to crack.

Details of the Cylinder Restraint System As methanol burns, it produces tremendous combustion chamber pressures under wide-open throttle conditions, especially in engines that's been ported, with oversized valves and a big cam, and even more so during cooler weather. To prevent possible cylinder/crankcase separation or an "engine explosion," the cylinder must be securely "strapped" or fastened to the crankcase. Especially on 12hp engines and up. So strap it now, or scrap it later! Methanol works best in a high compression engine, too.

"Strapping" the cylinder to the crankcase is when a flat piece of heavy steel or aluminum is across the cylinder head and fastened by means of two minimum 1/2" diameter threaded rods, one located just behind the flywheel and the other on the PTO end of the block. It keeps the cylinder from literately breaking loose from the crankcase because of a thin cylinder wall and/or due to extremely high compression.

Moreover, if you had a 10hp block bored for a 12hp piston, or a 12hp block bored for a 14hp piston, and you use your tractor to push snow, definitely strap the cylinder to the crankcase! Because it now has a much thinner cylinder wall, and the cold winter air is more dense (like the air is thicker or there's more of it). Dense air will build up the compression pressure within the combustion chamber, causing the engine to produce more power. But what also happens is at full throttle, this high compression is pushing upward on the cylinder head, and pulling upward on the cylinder wall. And sometimes the cylinder wall will break, ruining the whole engine. I know, I've seen this happen to a good engine. No joke.

Methanol produces a "cooling effect" as it enters an engine at high velocity (high rpm). And, it's a clean burning fuel, it won't carbon up the combustion chamber, foul-out the spark plug or even harm the ozone layer. The crankcase motor oil may need to be changed periodically though.

Here's another thing concerning methanol fuel - when it evaporates, it leaves behind very small particles of white, flaky calcium deposits in the fuel system. Which is normal and unavoidable. These deposits can clog and ruin a good fuel filter, but will not harm the engine or any other part of the fuel system. So to keep from having any [future] fuel flow problems, don't install a fuel filter. Instead, strain the fuel with a filtering material, such as a paint filter, coffee filter, fine mesh screen wire, clean cloth shop towel or fine woven window curtain, before it is poured into the fuel tank. Place the filtering material in a wide-mouth funnel, and pour the fuel through it into the tank. If there are any very small particles of dirt present in the fuel, they should pass right through the carburetor, being the jets have been enlarged.

The above È also works great if you have some "questionable" dirty gas, and the gas is still fresh. At the price of gas nowadays, this would be better than throwing it out.

Fuel filters can only filter so much of a grain of dirt. Anything smaller will pass right through, most of time causing no harm. Sometimes a hair will pass through a wire mesh fuel filter, lodging in the float valve, keeping it closing all the way because it can't get past the bend. It'll cause the carburetor to flood overnight. I've seen this happen a few times. On certain small engines, the flooding gas will seep down into the motor oil, ruining it. Briggs & Stratton riding mower engines are notorious for this. All you can do is clean out the carburetor and hope it doesn't happen again. And if there's enough fresh gas in the crankcase, sometimes the crankcase will explode if the engine backfires through the carburetor. The backfire flame will sometimes travel through the valve cover and into the crankcase.

METHANOL vs GAS -

Most garden tractor carburetors can be easily converted for methanol use. The main thing to keep in mind is that methanol requires about twice the volume of fuel than gas. (Approximately a 5-6:1 ratio for methanol versus 10-12:1 ratio for gas). To run methanol, the main jet and fuel inlet (float valve) holes will need to be enlarged to about 95% of their original size.

High compression engines naturally operate at a higher operating temperature. When using low octane gasoline (Regular Unleaded or 87 octane rating) in a high compression engine, the octane of the gas is reduced by 1 point for every 10º above the normal operating combustion chamber temperature that it is formulated for. This will cause the gas to burn faster. When trying to restart a high compression overheated engine on low octane gas, what is happening is the gas is burning quickly and entirely in the combustion chamber, and producing expanding heat before the piston reaches TDC, driving the piston back down in the cylinder before it reaches TDC. This is the cause of detonation (pounding of the piston) and it'll cause the engine to "grunt" or momentarily make the crankshaft rotate in the opposite direction (but the weight of the flywheel prevents this from happening). Overheating could also crack the [cast iron] cylinder, shrink the piston, burn a hole in the piston (detonation) and weaken the expansion of the piston rings. Methanol fuel has an octane rating of 135. This is why methanol works best in a high-performance, high compression engine.

Did you know that high octane gas or "race car gas" (approximately 109-110 octane) is much better than any filling station pump gas when used in a high-performance engine? Higher octane gas burns slow, producing more heat, thus allowing an engine to develop more power. Because heat is how an engine produces power. Methanol fuel produces even more heat than gas does.

Methanol never gets stale while setting around. It's burning factors (the qualities that produce power) remain intact until all of the fuel evaporates. Gasoline on the other hand, as it gets old or stale, it's burning factors is the first thing to go. Unlike methanol, eventually all that is left of the old gas is some "foul smelling residue." Methanol never smells "old."

If the air/fuel ratio isn't properly adjusted with both methanol or gasoline, possible engine damage may result. If either fuel is leaned-out too much, possible piston to cylinder wall scuffing, scoring or even seizure may result. If methanol is ran too rich, the oil on the cylinder wall may be diluted, causing excessive wear to the piston, rings and sometimes the cylinder wall. And if gas is ran too rich, loss in power may result with possible spark plug fouling. (Methanol is more forgiving to an engine than gas.)

A high-performance cam, larger piston, big valves and a bigger carburetor will undoubtedly help gas-burning engines develop more power. But only from the use of the parts themselves. Methanol on the other hand, will help give an engine a little more boost. Simply from the fuel itself.

Engines will consume less fuel burning gas than methanol. Something good for gas and not for methanol. Which is why methanol is not used on the open market in daily driven automobiles.

Some racing gasolines could eventually cause an engine to wear prematurely when used under high-performance conditions (and if the ignition timing is over-advanced). Piston wear, piston ring expansion failure, valve warping, even motor oil breakdown could result over time due to the high operating temperatures of gas in a high compression engine. (Especially on air cooled engines with no cooling system.)

An engine runs cooler burning methanol than gas. The reason why? Approximately twice the amount of methanol fuel enters an engine. There's more fuel per parts of air. As a result, this allows an engine to operate at a much cooler temperature. Gasoline on the other hand, runs less fuel per parts of air. Therefore, it's a "lean" burning fuel. Gas allows a high-compression engine to operate at a higher temperature. Which in turn could cause premature engine wear. Simply because too much heat itself will cause a good engine to wear out faster than anything else.

For more information on methanol, click here: Erowid Alcohol Vault : Methanol Material Safety Data Sheet and Race fuel - Alcohol fuels.

100% ethanol (moonshine) and denatured alcohol burns pretty much the same as 100% methanol. There's very little difference between these alcohol fuels. If an engine is converted correctly for use with these fuels, it will produce the same amount of power, run cooler and last longer.

On the K90, K141, K160, K161, K181/M8 Kohler K-series and Magnum engines, with the Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 carburetor, the hole in the main jet size for 100% gasoline measures exactly 3/64" (.046") in diameter. To convert these carburetors for use with methanol, enlarge the main jet and fuel inlet (float valve) holes with a 3/32" (.094") diameter drill bit. NOTE: Drill the fuel inlet from the inside out (opposite flow of fuel), to prevent a burr that may cause the carburetor to leak fuel or flood. For best accuracy, use a small metal lathe to drill the hole. The ignition timing will also need to be advanced to 30 degrees BTDC so the engine will take full advantage and make maximum power of the slower burning, higher octane fuel. Then with the engine running at 3,600 rpm, adjust the high-speed fuel mixture needle valve so the engine runs smooth.

On the 10hp-16hp single- and twin-cylinder Kohler K-series and Magnum engines Carter or Kohler carburetors with the fully adjustable high speed main jet, the factory hole in the main jet size for 100% gasoline measures exactly 1/16" (.0625") in diameter. To convert these carburetors for use with methanol, the main jet and fuel inlet (float valve) holes will also need to be enlarged with a 7/64" (.109") drill bit. NOTE: Drill the fuel inlet from the inside out (opposite flow of fuel), to prevent a burr that may cause the carburetor to leak fuel or flood. For best accuracy, use a small metal lathe to drill the hole. The ignition timing will also need to be advanced to 30 degrees BTDC so the engine will take full advantage and make maximum power of the slower burning, higher octane fuel. Then if it's a stock engine, with the engine running at 3,600 rpm, adjust the high-speed air/fuel mixture needle valve until the engine runs smoothly.

To convert virtually any 4-cycle engine to run and produce full power on 100% denatured alcohol, ethanol or methanol fuels...

  1. If an OEM factory [restrictive] air filter assembly is going be used, drill the main jet and fuel inlet (float valve) holes to 40% bigger than their original size. For an engine that's going to use a less restrictive air filter assembly or no air filter at all, drill the holes to 50% bigger than their original size. To calculate the size hole that needs to be drilled, with a calculator, multiply the exact diameter of the main jet and fuel inlet hole by 140 (with factory air filter) or 150 (with less restrictive or no filter), hit the percent (%) key (%) key, which shows the approximate size drill bit to use. NOTE: If the fuel inlet hole itself isn't made bigger, when pulling down the track at wide open throttle, as soon as the float bowl fills with fuel, the engine will suck it dry, and as the engine winds down due to the lack of fuel, this allows more fuel to get dumped into the bowl and the process repeats itself over and over. The engine will run up and down, up and down, etc.
  2. Advance the ignition timing to 50% more than the stock setting. If the OEM timing is 20° BTDC, advance it to 30° BTDC. (20 x 150 = 30) If the timing isn't advanced at all or advanced enough, some of the alcohol will exit out the exhaust unburned and the engine won't produce full power.
  3. Increase the fuel flow with a low-pressure electric fuel pump. If an insufficient amount of alcohol is delivered to the carburetor, the engine will run like it's starving for fuel. The engine will run up and down, up and down, etc.
  4. And that's it! The engine should run cooler, produce about 13% more power, but it'll burn 40-50% more fuel! NOTE: In cool weather, starting fluid (ether) may need to be sprayed into the carburetor throttle bore just to get the engine started.


Testing Methanol Fuel for Contaminants - (Updated 1/20/11)
IMPORTANT! It's a good idea to use a small amount of special upper cylinder lubricant (such as Lucas Oil, M2 Upper Lube & Lead Additive, Marvel Mystery Oil, etc.) mixed with methanol to prevent possible piston-to-cylinder scoring and to help lubricate the valve stems and guides. If a lubricant isn't used and if methanol is ran too lean (especially in cool weather), this could ruin a good high-dollar piston and possibly score the cylinder wall. Methanol must be ran rich if no lubricant is mixed with it. But some sanctioning pulling rules (such as the NQS) don't allow lubricant to be mixed with methanol because it boosts the octane and will likely fail in a fuel test, which means the tractor will be disqualified after competing. The more oil that is added, the higher the octane will be.

When pulling under rules that require 100% methanol fuel, and if a tractor have been using methanol with a lubricant, be sure to completely drain and flush the entire fuel system. Use [150± psi] compressed air to clear out the fuel tank, fuel hose, fuel pump, carburetor, etc. Because any trace amount of lubricant remaining will mix with the methanol and be cause for failure in a fuel test. Some new neoprene rubber fuel hoses contains oil. This means if 100% methanol is supposed to be used, the fuel hose must be flushed with a solvent (paint thinner), then use [150± psi] compressed air to clear it out, and then allow it to thoroughly air-dry.

Methanol by itself is clear, like water. To test it for an added lubricant, pour a small amount of methanol in a clean, clear capped glass container with a small amount of oil, then shake it. If it appears "cloudy," it's contaminated. You can also smell methanol for contaminants.

The Fuel Rule for the 2013 NQS Classes Are As Follows:

All tractors in all classes are to run methanol, with no additives (except for diesel fueled tractors). There are two U.S. Federal Grades. Grade A and AA. Either grade is permitted to use. Pullers should ensure that the methanol they purchase meets federal standards of purity. Methanol is tested at all NQS events by various chemical analyses as considered appropriate by the NQS Fuel Tech personnel. Deviation from the standards listed below in the fuel sample will result in disqualification. Methanol is a hygroscopic substance and readily absorbs moisture from the air, which rapidly renders methanol illegal as a fuel for use in NQS pulling. Pullers are cautioned to keep methanol containers tightly sealed at all times to minimize the absorption of water.


I remember when gasoline for certain automotive engines was for the following compression ratios: Anything up to 9.25:1, it was okay to use Regular (low octane); between 9.25-10.5:1 required Premium (mid octane); and anything above 10.5:1 required Ethyl (high octane). I'd also like to share this old gas station joke: Car owner: "Fill 'er up... Ethyl!" Gas station attendant: "I'll fill up your car, but don't call me Ethel."

Using a Gravity Feed Fuel Flow System -

When burning gas only (not methanol) and if an engine is going to turn no faster than approximately 4,000 rpm (governed limit; the factory setting of maximum rpm for virtually all small gas engines, including all of Kohler engines is 3,600), then a gravity feed fuel system with the gas tank positioned higher than the carburetor, stock fuel fittings and fuel hose should work fine. (Gravity feed is defined as when the lowest part of the gas tank is positioned higher than the carburetor, and there's no fuel pump involved.)

If the gas tank sets higher than the carburetor, and if a large i.d. fuel hose and fittings are used, and if the float level is set a little high, then a gravity feed fuel system should work great for a stock engine turning no more than 4,000 rpm. But a vacuum-operated (or pulse-type), mechanical or electric fuel pump will guarantee that the carburetor will not starve for fuel about halfway down the track. Also, carefully enlarge the fuel inlet valve seat hole to 7/64" (.109"). This will allow more delivery of fuel in the float bowl so the engine will not starve for fuel halfway down the track. Be sure to set the float a little high too, so as it drops down, the fuel inlet valve will open more, allowing more fuel to be deposited in the float bowl.

FYI - All vacuum-operated fuel pumps operate off of the crankcase pressure. The moving piston(s) inside the crankcase of the engine create the pulsating effect to activate the pump's diaphragm. And all crankcase-pulse, vacuum-operated fuel pumps come with three fittings - one that connects to the crankcase of the engine block and an IN and OUT fuel hose fittings. It should say on the body of the pump where each fitting connects to. But if it doesn't, then the fitting coming from the center of the pump connects to the crankcase vent. And the other two fittings, one connect to the gas tank and the other connects to the carburetor.

If an engine in an ATV or UTV sputters and/or dies after going over rough terrain, this could be caused by a defective vacuum-operated fuel pump. Overtime, the fuel pump bodies become warped and oil in the crankcase is preventing air from working the diaphragm the way it should. If the engine has a 12 volt electrical system with a charging system, it'll be better to install a low pressure electric fuel pump. (Listed further down in this web site.) These rarely give trouble.

To test a plastic crankcase-pulse, vacuum-operated fuel pump, first check that the fuel hose (hose) between the gas tank and fuel pump is open and unobstructed, or if it has dry-rot cracks, which can cause a vacuum leak. To test it, disconnect the fuel hose from the fuel pump and wrap a shop/business towel or clean rag around an air blower nozzle and then insert the nozzle with the rag or towel in the gas tank filler neck. Apply light air pressure in the tank. If fuel comes out of the fuel hose, then it's open. After that, reconnect the fuel hose to the fuel pump. To test the fuel pump itself, first check the hose that connects the fuel pump to the engine crankcase to see if it has a kink in it or if it has dry-rot cracks, which can also cause a vacuum leak. If it's in good condition, then the final step is to disconnect the fuel hose from the carburetor and with adequate amount of fuel in the gas tank, crank the engine and at the same time observe how much fuel is being pumped out of the pump. If there seems to be adequate amount of fuel coming from it, hold your finger over the end of the line and while still cranking the engine, it should build up a small amount of pressure. If none or very little fuel comes out of the pump, then it's bad and needs replacing.

When a vacuum-operated fuel pump fails to pump fuel, in most cases, the body of the fuel pump will become warped, causing a vacuum leak either from within or from the outside, preventing the diaphragm from pulsating. If the diaphragm is still flexible, chances are, the pump can be repaired by resurfacing the body halves on a flat sanding disc until they're perfectly flat again.


What Exactly Is "Vapor Lock"?

Vapor lock only happens with certain older carbureted cars and trucks with a mechanical fuel pump that's fastened to the engine block. Vapor lock occurs when the [metal] gas line is too close to the hot exhaust, and when the vehicle is in slow traffic, the fuel is moving very slow in the line. Due to extreme heat from the exhaust and on a hot day, and the fan blade not blowing that much air past the exhaust, sometimes the heat will cause the gas to boil, forming air bubbles or air pockets, and the fuel vaporizes, and then the fuel pump can't pump vaporized fuel (air). So as soon as the carburetor runs out of fuel, the engine stalls. The fuel pump will "lock" with vapors trapped inside it. When the vehicle cools, incoming gas will force the air out of the fuel pump and through the carburetor, allowing the fuel to return to the pump, and then the engine will start and run again. This don't happen nowadays with automobiles having fuel injection because the entire fuel hose is pressurized.

But on lawn tractors or garden tractors, the fuel hose is located nowhere near the hot exhaust. What is really happening when the engine stalls, is either the fuel system is dirty, the ignition coil is bad, or there's insufficient valve to lifter clearance.


Using a Mechanical Fuel Pump -

Mechanical plastic and metal body fuel pumps are very durable and they work pretty well, for both yard machines and stock competitive pulling with gas. The diaphragm or gaskets rarely goes bad in the mechanical fuel pumps. It's usually one or both of the poppet valves that goes bad. They can become dislodged, or rusted or corroded from long term water contamination. If the poppet valves are in good condition, and if the pump doesn't pump fuel, then in most cases, the fuel pump body halves become warped, creating a vacuum leak. The halves can be resurfaced on a flat sanding disc until perfectly flat and then the pump should work as good as a new one. (I use the side of the cutting wheel on my 14" chop saw. Works great! Be sure to use eye protection!) If it's a plastic body pump, be sure to use a deburring tool after sanding and thoroughly clean all parts with [150± psi] compressed air before reassembly! If this doesn't fix the problem, then perhaps a new or used reconditioned pump is in order.

To test the fuel pump for fuel flow off the engine, submerge the inlet port in a container of clean (filtered) cleaning solvent (paint thinner) and then work the lever quickly by hand. The solvent should squirt forcibly out the outlet port. If the pump doesn't start pumping right away, submerge the entire fuel pump in the solvent and work the lever to prime it and remove the air internally. After checking to see how well it works, to test the psi, a low-pressure gauge can be connected to the outlet port. The pressure should be 1-½ to 2 psi. To increase the pressure to about 2-½ psi (maximum), disassemble the pump and physically stretch the diaphragm pressure spring until it's about 3/4" longer than original length. To increase the volume (more fuel flow), the stroke of the fuel pump lobe on the camshaft would need to be lengthened approximately 1/8" by welding it up on the high side and reground deeper on the low side. Or better yet, use an electric fuel pump.

The only problem when using a gasket to fasten the fuel pump to the block is, being the mounting flange is so thin, it will warp over time, causing an oil leak. (This happens to every pump I've seen.) To fix this, and to [possibly] prevent an oil leak in the future, completely disassemble the pump, remove the lever and arm (be careful not to lose the spring) and use a flat sanding disc to resurface the mounting flange until it's perfectly flat. The trick to reinstalling the spring is, reinstall the arm, lever and support pin in the pump body first, then install the spring with a small, flat screwdriver. (The pumps with the primer lever is harder to reassemble.) To keep the flange from warping again, fasten it directly to the block using only Clear RTV Silicone Adhesive Sealant and no gasket. And install a flat washer (and of course, a split lock washer) under each mounting screw head to distribute even pressure on the flange and to prevent the screws from loosening. By the way - I've always preferred to use Clear RTV Silicone Adhesive Sealant for two reasons: being it's an adhesive, it bonds parts together, forming a leak-proof seal; and being it's clear, it makes for a clean-looking repair job. It can't be seen between the parts.

FYI - All of Kohler's 10-16hp flatheads and the OHV 18hp engines come with a lobe on the cam to activate the mechanical fuel pump. The fuel pump installs with the lever positioned upwards. And if there's no provision for mounting a mechanical fuel pump, a 3/4" center hole and two small threaded bolt holes will need to be drilled, and the mounting holes tapped for 1/4-20 NC threads. Use a fuel pump mounting gasket as a templet.

When running a pulling engine at wide open throttle, sometimes the engine will starve for fuel with gravity feed fuel system. Therefore, Kohler's camshaft-driven mechanical fuel pump or a low-pressure electric fuel pump should be used to guarantee that the carburetor will receive plenty of fuel at all times. The mechanical pump should be used on a pulling tractor when burning gas only. They're not capable of delivering sufficient amount of fuel with E85 or methanol at high rpms like an electric pump will.

Troubleshooting a Faulty Vacuum-Operated or Mechanical Fuel Pump -

If an engine sits for about one week or longer, if the fuel in the carburetor evaporates and it's hard to start, or fuel must be squirted into the carburetor to get the engine started, then this means that the vacuum-operated or mechanical fuel pump may be bad. The inlet valve in the pump is leaking, which is allowing the fuel to drain back into the gas tank with the engine off. As the pump tries to syphon fuel from the tank to refill the carburetor, it's unable because the inlet valve is bad. Solution: a new fuel pump will need to be installed. When a vacuum or mechanical fuel pump quits working, below Ê are the causes:
  • Poppet valve dislodged inside pump. (This happens often.)
    • Solution: Reinstall valve in cavity and peen metal or plastic around it. If it won't stay in place, the only option is acquire another fuel pump.
  • Gasket/diaphragm mating surfaces on pump halves warped, causing vacuum leak and/or external gas leak.
    • Solution: Resurface on a flat sanding disc until perfectly flat.
  • Corrosion due to contamination with water.
    • Solution: Acquire another fuel pump.
  • Damaged diaphragm or gasket(s). This is rare, and there'll be presence of gas in crankcase oil.
    • Solution: Being no rebuild kits are available, the only option is acquire another fuel pump.
  • Cracked (split) threads in inlet or outlet ports.
    • Solution: Acquire another fuel pump.

Advertisement:
If you need any of the items listed below Ê, please contact A-1 Miller's Performance Enterprises | 1501 W. Old Plank Rd. | Columbia, MO 65203-9136 USA | Phone: 1-573-875-4033. Please call Monday-Friday (except Holidays), 9am to 5pm, Central time zone. If no answer, please try again later. (When speaking with Brian, please be patient because I stutter.) Fax: 1-573-449-7347. E-mail: pullingtractor@aol.com. You can also contact us through Yahoo! Messenger: Find us here: Directions to our shop | Yahoo! Maps, 1501 W. Old Plank Rd., Columbia, MO | 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO - Google Maps or Map of 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO by MapQuest. Go here for more parts: Carburetor, Fuel System Parts & Machine Shop Services | NOTE: To place an order, please call or send an email with a list and description of the parts or services you need. Because as of right now, we're not set up to accept orders through our web sites online.
New mechanical plastic body "new style" fuel pump for Kohler K90 (3.6hp), K91 (4hp), K141 (6¼hp), K160 (6.6hp), K161 (7hp) and K181/M8 (8hp) K-series and Magnum (flathead) single cylinder cast iron block engines. New pumps with thread-in fittings and primer lever are no longer available. Kohler part # 41 559 05-S.
  • Aftermarket. $55.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $95.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
Mechanical plastic body "new style" fuel pump for Kohler K-series and Magnum models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K330/K331 (12½hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 (16hp) flatheads and K361 (18hp OHV) single cylinder cast iron block engines. New pumps with thread-in fittings and primer lever are no longer available. Kohler part # 47 559 11-S.
  • Reconditioned and tested OEM Kohler part. (Plastic or metal body.) $25.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.]
  • New aftermarket. $40.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • New OEM Kohler part. $136.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
Mechanical plastic body "new style" fuel pump for Kohler models KT-17, KT-19, M15, MV16, M18, MV18, M20 and MV20 Magnum series flathead twin cylinder engines. New pumps with thread-in fittings are no longer available. Kohler part # 52 559 03-S.
  • Reconditioned and tested OEM Kohler part. $25.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.]
  • New aftermarket. $50.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $80.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
Mechanical plastic body "new style" fuel pump for Kohler engine models K482, K532 and K582 twin cylinder flathead engines. New pumps with the primer lever are no longer available. Kohler part # 48 559 05-S.
  • Aftermarket. $80.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $130.50 each, plus shipping & handling.

Fuel Pump Mounting Gasket. Kohler part # 25 041 10-S.

  • Aftermarket. .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $1.55 each, plus shipping & handling.
Coming Soon! A-1 Miller's own CNC-machined Aluminum Fuel Pump Hole Block-Off Plates. Projected price: $10.00 each, plus shipping & handling.

Fuel Pump Hole Block-Off Plate. Made of 1/8" mild steel. OEM Kohler part # 240282-S.

  • $5.75 each, plus shipping & handling.
Fuel Pump Mounting Screws. 1/4-20 NC threads x 3/4" long. Phillips head. Comes with split lock washer. Kohler part # X-174-2-S.
  • Aftermarket. .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $1.55 each, plus shipping & handling.

When to Use an Electric Fuel Pump -

One nice thing about electric fuel pumps besides they're very reliable, is that they're self-priming. Meaning when an engine runs out of gas, the engine won't have to be cranked a lot (making yourself tired from a rope starter, or risk burning up an electric starter from excessive cranking) waiting for a vacuum or mechanical pump to put gas to the carburetor. As soon as the ignition is turned on (if the electric pump is wired in with the ignition circuit), the electric pump instantly puts gas to the carburetor.

Low Pressure Electric/Electronic Fuel PumpsAn electric fuel pump that requires no fuel regulator and works great on virtually any garden tractor engine or up to a 4 cylinder automotive engine with a carburetor is the Facet-Purolator Automotive Electronic Fuel Pump. Facet's part number is FEP 42SV, and Purolator's part numbers are PRO 42S (1.5 - 4 p.s.i.) or PRO 42SV (2 - 3.5 p.s.i.). There's also a Mr. Gasket 42S low pressure universal electric fuel pump, and another electric fuel pump is available at NAPA auto parts stores. It's part # 6101051 (which is actually a FACET # 610-1051 electric pump), and is called a POSI-FLO fuel pump. Specifications are: 12 Volts; 1.5-4 PSI; 25 gal./hr.; compatible with all fuel additives; eliminates vapor lock; two wire design and self-priming. When searching the NAPA auto parts web site, use part # BK 6101051. Low pressure electric fuel pumps are also available on eBay.

The Facet-Purolator pumps are compact, vibration-proof (has solid state dependability), self-priming, easy to install and connect the wiring. They work with either gas, E85 or methanol fuels, won't flood the carburetor, draw very little amperage from the battery, and they cost less than most OEM electric fuel pumps. They're available at most auto parts stores and on eBay. They're perfect for garden tractors having either a single- or two-cylinder engine!

When burning E85 or methanol fuels, more fuel volume (increase in flow) is required and an electric fuel pump should be used. The carburetor on most garden tractor engines don't require a lot of fuel pressure.

An electric fuel pump that's made for an import car/truck produce more flow than any of Kohler's mechanical pumps, and in most cases, they don't produce not enough pressure to flood the carburetor. With some high-pressure electric fuel pumps however, an adjustable fuel pressure regulator with a fuel gauge may need to be used in-line. Install a "T" in the fuel hose and connect the gauge between the fuel pump or fuel regulator and carburetor. To begin with, set the regulator at about 2-1/2 p.s.i. Make the final adjustment on the fuel pressure at wide open throttle, hooked to the sled, while going down the track. Use a quality fuel pressure gauge that can withstand the vibrations of a garden pulling tractor to monitor the pressure.

Another good thing about an electric fuel pump verses a mechanical pump (if the mechanical pump doesn't have a primer lever, which must be primed manually) is if an engine runs out of fuel, the engine will not have to be cranked for a long time to get the fuel pumped up to the carburetor, which can be hard on an electric starter motor.

When wiring up an electric fuel pump on the tractor with battery ignition, the pump should come with detailed instructions. But if there's no instructions, then connect one wire (usually black in color) to the chassis of the tractor (ground), and the other wire (usually red in color) to the ignition system. The wire going to the coil from the ignition switch is a good one to connect to. On a tractor with magneto ignition, use a separate OFF/ON toggle switch for the fuel pump.

How To Prepare a Fuel Pump for Wintertime or Long-Term Storage -

If the engine is equipped with an electric or mechanical fuel pump, squirt about a teaspoon-full of clean motor oil or automatic transmission fluid in the pump so the diaphragm will remain flexible or rotor vanes won't stick and to prevent the poppet valves from sticking or become corroded.


Advertisement:
If you need your Carter, Kohler or Walbro carburetor rebuilt for daily use or if you want your carburetor professionally reworked for high-performance use on a Stock, Stock-Altered or Pro-Stock tractor, or if you wish to buy a rebuilt carburetor, please contact A-1 Miller's Performance Enterprises | 1501 W. Old Plank Rd. | Columbia, MO 65203-9136 USA | Phone: 1-573-875-4033. Please call Monday-Friday (except Holidays), 9am to 5pm, Central time zone. If no answer, please try again later. (When speaking with Brian, please be patient because I stutter.) Fax: 1-573-449-7347. E-mail: pullingtractor@aol.com. You can also contact us through Yahoo! Messenger: Find us here: Directions to our shop | Yahoo! Maps, 1501 W. Old Plank Rd., Columbia, MO | 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO - Google Maps or Map of 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO by MapQuest. Go here for more parts: Carburetor, Fuel System Parts & Machine Shop Services | NOTE: To place an order, please call or send an email with a list and description of the parts or services you need. Because as of right now, we're not set up to accept orders through our web sites online.

FYI: I can professionally rebuild older vintage and antique carburetors virtually of any kind as well as newer ones, as long as replacement parts are available. I also have the capability to fabricate new throttle and choke shafts. Please contact us if you have any questions.


Carburetor Repairs - YOUR 10hp-18hp Carter, Kohler or Walbro carburetor: FYI - Many of my customers send me their carburetors for rebuilding, but lots of times I couldn't find anything wrong them. So I'd call my customers just before returning their carburetor asking how their engine acted. And after hearing their story, I told them that their engines might need a valve job performed instead. And lo and behold! Many of them either adjusted the valves or had a professional valve job performed and said that their engines ran like new. I'm not saying this happens with all engines, only the majority of them.

Modifications for the 10-18hp Kohler CarburetorBasic rebuild with no "high-performance" modifications whatsoever, according to the condition of the carburetor, the repair price is minimum $55.00 for parts and labor, plus return shipping & handling. This includes cleaning carburetor and installing a new overhaul kit. Any additional parts or services are an extra charge. Work includes whatever parts and services it may need that's listed below Ê. IMPORTANT: When sending your carburetor to me, please package it securely so it won't get damaged in shipping and include a note in the package with your name, complete mailing address, phone number (in case we have any questions), a description of what you want done, how the engine will be used and any other parts you may need. And be sure to enclose it in a sealed zip-lock sandwich bag to prevent the gas odor from escaping the package. If the odor of gas can still be smelled from outside the package, then apply perfume, cologne or Febreze® on the carburetor to disguise the smell of gas. Because the US Postal Service or other delivery services will not deliver any packages that smell like gas. And we'll call or email you when it's repaired.

Basic Rebuild Includes:

ü Completely disassemble and clean carburetor.
ü Resurface mounting flange and choke end to remove any warpage to prevent a vacuum leak.
ü Enlarge the lower hole on the high speed needle adjuster so the engine will start quicker and idle better.
ü Install new overhaul kit.
ü If needed, $25.00 extra to install a new bronze throttle shaft bushing.
ü If needed, machine carburetor body and install bronze sleeve bushings for worn choke shaft holes, reuse original choke shaft. $25.00 for new bronze bushings and labor.
ü If needed, repair stripped 10-32 NF air filter housing mounting threaded hole(s). $5.00 - $15.00 for parts and labor.
ü The idle speed and air/fuel mixture adjustments will be preset on the carburetor to get the engine running, but due to your altitude, you will need to make the final adjustments so the engine will run smooth.
ü Convert your carburetor for use with E85 or methanol fuels with the rebuild: no charge.

High-Performance Modification on Carter or Kohler #26, #28 or #30 carburetors for use with Gas, E85 or Methanol fuels - $85.00 labor, plus return shipping & handling. Work includes what's listed above È plus whatever parts and services it may need that's listed below Ê.

High-Performance Modifications Includes Everything Above È, Plus...

ü Bore venturi to a 1" limit (.995" NQS legal size), straight-through design (to match the diameter of throttle bore) or whatever your club's sanctioning rules allow. Read your rules carefully to make sure! I'll need a copy of your club's sanctioning rules regarding the legality of the carburetor, so when I rework it, it'll be legal for use in the class you plan to pull in.
ü Leave choke plate/shaft intact or remove them and plug shaft holes. If your rules require a working choke or if you wish to have a working choke, please let me know and I will not remove it.
ü Add $15.00 for converting to bottom main fuel adjuster.
ü Convert your carburetor for use with E85 or methanol fuels with the modification: no charge.
ü Missing, worn or broken parts are extra charge.

Professionally Rebuilt and New Carburetors For Sale - Note: I set the air/fuel adjusters on all carburetors that I rebuild somewhat close so the engine will start and run, but because of the attitude, air temperature and engine design, you'll need to make the final adjustments. And the carburetors that I sell come with a 30 day workmanship warranty and are guaranteed to be free of defects. Other carburetor services listed further down in the web site.
Carburetors for Kohler K-series K90 (3.6hp), K91 (4hp) flathead cast iron block engines. These are plain, stock carburetors that's been completely disassembled, thoroughly cleaned and rebuilt. All fuel passageways cleared, new parts and if necessary, a bushing and/or new throttle shaft installed. No performance modifications are made to these carburetors whatsoever. All rebuilt carburetors that we service and sell come with a 30 day workmanship warranty and are guaranteed to be free of defects. The idle speed and air/fuel mixture adjustments will be preset on the carburetor to get the engine running, but due to your altitude, you will need to make the final adjustments so the engine will run smooth. Carter carburetor part # G-220517. NOTE: Not all carburetor numbers are listed with Kohler.
  • Rebuilt #16 Carter carburetor outright. (Discontinued from Kohler.) $150.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] NOTE: Please don't discard your Carter or Kohler carburetor core. These are no longer made and are considered valuable nowadays. If not rebuildable, maybe the parts can be used on a good core.
  • Rebuilt #16 Carter carburetor with rebuildable core trade-in. $125.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] IMPORTANT: When sending your carburetor to me, please package it securely so it won't get damaged in shipping and include a note in the package with your name, complete mailing address, phone number (in case I have any questions), a description of what you want done, how the engine will be used and any other parts you may need. And be sure to enclose it in a sealed zip-lock sandwich bag to prevent the gas odor from escaping the package. If the odor of gas can still be smelled from outside the package, then apply perfume, cologne or Febreze® on the carburetor to disguise the smell of gas. Because the US Postal Service or other delivery services will not deliver any packages that smell like gas. And we'll call or email you when it's repaired.
  • New #36 Walbro WHL carburetor (pictured below Ê) with adjustable high speed main jet. Comes with throttle linkage, mounting and air filter housing gaskets. OEM Kohler part # 46 853 01-S. $275.00 each outright, plus shipping & handling.
Carburetors for Kohler K-series and Magnum models K141 (6¼hp), K160 (6.6hp), K161 (7hp), K181/M8 (8hp) flathead cast iron block engines. These are plain, stock carburetors that's been completely disassembled, thoroughly cleaned and rebuilt. All fuel passageways cleared, new parts and if necessary, a bushing and/or new throttle shaft installed. No performance modifications are made to these carburetors whatsoever. All rebuilt carburetors that we service and sell come with a 30 day workmanship warranty and are guaranteed to be free of defects. The idle speed and air/fuel mixture adjustments will be preset on the carburetor to get the engine running, but due to your altitude, you will need to make the final adjustments so the engine will run smooth. Carter carburetor part #'s B-231739, C-231738, 41 053 01, 41 053 13, 41 053 18 or 41 053 20. NOTE: Not all carburetor numbers are listed with Kohler.
  • Rebuilt Carter #16, #18, #20 or #22 carburetor outright. (Discontinued from Kohler.) $150.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] NOTE: Please don't discard your Carter or Kohler carburetor core. These are no longer made and are considered valuable nowadays. If not rebuildable, maybe the parts can be used on a good core.
  • Rebuilt Carter #16, #18, #20 or #22 carburetor with rebuildable core trade-in. $125.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] IMPORTANT: When sending your carburetor to me, please package it securely so it won't get damaged in shipping and include a note in the package with your name, complete mailing address, phone number (in case I have any questions), a description of what you want done, how the engine will be used and any other parts you may need. And be sure to enclose it in a sealed zip-lock sandwich bag to prevent the gas odor from escaping the package. If the odor of gas can still be smelled from outside the package, then apply perfume, cologne or Febreze® on the carburetor to disguise the smell of gas. Because the US Postal Service or other delivery services will not deliver any packages that smell like gas. And we'll call or email you when it's repaired.
  • New Walbro WHL #44 carburetor (pictured below Ê) with adjustable high speed main jet. Comes with throttle linkage, mounting and air filter housing gaskets. Kohler part #'s 41 853 07-S, 41 853 11-S.
    • Aftermarket. $175.00 each outright, plus shipping & handling.
    • OEM Walbro/Kohler part. $312.60 each outright, plus shipping & handling.
Carburetors for Kohler K-series and Magnum models K241/M10 (10hp) and K301/M12 (12hp) flathead cast iron block engines. These are plain, stock carburetors that's been completely disassembled, thoroughly cleaned and rebuilt. All fuel passageways cleared, new parts and if necessary, a bushing and/or new throttle shaft installed. No performance modifications made to these carburetors whatsoever. Comes with choke plate installed. For gas or E85. Please indicate if for a Kohler "Quiet Line" engine with the oblong-shaped air filter housing housing, or for an engine with the round air filter housing housing. (The choke lever and air filter housing mounting holes are different.) No performance modifications are made to these carburetors whatsoever. All rebuilt carburetors that we service and sell come with a 30 day workmanship warranty and are guaranteed to be free of defects. The idle speed and air/fuel mixture adjustments will be preset on the carburetor to get the engine running, but due to your altitude, you will need to make the final adjustments so the engine will run smooth. Kohler carburetor part #'s 47 053 07, 47 053 08, 47 053 12, 47 053 13, 47 053 14, 47 053 24, 47 053 29, 47 053 40, 47 053 62 or 47 053 80. NOTE: Not all carburetor numbers are listed with Kohler. No numbers are available from any source for the Carter #26, #28 or #30 carburetors.
  • Rebuilt #26 Carter or Kohler carburetor outright. (Discontinued from Kohler.) $150.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] NOTE: Please don't discard your Carter or Kohler carburetor core. These are no longer made and are considered valuable nowadays. If not rebuildable, maybe the parts can be used on a good core.
  • Rebuilt #26 Carter or Kohler carburetor with rebuildable core trade-in. $125.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] IMPORTANT: When sending your carburetor to me, please package it securely so it won't get damaged in shipping and include a note in the package with your name, complete mailing address, phone number (in case I have any questions), a description of what you want done, how the engine will be used and any other parts you may need. And be sure to enclose it in a sealed zip-lock sandwich bag to prevent the gas odor from escaping the package. If the odor of gas can still be smelled from outside the package, then apply perfume, cologne or Febreze® on the carburetor to disguise the smell of gas. Because the US Postal Service or other delivery services will not deliver any packages that smell like gas.
  • Brand New Unaltered and Fully Adjustable Kohler #26 carburetor for K241/M10 (10hp) and K301/M12 (12hp) Kohler and Magnum engines. NOTE: Has choke lever for the round air filter housing assembly, but can be converted for the oblong air filter housing assembly (Quiet Line).
    • Aftermarket. Our part # 61069. $130.00 each outright, plus shipping & handling.
    • OEM Kohler part # A-236271-S. $281.80 each outright, plus shipping & handling.
  • New Walbro WHG #52 carburetor (pictured below Ê) with adjustable high speed main jet. Comes with throttle linkage, mounting and air filter housing gaskets. NOTE: Has choke lever for the round air filter housing assembly. Kohler part #'s 47 853 22-S, 47 853 23-S.
    • Aftermarket. $160.00 each outright, plus shipping & handling.
    • OEM Walbro/Kohler part. $212.10 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • New Walbro WHG #52 carburetor (pictured below Ê) with adjustable high speed main jet. Comes with throttle linkage, mounting and air filter housing gaskets. NOTE: Has choke lever for the oblong air filter housing assembly (Quiet Line). Kohler part # 47 853 20-S.
    • Aftermarket. $230.00 each outright, plus shipping & handling.
    • OEM Walbro/Kohler part. $299.70 each, plus shipping & handling.

Carburetors for Kohler K-series and Magnum engine models K321/M14 and (14hp), K341/M16 (16hp) and K361 (18hp OHV). These are plain, stock carburetors that's been completely disassembled, thoroughly cleaned and rebuilt. All fuel passageways cleared, new parts and if necessary, a bushing and/or new throttle shaft installed. No performance modifications made to these carburetors whatsoever. Comes with choke plate installed. For gas or E85. Please indicate if for a Kohler "Quiet Line" engine with the oblong-shaped air filter housing housing, or for an engine with the round air filter housing housing. (The choke lever and air filter housing mounting holes are different.) No performance modifications are made to these carburetors whatsoever. All rebuilt carburetors that we service and sell come with a 30 day workmanship warranty and are guaranteed to be free of defects. The idle speed and air/fuel mixture adjustments will be preset on the carburetor to get the engine running, but due to your altitude, you will need to make the final adjustments so the engine will run smooth. Kohler carburetor part #'s 45 053 08, 45 053 09, 45 053 12, 45 053 20, 45 053 26, 45 053 68, 45 053 70, 45 053 76, 45 053 77, 47 053 03, 47 053 09, 47 053 15, 47 053 16, 47 053 17, 47 053 20, 47 053 30, 47 053 35, 47 053 41, 47 053 63 or 47 053 78. NOTE: Not all carburetor numbers are listed with Kohler. No numbers are available from any source for the Carter #26, #28 or #30 carburetors.
  • Rebuilt Kohler #30 carburetor for K321/M14 (14hp) and K341/M16 (16hp) engines outright. OEM Kohler part # 45 053 20-S. $175.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] NOTE: Please don't discard your rebuildable Carter or Kohler carburetor core. These are considered valuable nowadays.
  • Rebuilt Kohler #30 carburetor for K321/M14 (14hp) and K341/M16 (16hp) engines with rebuildable core trade-in. $150.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] IMPORTANT: When sending your carburetor to me, please package it securely so it won't get damaged in shipping and include a note in the package with your name, complete and correct postal address, phone number (in case I have any questions), a description of what you want done, how the engine will be used and any other parts you may need. And be sure to enclose it in a sealed zip-lock sandwich bag to prevent the gas odor from escaping the package. If the odor of gas can still be smelled from outside the package, then apply perfume, cologne or Febreze® on the carburetor to disguise the smell of gas. Because the US Postal Service or other delivery services will not deliver any packages that smell like gas.
  • Brand New Unaltered and Fully Adjustable Kohler #30 carburetors for K321/M14 (14hp) and K341/M16 (16hp) engines. NOTE: Has choke lever for the round air filter housing assembly, but can be converted for the oblong air filter housing assembly (Quiet Line).
    • Aftermarket. Our part # 61068. $130.00 each outright, plus shipping & handling.
    • OEM Kohler part # 45 053 20-S. $198.40 each outright, plus shipping & handling.
  • Rebuilt Kohler #30 carburetor for K361 (18hp OHV) engine outright. OEM Kohler part #'s 45 053 38-S, 45 053 39-S, 45 053 40-S. $200.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] NOTE: Please don't discard your rebuildable Carter or Kohler carburetor core. These are considered valuable nowadays.
  • Rebuilt Kohler #30 carburetor for K361 (18hp OHV) engine with rebuildable core trade-in. $175.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] IMPORTANT: When sending your carburetor to me, please package it securely so it won't get damaged in shipping and include a note in the package with your name, complete and correct postal address, phone number (in case I have any questions), a description of what you want done, how the engine will be used and any other parts you may need. And be sure to enclose it in a sealed zip-lock sandwich bag to prevent the gas odor from escaping the package. If the odor of gas can still be smelled from outside the package, then apply perfume, cologne or Febreze® on the carburetor to disguise the smell of gas. Because the US Postal Service or other delivery services will not deliver any packages that smell like gas.
  • New Walbro WHG #60, #64 carburetor (pictured below Ê) with adjustable high speed main jet. Comes with throttle linkage, mounting and air filter housing gaskets. NOTE: Has choke lever for the round air filter housing assembly. Kohler part #'s 47 853 29-S, 47 853 30-S.
    • Aftermarket. $230.00 each outright, plus shipping & handling.
    • OEM Walbro/Kohler part. $302.20 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • New Walbro WHG #60, #64 carburetors (pictured below Ê) with adjustable high speed main jet. Comes with throttle linkage, mounting and air filter housing gaskets. NOTE: Has choke lever for the oblong air filter housing assembly (Quiet Line). OEM Kohler part # 47 853 35-S. $336.30 each outright, plus shipping & handling.

Carburetors for Kohler KT-series and Magnum models KT17, KT17II, KT19, KT19II, M18, MV18, M20 and MV20 cast iron, flathead twin cylinder engines. These are plain, stock carburetors that's been completely disassembled, thoroughly cleaned and rebuilt. All fuel passageways cleared, new parts and if necessary, a bushing and/or new throttle shaft installed. No performance modifications made to these carburetors whatsoever. Comes with choke plate installed. Set up for gas. No performance modifications are made to these carburetors whatsoever. When ordering, please specify the position of the choke lever. All rebuilt carburetors that we service and sell come with a 30 day workmanship warranty and are guaranteed to be free of defects. The idle speed and air/fuel mixture adjustments will be preset on the carburetor to get the engine running, but due to your altitude, you will need to make the final adjustments so the engine will run smooth. Kohler carburetor part #'s 52 053 09, 52 053 18 or 52 053 28. NOTE: Not all carburetor numbers are listed with Kohler.
  • Rebuilt Kohler #26 carburetor for KT17, KT17II, KT19, KT19II, M18:
    • Outright. $150.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] NOTE: Please don't discard your Carter or Kohler carburetor core. These are no longer made and are considered valuable nowadays. If not rebuildable, maybe the parts can be used on a good core.
    • With rebuildable core trade-in. $125.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.]
  • Rebuilt Kohler #26 carburetor for M20. (New carburetors for model M20 have been discontinued. OEM Kohler part #'s 52 853 27-S, 52 853 27-S.)
    • Outright. $185.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.]
    • With rebuildable core trade-in. $150.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.]
    • IMPORTANT: When sending your carburetor to me, please package it securely so it won't get damaged in shipping and include a note in the package with your name, complete mailing address, phone number (in case I have any questions), a description of what you want done, how the engine will be used and any other parts you may need. And be sure to enclose it in a sealed zip-lock sandwich bag to prevent the gas odor from escaping the package. If the odor of gas can still be smelled from outside the package, then apply perfume, cologne or Febreze® on the carburetor to disguise the smell of gas. Because the US Postal Service or other delivery services will not deliver any packages that smell like gas.
  • New Walbro carburetors (below Ê) with adjustable high speed main jet. Comes with throttle linkage, mounting and air filter housing gaskets. Available for the following engines:
    • Models MV16, MV18. Choke lever positioned upward. OEM Kohler part # 52 853 25-S. $222.40 each outright, plus shipping & handling.
    • Model KT17, KT17II, KT19, KT19II, M18. Choke lever positioned downward. OEM Kohler part # 52 853 23-S. $296.40 each outright, plus shipping & handling.
    • Model KT17, KT17II, KT19, KT19II, M18. Choke lever positioned downward. OEM Kohler part # 52 853 30-S. $296.40 each outright, plus shipping & handling.
    • Model MV20. Choke lever positioned upward. OEM Kohler part # 52 853 29-S. $228.00 each outright, plus shipping & handling.
Unaltered and Fully Adjustable Genuine Original OEM Kohler (not Walbro or aftermarket) carburetors for Kohler engine models K482 (18hp), K532 (20hp) and K582 (23hp). The idle speed and air/fuel mixture adjustments will be preset on the carburetor to get the engine running, but due to your altitude, you will need to make the final adjustments so the engine will run smooth.
  • New #26 (1.07" throttle bore) carburetor for Kohler engine models K482 and K532. OEM Kohler part # 48 053 07-S. $366.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Rebuilt #26 carburetor for models K482 and K532. OEM Kohler part # 48 053 07-S. $180.00 each, plus shipping & handling. (When available.)
  • Rebuilt #30 (1.2" throttle bore) carburetor for Kohler engine model K582. NOTE: There are no other carburetor that will work well on the Kohler K582 engine. The 48 053 06-S carburetor was designed specifically for the K582 engine and if a different carburetor is used, the engine won't produce as much power. OEM Kohler part # 48 053 06-S. (Discontinued. No longer available new from Kohler.) $250.00 each, plus shipping & handling. (When available.)
  • Throttle shaft repair kit for above È carburetors. OEM Kohler part # 25 757 17-S. $56.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • NOTE: If the throttle or choke shaft(s) holes are worn in a K482, K532 or K582 carburetor, the carburetor body can be machined for installation of bronze bushings (for choke shaft) or a fabricated/oversize throttle shaft. I've performed many of these shaft repairs on carburetors with success. If you're interested, I can repair yours as well. For dimension measurements, I will need the complete carburetor with the throttle shaft and throttle plate. The repair price per shaft is $65.00 for parts and labor, plus return shipping & handling.
Rebuilt, reworked and modified only for high-performance use, #26 Carter or Kohler carburetors. The venturi in these carburetors can be bored so they'll have either a 7/8", 1" (.995" NQS legal) venturi or a 1.07" straight-through throttle bore for high rpm operation, setup for gas, E85 or methanol fuels, whatever your club's sanctioning rules allow or whatever you desire for all-out engine performance. These carburetors are completely disassembled, then thoroughly cleaned. All fuel passageways cleared, new parts and a new throttle shaft and/or bushing are installed if necessary. The idle speed and air/fuel mixture adjustments will be preset on the carburetor to get the engine running, but due to your altitude, you will need to make the final adjustments so the engine will run smooth.

NOTE: These carburetors are designed for use on Stock and Stock-Altered pulling engines with a stock size or an oversize intake valve. Also, a high-performance carburetor is designed solely for a high-performance engine. Just bolting on a high-performance carburetor is not how to gain more power and torque for a stock engine. If your engine is not a high-performance engine built to race specs, then it will not benefit from a high-performance carburetor whatsoever. These carburetors will not allow a stock "factory-built engine" to produce lots of power just by bolting it it on. Everything in the engine MUST work together to prevent air restriction or a "bottleneck" to slow down air flow. With a bigger carburetor, the engine needs to breath A LOT more air in and out of the combustion chamber. This means the intake and exhaust ports will need to be made bigger, the valves reworked for more airflow, a bigger cam will need to be installed, and the ignition system will need to be up to standards.

Also, these carburetors are "built to order." So when placing an order, please specify if your engine has a factory stock size or oversize intake valve, if you want it with a straight-thru throttle bore (no venturi) or a 1" (.995" NQS legal) venturi, if the engine is going to turn around 4,000 rpm or at wide open throttle, and if you want the choke plate/shaft installed.

All rebuilt carburetors that we service and sell come with a 30 day workmanship warranty and are guaranteed to be free of defects.

  • Carburetor with top high speed fuel adjuster. (For up to 4,000 rpm operation.)
    • Outright: $200.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] NOTE: Please don't discard your Carter or Kohler carburetor core. These are no longer made and are considered valuable nowadays. If not rebuildable, maybe the parts can be used on a good core.
    • With rebuildable core trade-in: $175.00 with a rebuildable core. IMPORTANT: When sending your carburetor to me, please package it securely so it won't get damaged in shipping and include a note in the package with your name, complete mailing address, phone number (in case I have any questions), a description of what you want done, how the engine will be used and any other parts you may need. And be sure to enclose it in a sealed zip-lock sandwich bag to prevent the gas odor from escaping the package. If the odor of gas can still be smelled from outside the package, then apply perfume, cologne or Febreze® on the carburetor to disguise the smell of gas. Because the US Postal Service or other delivery services will not deliver any packages that smell like gas.
  • Carburetor with bottom high speed fuel adjuster. (For wide open throttle operation.)
    • Outright: $215.00 each outright, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] NOTE: Please don't discard your Carter or Kohler carburetor core. These are no longer made and are considered valuable nowadays. If not rebuildable, maybe the parts can be used on a good core.
    • With rebuildable core trade-in: $190.00 with a rebuildable core. IMPORTANT: When sending your carburetor to me, please package it securely so it won't get damaged in shipping and include a note in the package with your name, complete mailing address, phone number (in case I have any questions), a description of what you want done, how the engine will be used and any other parts you may need. And be sure to enclose it in a sealed zip-lock sandwich bag to prevent the gas odor from escaping the package. If the odor of gas can still be smelled from outside the package, then apply perfume, cologne or Febreze® on the carburetor to disguise the smell of gas. Because the US Postal Service or other delivery services will not deliver any packages that smell like gas.
Rebuilt, reworked and modified only for high-performance use, #30 Carter or Kohler carburetors. The venturi in these carburetors can be bored so they'll have a 1.2" straight-through throttle bore, setup for gas, E85 or methanol fuels, whatever your club's sanctioning rules allow or whatever you desire for all-out engine performance. These carburetors are completely disassembled, then thoroughly cleaned. All fuel passageways cleared, new parts and a new throttle shaft and/or bushing are installed if necessary. The idle speed and air/fuel mixture adjustments will be preset on the carburetor to get the engine running, but due to your altitude, you will need to make the final adjustments so the engine will run smooth.

NOTE: These carburetors are designed for use on Stock and Stock-Altered pulling engines with a stock size or an oversize intake valve. Also, a high-performance carburetor is designed solely for a high-performance engine. Just bolting on a high-performance carburetor is not how to gain more power and torque for a stock engine. If your engine is not a high-performance engine built to race specs, then it will not benefit from a high-performance carburetor whatsoever. These carburetors will not allow a stock "factory-built engine" to produce lots of power just by bolting it it on. Everything in the engine MUST work together to prevent air restriction or a "bottleneck" to slow down air flow. With a bigger carburetor, the engine needs to breath A LOT more air in and out of the combustion chamber. This means the intake and exhaust ports will need to be made bigger, the valves reworked for more airflow, a bigger cam will need to be installed, and the ignition system will need to be up to standards.

Also, these carburetors are "built to order." So when placing an order, please specify if your engine has a factory stock size or oversize intake valve, if you want it with a straight-thru throttle bore (no venturi) or a 1" (.995" NQS legal) venturi, if the engine is going to turn around 4,000 rpm or at wide open throttle, and if you want the choke plate/shaft installed.

All rebuilt carburetors that we service and sell come with a 30 day workmanship warranty and are guaranteed to be free of defects.

  • Carburetor with top high speed fuel adjuster. (For up to 4,000 rpm operation.)
    • Outright: $250.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] NOTE: Please don't discard your Carter or Kohler carburetor core. These are no longer made and are considered valuable nowadays. If not rebuildable, maybe the parts can be used on a good core.
    • With a rebuildable core trade-in: $225.00 each, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] IMPORTANT: When sending your carburetor to me, please package it securely so it won't get damaged in shipping and include a note in the package with your name, complete mailing address, phone number (in case I have any questions), a description of what you want done, how the engine will be used and any other parts you may need. And be sure to enclose it in a sealed zip-lock sandwich bag to prevent the gas odor from escaping the package. If the odor of gas can still be smelled from outside the package, then apply perfume, cologne or Febreze® on the carburetor to disguise the smell of gas. Because the US Postal Service or other delivery services will not deliver any packages that smell like gas.
  • Carburetor with bottom high speed fuel adjuster. (For wide open throttle operation.)
    • Outright: $265.00 each outright, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] NOTE: Please don't discard your Carter or Kohler carburetor core. These are no longer made and are considered valuable nowadays. If not rebuildable, maybe the parts can be used on a good core.
    • With a rebuildable core trade-in: $240.00 each outright, plus shipping & handling. [When available.] IMPORTANT: When sending your carburetor to me, please package it securely so it won't get damaged in shipping and include a note in the package with your name, complete mailing address, phone number (in case I have any questions), a description of what you want done, how the engine will be used and any other parts you may need. And be sure to enclose it in a sealed zip-lock sandwich bag to prevent the gas odor from escaping the package. If the odor of gas can still be smelled from outside the package, then apply perfume, cologne or Febreze® on the carburetor to disguise the smell of gas. Because the US Postal Service or other delivery services will not deliver any packages that smell like gas.


How To Convert a Carter or Kohler Carburetor For high-performance Use At Any Engine Rpm -

By boring out the venturi (the smallest part of a throttle bore) and reworking the Carter or Kohler carburetor, this will "open up the carburetor" and allow the engine to draw more air into the combustion chamber so it can build up more compression, which will allow it to produce more power. (It'll be like going from a 2-barrel carburetor to a 4-barrel on a V8 automotive engine.) The below Ê have been proven to work very well, and it equals the performance of the popular and high-performance "Super Carb" carburetor.

  1. Completely disassemble carburetor, including removal of the throttle shaft/plate and main jet/nozzle, except for removal of the choke shaft/plate if it's required in the rules to be intact, and soak the carburetor body and metal parts overnight in Berryman® Chem-Dip® Carburetor and Parts Cleaner (available at most auto parts supply stores) to dissolve or loosen any dried gas deposits, crud and debris.
  2. Resurface the choke flange on a flat sanding disc or belt sander to remove any gasket material and insure proper alignment when boring the throttle bore, and resurface the mounting flange to prevent a vacuum leak. (I use the side of the cutting wheel on my 14" chop saw. Works great! Be sure to use eye protection!)
  3. Clamp the carburetor body securely on the table of a milling machine and center the throttle bore with the spindle with use of a centering indicator. Clamp down the table. If intact, be sure the choke plate is in the closed position!
  4. Use a reamer or large drill bit of a specific diameter to bore the venturi. Enlarge the venturi to either a 1" limit (.995" NQS legal size), make it a straight-through design (to match the diameter of the throttle bore) or enlarge it to whatever your club's sanctioning rules allow. Turn the cutting tool at a slow speed, and apply a continuous spray of WD-40 while boring the venturi to create a smooth, slick surface in the throttle bore.
  5. Soak the carburetor body and all related parts (except rubber-like parts) in carburetor cleaner overnight. Then clean the carburetor with solvent (paint thinner) and use [150± psi] compressed air to thoroughly clear out all fuel and air passageways.
  6. Grind an angle on the main nozzle. To do this correctly so the engine will accelerate without hesitation...
    1. Reinstall the main jet/nozzle in the carburetor body and tighten it down.
    2. Use a felt tip marker (Sharpie) to locate where to grind the angle on the end of the main jet/nozzle:
      • For an engine with stock size valves, go through the throttle plate end and place a mark on the exposed tip of the nozzle.
      • For an engine with oversize valves (larger than stock), go through the choke end and place a mark on the exposed tip of the nozzle.
      • The mark will be reference where to grind the angle. See animated photo below Ê.
  7. Remove the nozzle, then carefully grind a 60° angle where the mark was made. When grinding the 60° angle, carefully grind 3/4 from the tip, but leave 1/4 of the end flat. Be careful not to shorten the nozzle when grinding the angle, and make sure the angle is centered with the mark. If the tip is too short or not centered, the engine may hesitate upon acceleration. See drawing to the right. ä
  8. After grinding the angle, use a deburring tool or drill bit (that fits the hole) to remove the burr from inside the nozzle. Then use [150± psi] compressed air to clear out any metal fragments from inside the nozzle.
  9. Reinstall the nozzle in the carburetor and check that the angle is in exact alignment with the throttle bore.
  10. Due to normal engine vibrations at high rpms, plug the original atmospheric vent hole(s) and then drill a 3/32" hole on the side of the carburetor body in alignment with the atmospheric vent hole passageway in case of gas overflow and/or so the engine won't possibly run erratically rich on fuel. Or for safety and convenience, leave out the choke shaft and plate, plug the choke shaft holes, and install a remote fuel primer kit as described further down in this web site. Ê
  11. With a bored-out venturi, the engine will obviously draw more air and require more fuel. To prevent the engine from starving for fuel at high rpms, offset the level of the float upward. To adjust it correctly, with the carburetor body turned upside-down, set the float so it will be downward. This will permit the float to drop down more as fuel level decreases, allowing the float valve to open further so more fuel will enter the float bowl. See the drawing to the right. à
  12. Idle Fuel Passageway: For around 4,000 rpm operation, enlarge the lower hole in the high speed main fuel needle adjuster to .046" so the engine will idle better. If the engine is going to run at higher rpms or at wide open throttle, convert the carburetor for use with the bottom main fuel adjuster as described further down in this web site Ê. Make sure the idle fuel passageways are clear of debris, too.
  13. On the throttle shaft, grind the area opposite the throttle plate until the shaft is about 1/16" thickness so more air can pass around the shaft at high rpms, but leave the screw holes "lumped up" to prevent stripping the threads and to maintain strength in the shaft. See photo to the right. à
  14. Reassemble the carburetor using a new overhaul kit and install a bronze throttle shaft bushing if it needs one and that's it! FYI - Bearing bronze is very hard, porous, absorbs oil and lasts a long time when lubricated regularly and used as a bushing. Brass, on the other hand, is soft, non-porous and wears quickly when used as a load-bearing bushing.


How to Convert the Carter or Kohler #26, #28 or #30 Carburetor to the Bottom Main Fuel Adjuster -

Due to normal engine vibrations well above 4,000 rpm, or at wide open throttle, the pointed tip of the OEM high speed needle adjuster will "vibrate around" in the lower hole of the main jet/nozzle. Due to normal engine vibrations at wide open throttle, the tip of the adjuster will wear the hole larger, causing the engine to eventually run rich on fuel, which will make further lean adjustments impossible. This will happen with gas or alcohol fuels. There is no way to prevent this except convert the carburetor to the bottom main fuel adjuster. This has been proven to work flawlessly for high-rpm competitive pulling. And when the carburetor is reworked with the venturi bored out (straight-through throttle bore design) for high-performance use, it equals the performance of the popular "Super Carb" carburetor. (Which I think is a very fine performance carburetor.)

And if you're wondering if the presence of the OEM high speed needle adjuster tube will slow the airflow through the "straight through" throttle bore, well, the throttle plate and shaft are about 30% wider even with the throttle shaft ground or machined thin to increase the air flow.

FYI - The only purpose for this is to prevent the bottom hole in the main jet/nozzle from eventually becoming enlarged at high rpms. Otherwise, there is no performance gain from doing this whatsoever.

Here's how to convert the carburetor to a bottom fuel adjuster:

  1. Break off the OEM high speed needle adjuster at the lower hole with pliers. Bevel the end of the tube so fuel can flow smoothly past it at high rpms. Make sure inside of the tube is open and not clogged so the engine will idle.
  2. Remove the compression pressure spring from the high speed adjuster and install a spacer or a stack of flat washers that's approximately 1/4" thick. The 1/4" spacing positions the end of the high speed adjuster tube about 3/16" above the main jet hole.
  3. Reinstall the high speed adjuster in the carburetor body and tighten it down, making it non-adjustable.
  4. Install the bottom main fuel adjuster to adjust the fuel mixture at high rpm, and that's it!
  5. Absolutely nothing needs to be done to the idle fuel circuit or idle adjusting screw. Just leave them alone and make normal air/fuel adjustment until the engine idles smoothly.


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If you need any of the items listed below Ê, please contact A-1 Miller's Performance Enterprises | 1501 W. Old Plank Rd. | Columbia, MO 65203-9136 USA | Phone: 1-573-875-4033. Please call Monday-Friday (except Holidays), 9am to 5pm, Central time zone. If no answer, please try again later. (When speaking with Brian, please be patient because I stutter.) Fax: 1-573-449-7347. E-mail: pullingtractor@aol.com. You can also contact us through Yahoo! Messenger: Find us here: Directions to our shop | Yahoo! Maps, 1501 W. Old Plank Rd., Columbia, MO | 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO - Google Maps or Map of 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO by MapQuest. Go here for more parts: Carburetor, Fuel System Parts & Machine Shop Services | NOTE: To place an order, please call or send an email with a list and description of the parts or services you need. Because as of right now, we're not set up to accept orders through our web sites online.
NOTE: All parts listed here are NEW, unless otherwise stated. I do not sell cheap junk! As a matter of fact, most OEM Kohler parts are made in China now. Kohler owns some of the factories in China that make the parts. And most aftermarket parts are also made by Kohler in China. Kohler just place the part(s) in a generic box and sell them for less money. So when purchasing a genuine OEM Kohler part that comes in a box with the Kohler name on it, you're really just paying more money for the name.
Carburetor Mounting Gasket for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Walbro WHL #36, #44 carburetors used on K90 (3.6hp), K91 (4hp), K141 (6¼hp), K160 (6.6hp), K161 (7hp) and K181/M8 (8hp) Kohler K-series and Magnum flathead cast iron block engines. Approximately 1/32" thickness. Kohler part # 210223-S.
  • Aftermarket. Our part # 3556. $1.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $2.75 each, plus shipping & handling.
Air Filter Housing or Intake Elbow Adapter Mounting Gasket for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Walbro WHL #36, #44 carburetors used on K90 (3.6hp), K91 (4hp), K141 (6¼hp), K160 (6.6hp), K161 (7hp) and K181 (8hp) Kohler K-series flathead cast iron block engines, and most aluminum block Tecumseh engines. Approximately 1/32" thickness. Use with two mounting screws. (This is a Tecumseh part that happens to fit the Carter and Walbro WHL carburetors perfectly.) Replaces Kohler part # 220537. (Discontinued from Kohler.) OEM Tecumseh part # 27272A.
  • Genuine Tecumseh part only. $1.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
Alternate Air Filter Housing or Intake Elbow Adapter Mounting Gasket for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Walbro WHL 36, #44 carburetors used on K90 (3.6hp), K91 (4hp), K141 (6¼hp), K160 (6.6hp), K161 (7hp) and K181/M8 (8hp) Kohler K-series and Magnum flathead cast iron block engines. Use with two or three mounting screws. Approximately 1/32" thickness. Kohler part # 41 041 11-S.
  • Aftermarket. Our part # 7795. $1.10 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $1.65 each, plus shipping & handling.
Carburetor Mounting Gasket for Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 and Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors used on Kohler K-series and Magnum models K241 (10hp), K301 (12hp), K321 (14hp), K330/K331 (12½hp), K341 (16hp) flatheads, K361 (18hp OHV) and twin cylinder cast iron block engines. Approximately 1/32" thickness. For general yard work. Kohler part # 271030-S.
  • Aftermarket. $1.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $3.55 each, plus shipping & handling.
Heat Isolator Carburetor Mounting Gasket for Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 and Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors used on Kohler K-series and Magnum models K241 (10hp), K301 (12hp), K321 (14hp), K330/K331 (12½hp), K341 (16hp) flatheads, K361 (18hp OHV) and twin cylinder cast iron block engines. 3/16" thickness. Kohler part # 47 049 01-S. NOTE: This particular gasket prevents engine heat from being transferred to the carburetor. Therefore, the fuel atomizes better to improve engine performance. Ideal for heavy yard/garden work and/or competitive pulling when rules require that carburetor cannot be installed with any kind of extension.
  • Aftermarket. $10.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $11.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
Air Cleaner Base Mounting Gasket for Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 and Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors used on Kohler K-series and Magnum models K241 (10hp), K301 (12hp), K321 (14hp), K330/K331 (12½hp), K341 (16hp) flatheads, K361 (18hp OHV) and twin cylinder cast iron block engines with the round air filter housing assembly. Use with three mounting screws. Approximately 1/32" thickness. Kohler part # 275341-S.
  • Aftermarket. $1.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $3.10 each, plus shipping & handling.
Air Cleaner Base Mounting Gasket for Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 and Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors used on Kohler (Quiet Line) K-series and Magnum engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 flatheads, K361 (18hp OHV) with the oblong air filter housing assembly. Use with three mounting screws. Approximately 1/32" thickness.
  • OEM Kohler part # 45 041 07-S. $3.30 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part # 52 041 12-S. $3.20 each, plus shipping & handling.
Intake Manifold-to-Cylinder Mounting Gasket for Kohler flathead twin cylinder engine models KT17, KT17II, KT19, KT19II, KT21, MV16, M18, MV18, M20 and MV20. Approximately 1/32" thickness. Kohler part # 52 041 09-S.
  • Aftermarket. $1.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $5.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
Exhaust manifold-to-cylinder mounting gasket for Kohler flathead twin cylinder engine models KT17, KT17II, KT19, KT19II, KT21, MV16, M18, MV18, M20 and MV20. Kohler part # 52 041 14-S.
  • Aftermarket. $4.40 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $5.45 each, plus shipping & handling.
Intake manifold-to-block mounting gasket for Kohler flathead twin cylinder engine models K482, K532 and K582. OEM Kohler part # 48 052 02-S.
  • $3.70 each, plus shipping & handling.
Exhaust manifold-to-block mounting gasket for Kohler flathead twin cylinder engine models K482, K532 and K582. OEM Kohler part # 25 041 11-S.
  • $6.80 each, plus shipping & handling.
Air intake elbow adapter to carburetor mounting gasket for Kohler flathead twin cylinder engine models KT17, KT17II, KT19, KT19II, KT21, MV16, M18, MV18, M20 and MV20 and certain K321 and K341 engines. Approximately 1/32" thickness. OEM Kohler part # 25 041 06-S.
  • OEM Kohler part only. $1.70 each, plus shipping & handling.
Carburetor Overhaul Kit for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors used on Kohler K-series and early Magnum single and twin cylinder flathead cast iron block engines. Includes Viton-tip fuel inlet float valve and brass seat, bowl O-ring seal, fuel baffle splash shield (goes between O-ring and float bowl) bottom fiber washer and float hinge pin. All parts made of alcohol-resistant neoprene rubber. OEM Kohler part # 25 757 02-S.
  • $13.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
Carburetor Overhaul Kit with Viton-tip fuel inlet float valve for Walbro WHL #36, #44 or WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors that's used on Kohler Magnum models M8 (8hp), M10 (10hp), M12 (12hp), M14 (14hp), M16 (16hp), MV16, M18, MV18, M20 and MV20 single- and twin-cylinder flathead cast iron block engines. Includes carburetor mounting gasket.
  • OEM Walbro part # K1-WHG. $9.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 25 757 11-S. (Made by Walbro.) $38.85 each, plus shipping & handling.
Viton-tip fuel inlet float valve and brass seat for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors. Not available separately from Kohler. Replaces Kohler part # 25 757 01-S.
  • $9.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
Viton-tip fuel inlet float valve for Walbro WHL #36, #44 or WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors. Not available separately from Kohler. OEM Walbro part # 82-529-7.
  • $6.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
Solid Brass Fuel Inlet Float Needle Valve for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors. These last longer with methanol fuel because they don't wear as much as the Viton-tip needles. Use with the OEM Kohler 3/8" hex brass seat. Use a small hammer to lightly tap the needle into the seat to form a sealing surface. Originally made by Carter, but discontinued from Kohler many years ago.
  • $10.00 each, plus shipping & handling. (When available.)
Float Bowl O-Ring Seal. 2-3/8" diameter. Fits Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors used on the Kohler K-series and early Magnum single cylinder 4hp-16hp, 18hp OHV single- and twin-cylinder flathead cast iron block engines. Also fits Tecumseh engines with Carter or Walbro carburetors (large bowl). Made of alcohol resistant neoprene rubber. Included in overhaul kit above È. Kohler part # 200375-S.
  • Aftermarket. $1.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $4.25 each, plus shipping & handling.

Float Bowl O-Ring Seal. 2-7/16" diameter. Fits Walbro WHL #36, #44 or WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors that's used on Kohler Magnum engine models M8 (8hp), M10 (10hp), M12 (12hp), M14 (14hp), M16 (16hp), MV16, M18, MV18, M20 and MV20 single- and twin-cylinder flathead cast iron block engines. Made of alcohol resistant neoprene rubber.

  • OEM Walbro part # 92-301-8. $1.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 25 041 04-S. (Made by Walbro.) $5.15 each, plus shipping & handling.
Fuel Baffle Splash Shield. Fits all Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors used on the Kohler K-series and early Magnum single cylinder 4hp-16hp, 18hp OHV single- and twin-cylinder flathead cast iron block engines. Goes between bowl seal and float bowl; prevents splashing fuel from entering into throttle bore through the atmospheric vent hole. Made of alcohol resistant neoprene rubber. Included in overhaul kit above È. Kohler part # 25 041 02-S.
  • Aftermarket or $3.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $4.15 each, plus shipping & handling.
Float bowls for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors used on Kohler K-series and early Magnum engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K330/K331 (12½hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 (16hp), K361 (18hp OHV) and twin cylinder cast iron block flathead engines. Either bowl also fits Briggs and Stratton 7hp-12hp vertical shaft engine carburetors. Steel bowl: Briggs and Stratton part # 221995. Aluminum bowl: Kohler part # 235448-S. NOTE: The dimensions of the B&S float bowl matches the Kohler float bowl perfectly (2-5/16" o.d. x 1-1/4" height w/3/8" bottom hole). The steel float bowl is better quality than the aluminum bowl because it won't dent or corrode through. And the float bowl for the Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors will also fit the Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 carburetors. The smaller 5/16" retaining bolt and washer will seal well enough around the 3/8" hole so it won't leak fuel.
  • Aftermarket [steel] bowl. $4.20 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Briggs and Stratton [steel] bowl. $7.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Aftermarket [aluminum] bowl. $11.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler [aluminum] bowl. $12.90 each, plus shipping & handling.

Float bowls for Walbro WHL #36, #44 and WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors used on newer Kohler Magnum M8-M16 cast iron block single-cylinders and MV16, M18, MV18, M20 and MV20 twin-cylinder flathead cast iron cylinders engines. 2½" outside diameter. Each made of dent-proof and anodized, corrosion-resistant steel.

  • OEM Walbro part # 20-180-1. $3.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 25 104 01-S. (Made by Walbro.) $14.90 each, plus shipping & handling.
Brass Floats for all Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors used on the Kohler K-series, early Magnum single cylinder 4hp-16hp, 18hp OHV single- and twin-cylinder flathead cast iron block engines. Dimensions: 15/16" i.d. x 1-15/16" o.d. x 5/8" tall. Kohler part # 25 757 03-S. NOTE: ALL brass floats need to be adjusted when installed. They don't come preset. To set the float level, with the carburetor turned upside down, set the float parallel with the carburetor body. To adjust the float level, use a small flat screwdriver to gently bend the tang that contacts the float valve. Then make sure that the float moves up and down freely without binding.
  • Aftermarket. $6.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $15.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
Plastic Floats for Walbro WHL #36, #44 or WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors used on the Kohler's newer Magnum M8-M16 single- and M18, M20 twin-cylinder cast iron block flathead engines.
  • OEM Walbro part # 75-566-1. $5.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 25 757 09-S. (Made by Walbro.) $17.40 each, plus shipping & handling.
Float Stabilizer Spring for Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors for pulling engines that run well above 4,000 rpms or at wide open throttle. Lessens chance of float bouncing due to normal single cylinder engine vibration at high rpms, which could cause momentary fuel flooding, starvation and/or fuel spillage out of atmospheric vent hole. Not required for general yard use or pulling engines that operate around 4,000 rpms. OEM Kohler part # 237917-S.
  • Used. $4.50 each, plus shipping & handling. (When available.)
  • New. $9.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
Float Pins for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30, Briggs & Stratton, Lawn Boy and Tecumseh carburetors. Dimensions: .090" diameter x .881" length.
  • Briggs & Stratton part #'s 230896, 231435, 691775, Lawn Boy part # 300096; Tecumseh part # 27106. $1.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part # 200376-S. $3.10 each, plus shipping & handling.

Float Pins for Walbro WHL #36, #44 and WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors. Dimensions: .090" diameter x 1.125" length.

  • OEM Walbro part # 78-41-7. $1.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
Float Bowl Retaining Bolt. 5/16" diameter threads x 1/2" head. Fits Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 carburetors. Comes with sealing fiber washer.
  • Kohler part # 41 100 01-S. $7.00 each, plus shipping & handling.

Float Bowl Retaining Bolts. 3/8" diameter threads. Fits Walbro WHL #36, #44 and WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors, and Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors.

  • 1/2" head. OEM Walbro part # 96-340-7. $2.20 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • 1/2" head. Kohler part # 12 086 05-S. (Made by Walbro.) $2.30 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • 9/16" head. OEM Kohler part # 47 100 06-S. $4.90 each, plus shipping & handling.
High Speed Bottom Main Fuel Adjuster. A must for competitive pulling, high rpms or wide open throttle engine operation. Fits all Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors used on the Kohler K-series and early Magnum single cylinder 10hp-16hp, 18hp OHV single-cylinder cast iron block flathead engines. NOTE: Carburetor must be converted to bottom adjuster when using this part.
  • $14.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
5/16" Inside Diameter Float Bowl Retaining Bolt Fiber Sealing Washer for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22, Briggs & Stratton, Mikuni, Tecumseh and other carburetors.
  • Replaces Tecumseh part # 632673, 640042. $1.00 each, plus shipping & handling.

3/8" Inside Diameter Float Bowl Retaining Bolt Fiber Sealing Washer for Walbro WHL #36, #44, and WHG #52, #60, #64 and Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors.

  • OEM Walbro part # 92-300-8. .45¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part # 200372-S. (Made by Walbro.) $1.65 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part # 25 041 03-S. (Made by Walbro.) $3.90 each, plus shipping & handling.
Coming Soon! A-1 Miller's own CNC-machined Brass Main Jet/Nozzles. Projected price: $8.00 each, plus shipping & handing.

New Brass Main Jet/Nozzle. Fits all Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors used on Kohler K-series and early Magnum engine models K241 (10hp), K301 (12hp), K321 (14hp), K330/K331 (12½hp), K341 (16hp) flatheads, K361 (18hp OHV) and twin cylinder cast iron block engines. Drilled for gas. This part is professionally CNC machined in the USA and not available from Kohler. NOTE: When rebuilding a plain, stock Carter or Kohler carburetor, there is no need to remove the main jet/nozzle. If it won't come out, then don't worry about it. All that has to be done to make sure the bottom hole and the side holes on it are open. To check if the side holes are open, simply spray carburetor cleaner or WD-40 or carburetor cleaner (in an aerosol spray can) through the small hole just under the choke plate and observe if the spray exits out the main jet/nozzle inside the throttle bore and bottom of carburetor. But if modifying a carburetor to bore the venturi, the main jet/nozzle must be removed. Click here for how to remove the main jet/nozzle.

  • $15.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
Fixed High Speed Main Jets for Walbro WHL #36, #44 and WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors. 10-32 NF threads. NOTE: Need numbers off of carburetor to match correct size hole in main jet for engine the carburetor is installed on.

Available Jet Sizes and Prices:

  • .045" hole: Kohler part # 47 337 02-S. $6.85 each.
  • .046" hole: Walbro part # 114-0460-1. $5.90 each; Kohler part # 52 337 08-S. $6.75 each.
  • .047" hole: Kohler part# 52 337 01-S. $7.40 each.
  • .048" hole. Kohler part # 52 337 07-S. $6.70 each.
  • .050" hole: Walbro part # 114-0500-1. $6.00 each; Kohler part # 52 337 03-S. $7.30 each.
  • .051" hole: Kohler part # 45 337 01-S. $8.25 each.
  • .052" hole: Walbro part # 114-0520-1. $6.80 each; Kohler part # 52 337 04. $8.65 each.
  • .055" hole: Kohler part # 52 337 06-S. $6.75 each.
High Speed Main Fuel Mixture Adjuster Needle Valves for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 Carburetors - NOTE: Certain high speed main adjusters are designed for a particular carburetor. I list the part number of the carburetor to match the type of adjuster it requires. Kohler don't give their dealers much information on this. I did some research, and I have several used carburetors in stock, and compared the type of adjuster to the part numbers on the carburetor and found that some are in fact different. Therefore, if a wrong high speed needle adjuster is used in a particular carburetor, the engine may not idle correctly, idle too rich, or might not idle at all. Also, if the tip of your high speed needle adjuster is slightly bent, it can be easily straightened with pliers and reused, and will not effect engine performance whatsoever. But if it's damaged from being overtightened, it will need to be replaced. And if the tip is not exactly centered with the hole in the main jet/nozzle, this will also not effect engine performance whatsoever.

For Carter #16 and #20 carburetors used on Kohler single cylinder cast iron block flathead engine models K90 (3.6hp), K91 (4hp), K141 (6¼hp), K160 (6.6hp) and K161 (7hp). Designed specifically for Carter carburetors with following numbers stamped on top of carburetor body: A-230798, A-231966, B-231231, B-231450, B-231469, C-231738, E-231480, E-231488, E-231489, F-230350, F-230502, G-220517, G-230500, 231287, 24588, 41 053 06, 41 053 13, 41 053 14. Important - Please present numbers on carburetor when ordering.

  • OEM Kohler part # 200410-S. $18.35 each, plus shipping & handling.

For Carter #22 carburetor used on Kohler single cylinder cast iron block flathead engine models K181/M8 (8hp). Designed specifically for Carter carburetors with following numbers stamped on top of carburetor body: A-231741, A-234641, C-231738, B-231739, 41 053 01, 41 053 04, 41 053 05, 41 053 06, 41 053 18, 41 053 20. Important - Please present numbers on carburetor when ordering.

  • OEM Kohler part # 232635-S. $26.55 each, plus shipping & handling.


High Speed Main Fuel Mixture Adjuster Needle Valves for Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 Carburetors - NOTE: Certain high speed main adjusters are designed for a particular carburetor. I list the part number of the carburetor to match the type of adjuster it requires. Kohler don't give their dealers much information on this. I did some research, and I have several used carburetors in stock, and compared the type of adjuster to the part numbers on the carburetor and found that some are in fact different. Therefore, if a wrong high speed needle adjuster is used in a particular carburetor, the engine may idle poorly, idle too rich, or not idle at all. Also, if the tip of your high speed needle adjuster is slightly bent, it can be easily straightened with pliers and reused, and will not effect engine performance whatsoever. But if it's damaged from being overtightened, it will need to be replaced. And if the tip is not exactly centered with the hole in the main jet/nozzle, this will also not effect engine performance whatsoever.

For certain Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors used on Kohler K-series and early Magnum flathead engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K330/K331 (12½hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K532 (20hp) and K582 (23hp). Has four holes midway and two lower holes. Designed specifically for Kohler carburetors with following numbers stamped on mounting flange: 47 053 07, 47 053 08, 47 053 12, 47 053 13, 47 053 14, 47 053 24, 47 053 29, 47 053 35, 47 053 40, 47 053 62, 47 053 80, 48 053 06 (K582). Important - Please present numbers on carburetor when ordering. Refer to Kohler Engines Parts Lookup (requires Microsoft Internet Explorer) if in doubt about superseded numbers on carburetor. (Mark "I accept", scroll down, click on "Enter as Guest" and then enter part number in upper right corner.) No numbers are available from any source for the Carter #26, #28 or #30 carburetors.

  • Aftermarket. (Same part below Ê, just different part numbers and prices.) $18.70 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part # 235415-S. $28.30 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part # 48 103 01-S (K582). $20.60 each, plus shipping & handling.

For certain Carter or Kohler #28, #30 carburetors used on Kohler K-series and early Magnum single cylinder engine models K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 (16hp) and K361 (18hp OHV). Has no holes midway and one lower hole. Designed specifically for Kohler carburetors with following numbers stamped on mounting flange: 4174S (Carter), 45 053 08, 45 053 12, 45 053 26, 45 053 68, 45 053 70, 45 053 76, 45 053 77 and 47 053 11. Important - Please present numbers on carburetor when ordering. Refer to Kohler Engines Parts Lookup (requires Microsoft Internet Explorer) if in doubt about superseded numbers on carburetor. (Mark "I accept", scroll down, click on "Enter as Guest" and then enter part number in upper right corner.) No numbers are available from any source for the Carter #26, #28 or #30 carburetors.

  • Kohler part # 45 103 01-S. Available in aftermarket only. $15.70 each, plus shipping & handling.

For certain Carter or Kohler #30, 1.2" throttle bore carburetors used on Kohler K-series and early Magnum single cylinder engine models K482, K532 and K582. Has two holes midway and one lower hole. Designed specifically for Kohler carburetors with following numbers stamped on mounting flange: 47 053 03, 47 053 09, 47 053 15, 47 053 16, 47 053 17, 47 053 20, 47 053 30, 47 053 41, 47 053 63 and 47 053 78. Important - Please present numbers on carburetor when ordering. Refer to Kohler Engines Parts Lookup (requires Microsoft Internet Explorer) if in doubt about superseded numbers on carburetor. (Mark "I accept", scroll down, click on "Enter as Guest" and then enter part number in upper right corner.) No numbers are available from any source for the Carter #26, #28 or #30 carburetors.

  • OEM Kohler part # 47 103 01-S. $17.70 each, plus shipping & handling.

For Kohler #26, 1.07" throttle bore carburetor used on Kohler twin cylinder engine models KT17, KT17II, KT19, KT19II, KT21, MV16, M18, MV18, M20 and MV20. Has two holes midway and two lower holes. Designed specifically for Kohler carburetors with following numbers stamped on mounting flange: 52 053 01, 52 053 02, 52 053 09, 52 053 10, 52 053 11, 52 053 16, 52 053 18 and 52 053 28. Important - Please present numbers on carburetor when ordering. Refer to Kohler Engines Parts Lookup (requires Microsoft Internet Explorer) if in doubt about superseded numbers on carburetor. (Mark "I accept", scroll down, click on "Enter as Guest" and then enter part number in upper right corner.)

  • Used and in excellent condition. OEM Kohler part # 52 103 01-S. (Discontinued from Kohler.) $20.00 each, plus shipping & handling. (When available.)


3/64" (.0469") diameter x 1-3/8" long quality high speed steel drill bit. Use to enlarge lower hole on high speed needle adjuster for Carter or Kohler carburetors so engine will start quicker and idle better.

  • $1.60 each, plus shipping & handling. Many other small size drill bits available.


Idle Fuel Mixture Adjuster Screw for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 carburetors used on Kohler engine models K90 (3.6hp), K91 (4hp), K141 (6¼hp), K160 (6.6hp), K161 (7hp) and K181 (8hp). Also for Carter or Kohler #28, #30 carburetors with 1.17" or 1.2" throttle bore used on Kohler engine models K321 (14hp), K341 (16hp) and K361 (18hp OHV). Short step tip. Dimensions: .865" overall length x .200" tip length x 7-40 threads. (Same part below Ê, different numbers and prices.)

  • OEM Kohler part # 200438-S. $11.77 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part # 275231-S. $10.25 each, plus shipping & handling.

Idle Fuel Mixture Adjuster Screw for Carter or Kohler #26 carburetors with 1.07" throttle bore used on Kohler K-series engine models K241 (10hp), K301 (12hp) and K330/K331 (12½hp). Long step tip. Dimensions: .925" overall length x .260" tip length x 7-40 threads.

  • OEM Kohler part # 235006-S. $4.90 each, plus shipping & handling.

Idle Fuel Mixture Adjuster Screw for Kohler carburetors used on Kohler engine models KT17, KT17II, KT19, KT19II, KT21, MV16, M18, MV18, M20, MV20, K482, K532 and K582. Long tapered tip (not stepped). Dimensions: 1.026" overall length x .404" tip length x 7-40 threads.

  • OEM Kohler part # 277210-S. $7.10 each, plus shipping & handling

Idle Fuel Mixture Adjuster Screw for Walbro WHG and WHL carburetors used on Kohler Magnum single cylinder engine models M8, M10, M12, M14 and M16 and twin cylinder engine models MV16, M18, MV18, M20, MV20.

  • Fits Walbro WHL #36, #44 carburetors.
    • OEM Walbro part # 102-434-1. $1.45 each, plus shipping & handling.
    • Kohler part # 25 368 02-S. (Made by Walbro.) $4.40 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Fits Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors.
    • OEM Walbro part # 102-14-1. $2.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
    • Kohler part # 25 368 01-S. (Made by Walbro.) $3.80 each, plus shipping & handling.


Compression Pressure Spring for High Speed Main Fuel Adjuster above È used on Carter and Kohler #26. #28 or #30 carburetors.

  • OEM Kohler part # 200383-S. $3.40 each, plus shipping & handling.

Compression Pressure Spring for Idle Fuel Mixture Adjuster Screws above È used on Carter, Kohler and Walbro WHL or WHG carburetors.

  • OEM Walbro part # 98-14-7. .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 200380-S. (Made by Walbro.) $4.40 each, plus shipping & handling.

Compression Pressure Spring for Idle Speed Adjuster Screw used on Carter, Kohler and Walbro WHL or WHG carburetors.

  • OEM Walbro part # 98-3059-7. .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 232555-S. (Made by Walbro.) $5.70 each, plus shipping & handling.


High Speed Main Fuel Mixture Adjuster Needle Valve. Fits all Walbro WHL #36, #44 or WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors w/adjustable high speed jet originally used on flathead cast iron block Kohler Magnum single cylinder engine models M8-M16 and twin cylinder models MV16, M18, MV18, M20, MV20.

  • OEM Walbro part # 102-457-1. $2.10 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 25 368 03-S. (Made by Walbro.) $4.80 each, plus shipping & handling.

Compression pressure spring for Walbro high speed main fuel adjuster above È.

  • OEM Walbro part # 98-14-7. .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 25 089 02-S. (Made by Walbro.) $2.85 each, plus shipping & handling.
Throttle Shaft Bushings -
A worn throttle shaft is the #1 cause of most engines wearing out prematurely. If a carburetor has a worn throttle shaft, this will create a vacuum leak and the engine will idle poorly, if at all at times. Not to mention the engine will also draw in dirty air, causing wear on the valve faces/seats and piston rings, and engine will burn oil. More than .010" of play is considered too much for throttle shaft wear. Plus, at operating running speeds (3,600 rpm), the extra air will cause the engine to run lean on fuel, which will overheat the combustion chamber and cause the cylinder head to warp (blow a head gasket) and the piston and rings to wear prematurely, eventually resulting in severe engine wear and excessive oil burning. Along with regular maintenance, repair of a worn throttle shaft is required to help an engine last a long time. The most accurate way to check for amount of wear is with a dial indicator. Return To Previous Paragraph
Bronze throttle shaft bushing Bronze Throttle Shaft Bushing for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 carburetor used on Kohler engine models K90 (3.6hp), K91 (4hp), K141 (6¼hp), K160 (6.6hp), K161 (7hp) and K181/M8 (8hp), as well as other makes and models of engines. Professionally made in the USA of precision CNC machined bearing bronze. Dimensions: .213" i.d. x .407" o.d. x 1/8" height. NOTE: Some early Carter carburetors have a smaller diameter throttle shaft, which is .213" (#3 [drill bit]). This bushing is made for the smaller shaft. If a carburetor has the bigger 7/32" (.219") shaft, once installed, the bushing will need to be carefully drilled or reamed larger to 7/32". Also, some newer Carter carburetors do not have the counterbore to accept this bushing. If there's no counterbore, then either a new throttle shaft (see below Ê) will need to be installed, or if the shaft hole is severely worn, it will need to be slightly enlarged to match a fabricated oversized throttle shaft. I offer this service, too. Apply clean motor oil on throttle shaft before installing for smooth throttle action and less wear to shaft, bushing or carburetor body. No Kohler part number.
  • Aftermarket. $6.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Installation Service: Install this throttle shaft bushing in your Carter or Walbro carburetor. $30.00 each for bushing, new screws and labor, plus return shipping & handling. Please contact me if you're interested in this repair service.

Bronze throttle shaft bushing Bronze (Short) Throttle Shaft Bushing for all Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 and early Walbro #52, #60, #64 carburetors used on Kohler K-series and early Magnum engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K330/K331 (12½hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 (16hp), K361 (18hp OHV) and KT17, KT17II, KT19, KT19II, KT21, MV16, M18, MV18, M20, MV20. Professionally made in the USA of compressed sintered bronze. Dimensions: 1/4" i.d. x 7/16" o.d. x 1/8" height. NOTE: Apply clean motor oil on throttle shaft before installing for smooth throttle action and less wear to shaft, bushing or carburetor body. Kohler part # 25 158 02-S.

  • Aftermarket. $5.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $9.10 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Installation Service: Install this throttle shaft bushing in your Carter, Kohler or Walbro carburetor. $30.00 each for bushing, new screws and labor, plus return shipping & handling. Please contact me if you're interested in this repair service.

FYI - Bearing bronze is very hard, porous, absorbs oil and lasts a long time when lubricated regularly and used as a bushing. Brass, on the other hand, is soft, non-porous and wears quickly when used as a load-bearing bushing.

Installation Instructions: If it isn't severely worn, the original throttle shaft can be reused with the above È bushings. The bushing makes contact with the upper unworn 1/8" area on the shaft. To install the bushing, remove the two small brass screws that secures the throttle plate to the shaft, then remove the shaft from the carburetor body. Clean out the counterbore and depending on the size of carburetor, use a 3/16" or 1/4" bolt and small hammer to squarely drive the bushing into the counterbore, and then reinstall the shaft. To prevent breaking off the throttle (or choke) plate screws, grind the flared ends with a Dremel or equivalent small grinder chucked with a chainsaw sharpening stone. Should a screw break off while attempting to remove it, sometimes the shaft can be difficult to remove. In this case, use the Dremel to grind the flared end of the [broken] screw so it is flush with the throttle shaft. Then the shaft can be removed, and the broken screw can be drilled out with either a 5/64", #46 or 2mm drill bit and retap the threads. The OEM screw size is 3-48 NC. Should the threaded hole become enlarged from drilling out the broken screw, then a larger screw (4-40 NC) will need to be installed. In this event, contact me and order the larger screws with split lock washers. Liquid threadlocker is not required. The bronze bushing is easy to install. Just clean out the counterbore and slide the bushing on a short 1/4" bolt (to guide the bushing straight into the hole), place the bolt with the bushing in the hole and use a medium size hammer to drive it in until it bottoms out. Then apply clean motor oil on throttle shaft before installing for smooth throttle action and less wear to shaft, bushing or carburetor body.

Additional Note: Usually a bronze bushing will snug up a worn throttle shaft. The bushing should last a long time, too. If the bushing fits somewhat loose in the counterbore, tap the sides of the counterbore with a hammer to close it up slightly. In other words, make the counterbore slightly egg-shaped. But don't mash the metal in too much. Just a slight tap on either side should do. But the newer Walbro carburetors have no counterbore for the bushing. Therefore, sometimes the throttle shaft hole in the carburetor body will wear, too. When this happens, installing a new shaft won't fix the problem. The hole must be accurately bored and a bronze sleeve bushing will need to be installed with a new shaft, or if the hole is not worn, sometimes the original shaft can be reused. But if the original shaft is worn and a new throttle shaft isn't available for a particular carburetor, then one must be machined from scratch. And if necessary, a slightly oversized shaft can be installed instead of the original diameter shaft. I can do this for $50.00 parts and labor, plus return shipping & handling.

Bronze Sleeve Throttle Shaft Bushing for the newer Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors that have no counterbore for the short throttle shaft bushing. Dimensions: 1/4" i.d. x .313" o.d. x 3/4" long. NOTE: The upper throttle shaft hole must be precision-bored to exactly .3125" (5/16") in perfect alignment with the lower hole for installation of this bushing. Apply clean motor oil on throttle shaft before installing for smooth throttle action and less wear to shaft and bushing. Not to be used in the Kohler-made carburetors for Kohler engine models K482, K532 or K582. Because in order to install the sleeve bushing, there must be enough metal around the worn throttle shaft hole so when boring the hole to 5/16" (for the bushing), and when installing the bushing, the metal won't break out. If the throttle or choke shaft(s) holes are worn in a K482, K532 or K582 carburetor, the carburetor body can be machined for installation of bronze bushings (for choke shaft) or a fabricated/oversize throttle shaft. I've performed many of these shaft repairs on carburetors with success. If you're interested, I can repair yours as well. For dimension measurements, I will need the complete carburetor with the throttle shaft and throttle plate. The repair price per shaft is $65.00 for parts and labor, plus return shipping & handling. Please contact me if you're interested in this repair service.

  • Aftermarket part; not available from Kohler. $5.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Installation Service: Install bronze throttle shaft sleeve bushing in your Walbro carburetor. $40.00 each for bushing, new screws and labor, plus return shipping & handling. Please contact me if you're interested in this repair service.


Polyurethane Foam Dirt/Dust Seals for Throttle Shafts -

Polyurethane Foam Seal for 7/32" diameter throttle shaft in many smaller Briggs & Stratton engines. Also happens to fit Walbro WHL #44 and Carter #20, #22 carburetors on K90/K91, K141, K161, K181/M8 Kohler engines. . NOTE: Foam seal goes under throttle lever against carburetor body, rather carburetor has a bronze bushing or not. Apply clean motor oil to foam before installation to trap dust and dirt.

  • OEM Briggs & Stratton part #'s 271853, 691321, 691326. $4.00 each, plus shipping & handling

Polyurethane Foam Seal for 1/4" diameter throttle shaft in Walbro WHG #60, #64 and Carter or Kohler #26, #28 or #30 carburetors. NOTE: Foam seal goes under throttle lever against carburetor body, rather carburetor has a bronze bushing or not. Apply clean motor oil to foam before installation to trap dust and dirt.

  • OEM Walbro part # 156-18-8. $1.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Walbro part # 156-24-8. $1.00 each, plus shipping & handling.

Coming Soon! A-1 Miller's own CNC-machined steel throttle and choke shafts for all Carter and Kohler carburetors mentioned in my web sites. (Will come without lever; reuse old lever - align and weld to new shaft.) Projected price, any shaft: $10.00 each, plus shipping & handling.

Throttle Shaft with lever attached, screws and lock washers for Walbro WHL #36 and Carter #16, #18 carburetors used on Kohler K-series engine models K90 (3.6hp), K91 (4hp) cast iron block flathead engines. 7/32" diameter shaft. Can be used with OEM Carter throttle plate or the 25 146 05-S (Walbro) throttle plate below Ê. NOTE: Apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth throttle action and less wear to shaft, bushing and/or carburetor body.
  • Kohler part # 46 144 04-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $23.05 each, plus shipping & handling.
Throttle Shaft with lever attached, screws and lock washers for Walbro WHL #44 and Carter #20, #22 carburetors used on Kohler K-series and Magnum engine models K141 (6¼hp), K160 (6.6hp), K161 (7hp) and K181/M8 (8hp) cast iron block flathead engines. 7/32" diameter shaft. Can be used with OEM Carter throttle plate or the 25 146 05-S (Walbro) throttle plate below Ê. NOTE: Apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth throttle action and less wear to shaft, bushing and/or carburetor body.
  • Kohler part # 41 144 18-S. (Made by Walbro.) $14.20 each, plus shipping & handling.
New-Style Throttle Shaft with lever attached, screws and lock washers for Walbro WHG #52 and Carter or Kohler #26 carburetors with a 1.07" throttle bore used on Kohler K-series and Magnum engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp) and K330/K331 (12½hp) cast iron block flathead engines. Because of the 9/16" screw hole spacing, this shaft is best to be used with the 25 146 02-S (Walbro) throttle plate below Ê. NOTE: Apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth throttle action and less wear to shaft, bushing and/or carburetor body.
  • Kohler part # 47 144 35-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $27.70 each, plus shipping & handling.
New-Style Throttle Shaft with lever attached, screws and lock washers for Walbro WHG #60, #64 and Carter or Kohler #26, #28 or #30 carburetors with a 1.07", 1.17" or 1.2" throttle bore used on Kohler K-series and Magnum engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K330/K331 (12½hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 (16hp) and K361 (18hp OHV). Because of the 3/4" screw hole spacing, this shaft is best to be used with 47 146 10-S (Walbro) throttle plate below Ê or OEM Carter/Kohler #26, #28 or #30 throttle plates (11/16" hole spacing) with holes in plate elongated. NOTE: Apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth throttle action and less wear to shaft, bushing and/or carburetor body.
  • Kohler part # 47 144 36-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $20.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
"New Style" Throttle Shaft Conversion/Upgrade Kit for older Carter #26, #28 or #30 carburetors. When the cast aluminum clamp that fastens on the throttle shaft for the throttle lever cracks or breaks, or if the throttle shaft is severely worn, the carburetor can be converted to the new-style throttle shaft and lever. Kit includes new throttle shaft, screw and pressure spring. NOTE: The protruding pin will need to be ground flush with top of carburetor body and a 9/64" or #29 (drill bit size) hole will need to be drilled through carburetor body and 8-32 NC threads cut for installation of the idle speed adjusting screw. And apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth throttle action and less wear to shaft, bushing or carburetor body.
  • $22.00 per kit, plus shipping & handling.
NOTE: If an OEM Kohler throttle lever has a ball/stud pressed on it, and if the same throttle linkage is going to be reused, the ball/stud will need to be transferred to the new lever by grinding away the flared metal underneath and then place a small bead of weld under the ball/stud to secure it in place on the new lever. Or a new ball w/threaded stud that's listed in this web site can be purchased from me. Also, the holes in the OEM Carter or Kohler [steel] throttle plates, which have an 11/16" spacing for the #26, #28, #30 carburetors, will need to be slightly elongated with a Dremel or equivalent small grinder to match the holes in the 47 144 36-S Walbro throttle shaft, which have a 3/4" spacing. And when installing either throttle plates, with the carburetor float area facing downward, install the plate with the stamped numbers or letter(s) facing outward and toward the right of the throttle bore (as shown above È). And use split lock washers with throttle and choke plate screws to prevent screws from loosening and possibly becoming lodged in intake valve or on top of piston, which could cause severe damage. This is why I recommend using them. Liquid threadlocker is not required with lock washers.
Throttle Shaft w/Prominent Raised Lever for Walbro WHG #52 or Kohler #26 carburetors used on Kohler horizontal shaft engine models KT17, KT17II, KT19, KT19II, KT21, M18 and M20. Comes with mounting screws and lock washers for throttle plate. Lever has a 3/16" hole for throttle bushing/linkage.
  • Kohler part # 52 144 22-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $25.25 each, plus shipping & handling.

Throttle Shaft w/Slightly Raised Lever for Walbro WHG #52 or Kohler #26 carburetors used on Kohler vertical shaft engine models MV16, MV18 and MV20. Comes with mounting screws and lock washers for throttle plate. Lever has a 3/16" hole for throttle bushing/linkage.

  • Kohler part # 52 144 25-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $21.55 each, plus shipping & handling.

NOTE: Each to be used with 25 146 02-S (Walbro) throttle plate below Ê. Apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth throttle action and less wear to shaft, bushing and/or carburetor body.

Throttle plates for Walbro WHL #36, #44 and Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 carburetors with .822" diameter throttle bore.
  • OEM Walbro part # 34-222. $14.40 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 25 146 05-S. (Made by Walbro.) $18.00 each, plus shipping & handling.

Throttle plates for Walbro WHG #52 and Carter/Kohler #26 carburetors with 1.07" diameter throttle bore. 9/16" screw hole spacing. To be used with Walbro 47 144 35-S throttle shaft above È.

  • Kohler part # 25 146 02-S. (OEM Walbro part # 34-112; available only from Kohler.) $5.60 each, plus shipping & handling

Throttle plates for Walbro WHG #60, #64 and Carter/Kohler #30 carburetors with 1.2" diameter throttle bore. 3/4" screw hole spacing. To be used with Walbro 47 144 36-S throttle shaft above È or OEM Carter/Kohler #26 or #30 throttle shafts (11/16" hole spacing) with holes in plate elongated.

  • OEM Walbro part # 34-18-1. $7.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 47 146 10-S. (Made by Walbro.) $9.65 each, plus shipping & handling.
Various Small Screws for Kohler Engines -

3-48 NC Stainless Steel Screws w/split lock washers for throttle or choke plate on Carter or Kohler carburetors. (.095" outside thread diameter.) Tensile strength of 120,000 psi. Replaces Kohler part # 234209-S. (Discontinued from Kohler).

  • $1.00 per pair, plus shipping & handling.

4-40 NC Stainless Steel Screws w/split lock washers for throttle or choke plate on Walbro carburetors or as an oversize replacement for Carter or Kohler carburetors when 3-48 threads strip out. (.108" outside thread diameter.) Tensile strength of 120,000 psi. Replaces Walbro part # 96-263-7, Kohler part # 25 086 27-S.

  • $1.00 per pair, plus shipping & handling.

5-44 NF Zinc-Plated Steel Screws w/split lock washers for various throttle and choke shafts that require this size or as an oversize replacement when smaller screw threads strip out. (.118" outside thread diameter.) Tensile strength of 74,000 psi.

  • .50¢ per pair, plus shipping & handling.

Phillips Head, 8-32 NF (5/32" diameter x 3/8" thread length, fine thread) for mounting air filter housing base on Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Walbro WHL #44 carburetors. Size: . Kohler part # 25 086 99-S.

  • Aftermarket. Hardened zinc-plated steel. .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $1.55 each, plus shipping & handling.

Phillips Head, 10-32 NF (3/16" diameter x 3/8" thread length, fine thread) for mounting air filter housing base on Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 and Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors. Size: . Kohler part # X-167-2-S.

  • Aftermarket. Hardened zinc-plated steel. .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $1.55 each, plus shipping & handling.

Allen Head, 10-32 NF (3/16" diameter x 1/2" thread length, fine thread) for mounting velocity stack on Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 or Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors. (For competitive pulling only.)

  • Stainless steel. $8.00 per pair, plus shipping & handling.

Many other small screw sizes available at reasonable prices.

Quality High Speed Steel Taps -
  • 3-48 NC high speed steel taper tap. For repairing OEM threads in Carter or Kohler throttle and choke shafts. $8.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • 4-40 NC high speed steel taper tap. For Walbro and cutting oversize threads in throttle and choke shafts. $8.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • 5-44 NF high speed steel taper tap. For cutting oversize threads in throttle and choke shafts. $6.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • 8-32 NF high speed steel taper tap. For straightening or cutting new threads in Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 or Walbro WHL #36, #44 carburetors for mounting of air cleaner base. $5.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • 10-32 NF high speed steel taper tap. For straightening or cutting new threads in Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 and Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors for mounting of air cleaner base or velocity stack. $8.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Many other small and large size taps available t reasonable prices.

Coming Soon! A-1 Miller's own CNC-machined steel throttle and choke shafts for all Carter and Kohler carburetors mentioned in my web sites. (Will come without lever; reuse old lever - align and weld to new shaft.) Projected price, any shaft: $10.00 each, plus shipping & handling.

Choke shaft w/cable-controlled lever for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Walbro WHL #36, #44 carburetors used on Kohler engine models K90 (3.6hp), K91, K141, K160/K161, K181 and M8. Overall shaft length: 2-1/2". (The 1-7/8" long choke shaft, which was made by Carter, is no longer available.) Comes with screws and split lock washers. NOTE: Apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth choke operation and less wear to shaft and/or carburetor body.
  • Kohler part # 41 090 22-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $18.10 each, plus shipping & handling.
Choke shaft w/hand-operated or cable-controlled angled lever for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Walbro WHL #36, #44 carburetors used on Kohler engine models K90 (3.6hp), K91, K141, K160/K161, K181 and M8. Overall shaft length: 2-1/16". (The 1-7/8" long choke shaft, which was made by Carter, is no longer available.) Comes with screws and split lock washers. NOTE: Apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth choke operation and less wear to shaft and/or carburetor body.
  • Kohler part # 41 090 20-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $18.10 each, plus shipping & handling.
Choke shaft w/cable-controlled, swivel screw clamp lever for Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Walbro WHL #36, #44 carburetors used on Kohler engine models K90 (3.6hp), K91, K141, K160/K161, K181 and M8. Overall shaft length: 2-1/2". (The 1-7/8" long choke shaft, which was made by Carter, is no longer available.) Comes with screws and split lock washers. NOTE: Apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth choke operation and less wear to shaft and/or carburetor body.
  • OEM Walbro part # 40-917-1. $17.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
Choke shaft w/short, cable-controlled lever for Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 and Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors with the round air filter housing assembly. Overall shaft length: 2-5/8". Comes with screws and split lock washers. NOTE: This choke shaft is made by Walbro and designed for Walbro choke plates. Therefore, the holes in the OEM Carter or Kohler choke plate (with K stamped in it) may need to be elongated to align with the threaded holes in this shaft. And apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth choke operation and less wear to shaft and/or carburetor body.
  • Kohler part # 47 090 35-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $27.25 each, plus shipping & handling.
Choke shaft w/short, angled, hand-operated or cable-controlled lever for Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 and Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors with the round air filter housing assembly. Overall shaft length: 2-5/8". Comes with screws and split lock washers. NOTE: This choke shaft is made by Walbro and designed for Walbro choke plates. Therefore, the holes in the OEM Carter or Kohler choke plate (with K stamped in it) may need to be elongated to align with the threaded holes in this shaft. And apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth choke operation and less wear to shaft and/or carburetor body.
  • Kohler part # 47 090 34-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $27.25 each, plus shipping & handling.
Choke shaft w/long, straight, hand-operated or cable-controlled lever for Kohler #26, #30 and Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors with the oblong air filter housing assembly (Quiet Line). Overall shaft length: 2-5/8". Comes with screws and split lock washers. NOTE: This choke shaft is made by Walbro and designed for Walbro choke plates. Therefore, the holes in the OEM Kohler choke plate (with K stamped in it) may need to be elongated to align with the threaded holes in this shaft. And apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth choke operation and less wear to shaft and/or carburetor body.
  • Kohler part # 47 090 38-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $27.25 each, plus shipping & handling.
Choke Shaft w/"Downward Swing" Lever (most common) for Kohler engine models KT17, KT19, KT19II, M18, M20 with Kohler #26 or Walbro WHG #52 carburetor. Overall shaft length: 2-5/8". For carburetors with following numbers stamped on mounting flange: 52 053 09, 52 053 20, 52 053 26, 52 053 28, 52 053 31, 52 053 36, 52 053 37, 52 053 38, 52 053 46, 52 053 50, 52 053 52, 52 053 56, 52 053 58, 52 053 63, 52 053 63, 52 053 66. Comes with screws and split lock washers. NOTE: This choke shaft is made by Walbro and designed for Walbro choke plates. Therefore, the holes in the OEM Kohler choke plate (with K stamped in it) may need to be elongated to align with the threaded holes in this shaft. And apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth choke operation and less wear to shaft and/or carburetor body.
  • Kohler part # 52 090 12-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $24.25 each, plus shipping & handling.

Choke Shaft w/"Upward Swing" Lever for Kohler engine models KT17, KT17II, MV16, M18, MV18, MV20 with Kohler #26 or Walbro WHG #52 carburetor. Overall shaft length: 2-5/8". For carburetors with following numbers stamped on mounting flange: 52 053 18, 52 053 21, 52 053 27, 52 053 32, 52 053 34, 52 053 47, 52 053 51, 52 053 54, 52 053 55, 52 053 59. Comes with screws and split lock washers. NOTE: This choke shaft is made by Walbro and designed for Walbro choke plates. Therefore, the holes in the OEM Kohler choke plate (with K stamped in it) may need to be elongated to align with the threaded holes in this shaft. And apply clean motor oil on shaft before installing for smooth choke operation and less wear to shaft and/or carburetor body.

  • Kohler part # 52 090 13-S. (Made by Walbro; available only from Kohler.) $24.25 each, plus shipping & handling.
Professionally machine YOUR carburetor body and install bronze sleeve bushings for worn choke shaft holes and reinstall original choke shaft (if not excessively worn).
  • $50.00 for parts and labor, plus return shipping & handling.

OEM Kohler Choke Shaft Repair Kits -

  • For Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 and Walbro WHL #44 carburetors. OEM Kohler part # 25 757 20-S. $45.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • For Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors. OEM Kohler part # 25 757 21-S. $41.30 each, plus shipping & handling.
Choke Plate for Kohler engine models K90 (3.6hp), K91 (4hp), K141 (6¼hp), K160 (6.6hp), K161 (7hp) and K181/M8 (8hp) with Walbro WHL #36, #44 or Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 carburetors.
  • OEM Walbro part # 62-130-1. $30.40 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 41 146 16-S. (Made by Walbro.) $7.60 each, plus shipping & handling.
IMPORTANT: For the K241/M10, K301/M12, K321/M14, K341/M16 and K361 choke plates below Ê - If the wrong choke plate is used or mismatched with any particular size engine, due to the size and number of holes in the plate, the engine may become flooded too easily, resulting in either hard starting or a fouled spark plug. Or the engine may not receive enough fuel, resulting in hard starting. (None of these will happen with my remote fuel primer kit.) Also, Walbro and Carter/Kohler choke plates are not interchangeable.
Choke Plate for Kohler engine models K241/M10 (10hp) or K301/M12 (12hp) with Walbro WHG #52 carburetor.
  • Kohler part # 47 146 08-S. (OEM Walbro part # 62-129; available only from Kohler.) $3.10 each, plus shipping & handling.
OEM Kohler Choke Plates for engine models K241/M10 (10hp) or K301/M12 (12hp) with Carter or Kohler #26 carburetors. Used and in excellent condition. No Kohler part number; no longer available from Kohler.
  • $3.00 each, plus shipping & handling. (When available.)
Choke Plate for Kohler engine models K321/M14 (14hp) with Walbro WHG #60, #64 carburetors.
  • OEM Walbro part # 62-128. $1.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 47 146 09-S. (Made by Walbro.) $3.10 each, plus shipping & handling.
OEM Kohler Choke Plate for engine models K321/M14 (14hp) with Carter or Kohler #28 or #30 carburetors. Used and in excellent condition. No Kohler part number; no longer available from Kohler.
  • $3.00 each, plus shipping & handling. (When available.)
Choke Plate for Kohler engine models K341/M16 (16hp) and K361 (18hp OHV) with Walbro WHG #60, #64 carburetors.
  • OEM Walbro part # 62-124-1. $3.30 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 45 146 07-S. (Made by Walbro.) $3.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
OEM Kohler Choke Plate for engine models K341/M16 (16hp) and K361 (18hp OHV) with Carter or Kohler #30 carburetors. Used and in excellent condition. No Kohler part number; no longer available from Kohler.
  • $3.00 each, plus shipping & handling. (When available.)
Choke Friction (Detent) Balls - NOTE: The ball and spring is for hand-operation of the choke only, such as for a generator/welder engine. If choke is cable-operated, such as in a tractor, then the ball and spring isn't needed.

1/8" diameter for all Carter or Kohler #16, #18, #20, #22, #26, #28, #30 and Walbro WHL #36, #44 carburetors.

  • OEM Walbro part # 89-13-8. .35¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 25 194 02-S. (Made by Walbro.) $1.55 each, plus shipping & handling.

5/32" diameter for Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors.

  • OEM Walbro part # 89-29-8. .35¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 25 194 01-S. (Made by Walbro.) $6.80 each, plus shipping & handling.
Choke Friction (Detent) Springs - NOTE: The ball and spring is for hand-operation of the choke only, such as for a generator/welder engine. If choke is cable-operated, such as in a tractor, then the ball and spring isn't needed.

1/8" diameter x 5/16" long for Walbro WHL #36, #44 carburetors. NOTE: The 1/8" diameter x 1/2" long spring for the Carter and Kohler #16, #18, #20, #22, #26, #28, #30 carburetors have been discontinued by Kohler. This 1/8" diameter x 5/16" long spring can be used in these carburetors with an 1/8" diameter x 3/16" long solid spacer placed under spring. (An 1/8" diameter x 3/16" long Allen set screw makes an excellent spacer.)

  • OEM Walbro part # 98-162-7. .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 25 089 06-S. (Made by Walbro.) $1.65 each, plus shipping & handling.

5/32" diameter x 1/2" long for Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 carburetors. NOTE: The 1/8" diameter x 1/2" long spring for the Carter and Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetors have been discontinued by Kohler. It's replaced with the 5/32" diameter spring, which is to be used with the 5/32" ball. The detent hole in the carburetor will need to be drilled out to 5/32" to accommodate the bigger spring and ball. And be careful not to drill the hole deeper, just make it bigger.

  • OEM Walbro part # 98-198-7. .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 25 089 03-S. (Made by Walbro.) $7.20 each, plus shipping & handling.
3/8" diameter aluminum welch (expansion) plug. Replaces welch plug in most Carter, Kohler and Walbro carburetors. No Kohler part number available. OEM Walbro part # 88-180. .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
Throttle or Choke Conduit Cable Snap-On Clip/Clamp. Fastens to L-shaped extended bracket on engine block. OEM Kohler part # 235603-S.
  • $3.75 each, plus shipping & handling.
U-Shape Throttle/Choke Cable Conduit Clamp. Use to secure 3/16" or 7/32" diameter cable conduit to throttle or choke bracket or bundle of wires along frame for safe routing. Zinc-plated steel. Requires 3/16" mounting screw. Can be used in place of clamp above È.
  • Aftermarket. Our part # 03-250. $1.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Briggs and Stratton part # 692179. $3.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
Universal Loop-Type Throttle/Choke Cable Conduit/Wire Clamp. Use to secure 3/16" or 7/32" diameter cable conduit to throttle or choke bracket or bundle of wires along frame for safe routing. 16 gauge, zinc-plated steel. Requires 3/16" mounting screw.
  • Our part # 03-249. $1.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
1/4" Diameter Throttle Cable/Wire Swivel Kit. For securing inner throttle cable or wire to governor lever or throttle lever on carburetor. Kohler part # 48 755 10-S.
  • Aftermarket. Zinc-plated steel. $1.00 each kit, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $11.45 each kit, plus shipping & handling.
Governor Spring for Kohler K-series models K141, K160, K161 and K181. OEM Kohler part # 232617-S.
  • $5.60 each, plus shipping & handling.
Governor Spring for Kohler Magnum model M8 (8hp). OEM Kohler part # 41 089 12-S.
  • $5.60 each, plus shipping & handling.
Throttle Dampening Spring. Can be used on virtually any K-series, Magnum and CH (Command) single- and twin-cylinder cast iron and aluminum block engine. fastens between governor lever and throttle lever to remove free play in linkage and reduce erratic engine behavior due to throttle flutter for a smoother running engine. 93 coils. OEM Kohler part # 230117-S.
  • $7.40 each, plus shipping & handling.
23 Coils (Short) Governor Spring. Designed for Kohler engine models M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), M14 (14hp) and K341 (16hp) used with a generator and/or welder. Also works better than the spring below Ê when used on a competitive stock pulling engine because this one maintains the rpms at a more steady pace. OEM Kohler part # 45 091 01-S.
  • $10.25 each, plus shipping & handling.

26 Coils (Short) Governor Spring. Designed for most Kohler engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 and K361 (18hp OHV). Used in Cub Cadet models: 70, 71, 72, 73, 86, 100, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 149, 169, 1050, 1204, 1210 and 1211. Most common for general yard and garden use. OEM Kohler part # 235496-S.

  • $9.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
23 Coils (Long) Governor Spring. Designed for certain Kohler Magnum engine models M10 (10hp), M12 (12hp), M14 (14hp) and M16 (16hp) used with an air compressor. Also works better than the spring below Ê when used on a competitive stock pulling engine because this one maintains the rpms at a more steady pace. OEM Kohler part # 47 089 07-S.
  • $13.90 each, plus shipping & handling.

26 Coils (Long) Governor Spring. Designed for certain Kohler Magnum engine models M10 (10hp), M12 (12hp), M14 (14hp) and M16 (16hp). For heavy yard & garden use and snow blowing. OEM Kohler part # 47 089 09-S.

  • $4.90 each, plus shipping & handling.

34 Coils (Long) Governor Spring. Designed for Kohler K-series and Magnum engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K321/M14 (14hp) and K341/M16 (16hp). Used in "Quiet Line" Cub Cadet models: 680, 1000, 1200, 1210, 1250, 1282, 1450 and 1650. "Quiet Line" John Deere engines, too. Most common for general yard & garden use. OEM Kohler part # 47 091 01-S.

  • $10.40 each, plus shipping & handling.
Governor Cross Shafts for Kohler engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 (16hp) flatheads, K361 (18hp OHV). NOTE: Before installing, apply clean motor oil on shaft for smooth governor action and less wear to shaft and/or bushing. OEM Kohler part # A-235256-S.
  • Used and welded. $10.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Used and welded. $15.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • New and not welded. $24.60 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • New and welded. $30.00 each, plus shipping & handling.

Steel Spacer for governor cross shaft above È. Kohler part # 25 112 17-S.

  • Aftermarket. $1.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $4.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
Bronze Governor Cross Shaft Bushing for Kohler engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 (16hp) flatheads, K361 (18hp OHV). NOTE: Before installing, apply clean motor oil on shaft for smooth governor action and less wear to shaft and/or bushing. OEM Kohler part # 235476-S.

New. $7.50 each, plus shipping & handling.

Throttle Link for Kohler flathead cast iron block K-series engine model K90 (3.6hp), K91 (4hp). OEM Kohler part # 220380-S.
  • $8.85 each, plus shipping & handling.
Throttle Link for Kohler flathead cast iron block K-series engine models K141 (6¼hp), K160 (6.6hp), K161 (7hp) and K181 (8hp) with .086" (#44 drill bit size) hole in governor lever and throttle lever. OEM Kohler part # 230078-S.
  • $9.90 each, plus shipping & handling.
Throttle Link and Nylon Bushing for Kohler flathead cast iron block Magnum model M8 (8hp) with 3/16" hole in governor lever and throttle lever. OEM Kohler part # 25 079 01-S.
  • Throttle Link. OEM Kohler part only. $3.85 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Nylon bushing for above È link. OEM Kohler part # 25 158 08-S. $1.30 each, plus shipping & handling.
New Style Throttle Linkage Kit. Fits Kohler K-series and Magnum engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 flatheads, K361 (18hp OHV) with 3/16" hole in governor lever and throttle lever.
  • Throttle Link. OEM Kohler part # 47 079 11-S. $2.30 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Nylon bushing for above È link. OEM Kohler part # 25 158 11-S. $1.20 each, plus shipping & handling.
Throttle Rods for Early Style Throttle Linkage. Fits Kohler K-series and Magnum engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 flatheads, K361 (18hp OHV) with 3/16" hole in governor lever. 3/16" diameter rod x 10-32 NF threads. OEM Kohler part # 235277-S.
  • Used and in good condition. $9.00 each, plus shipping & handling. (When available.)
  • New. $18.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
All Metal, Early Style Linkage Assembly with Snap-On Throttle Ball Joint Body. Fits Kohler K-series and Magnum engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 flatheads, K361 (18hp OHV) with 3/16" hole in governor lever and ball on throttle lever. OEM Kohler part #'s 235277-S (rod) and 45 208 03-S (snap-on ball joint body).
  • Used and in good condition. $15.00 per assembly, plus shipping & handling. (When available.)
  • New Assembly. $28.00 per assembly, plus shipping & handling.
All Metal, Early Style Throttle Linkage Assembly with Integrated Ball w/Threaded Stud. Fits Kohler K-series and Magnum engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 flatheads, K361 (18hp OHV) with 3/16" hole in governor lever and without ball on throttle lever. OEM Kohler part #'s 235277-S (rod) and 237130-S (ball joint w/integrated ball).
  • Used and in good condition. $16.00 per assembly, plus shipping & handling. (When available.)
  • New Assembly. $32.00 per assembly, plus shipping & handling.
New 3/16" Throttle Ball Joint w/Integrated Ball/Threaded Stud for Kohler K-series and Magnum engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K330/K331 (12½hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 flatheads, K361 (18hp OHV) with early style throttle linkage. Can also be used on mini rods, hot rods, race cars, etc. 10-32 NF male and female threads. Kohler part # 237130-S.
  • Aftermarket. $5.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $14.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
Snap-On Ball Joint Body with Throttle Ball/Threaded Stud for Kohler K-series and Magnum engine models K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp), K321/M14 (14hp), K341/M16 flatheads, K361 (18hp OHV) with early style throttle linkage. Can also be used on mini rods, hot rods, race cars, etc. 10-32 NF male and female threads. Kohler part #'s 45 208 03-S (snap-on ball joint body) and 48 194 01-S (throttle ball w/threaded stud).
  • Aftermarket. $16.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
Early Style Throttle Snap-On Ball Joint Body. Fits Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 and Walbro #52, #60, #64 carburetors with ball on throttle lever. Can also be used on mini rods, hot rods, race cars, etc. 10-32 NF female threads and accepts 1/4" diameter ball. OEM Kohler part # 45 208 03-S.
  • New. $9.80 each, plus shipping & handling.
Throttle Ball w/Threaded Stud for Snap-On Ball Joint Body above È. 1/4" diameter ball x 10-32 NF threads. Fits Carter or Kohler #26, #28, #30 and Walbro #52, #60, #64 carburetors without ball on throttle lever. Can also be used on mini rods, hot rods, race cars, etc. Discontinued from Kohler. Replaces Kohler part # 48 194 01-S.
  • Used, OEM. $5.00 each, plus shipping & handling. (When available.)
  • New, aftermarket. $10.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
E-Clip (Retainer) for Early Style 3/16" Throttle Linkage above È. Kohler part # 235278-S.
  • Aftermarket. .25¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $3.10 each, plus shipping & handling.
Throttle Linkage Kit for Kohler flathead twin cylinder engine models KT17, KT17II, KT19, KT19II and KT21 with .086" (#44 drill bit size) hole in governor lever and throttle lever. OEM Kohler part # 52 079 11-S.
  • $11.60 each, plus shipping & handling.
Throttle Linkage Kit for Kohler Magnum M18 and M20 flathead twin cylinder engines with 3/16" hole in governor lever and throttle lever.
  • Throttle Link and Nylon Bushing Kit. OEM Kohler part # 82 755 07-S. $5.10 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Nylon bushing for above È link. OEM Kohler part # 25 158 11-S. $1.20 each, plus shipping & handling.
Remote Carburetor Fuel Primer Kit. Safe to use and works flawlessly! The primer bulb system squirts gas into the carburetor throttle bore, causing a small flooding condition so a cold engine will start easier. It replaces the choke plate/shaft. For ordinary garden tractors, garden pulling tractors or virtually any type of small engine lawn and garden equipment. Works with pump gas or alcohol fuels. Kit includes primer bulb assembly w/mounting nut, 3' of 1/8" i.d. clear vinyl hose and 1/8" x 1" brass tube (to install on side of carburetor for new atmospheric vent hole). An original concept by Brian Miller.
  • $15.00 per kit, plus shipping & handling.
  • Fuel Primer Bulb Assembly Only. Comes with installation nut. $7.00 each, plus shipping.
Plastic In-Line Fuel Filter. Fits 1/4" i.d. fuel hose. 1-3/8" diameter x 1-3/4" long. 75 micron. For engines with gravity feed or fuel pump.
  • Aftermarket. Our part # 21-1022. $3.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part # 25 755 22-S. $33.55 each, plus shipping & handling.
Black Neoprene Rubber Reinforced Fuel Hose. For 100% gas, E85 or methanol fuels. 1/4" i.d. x 1/2" o.d.
  • $1.20 per foot, plus shipping & handling.
Spring-loaded fuel hose clamp for 1/4" i.d. x 1/2" o.d. black neoprene rubber reinforced fuel hose to the left ß. Necessary when using a fuel pump and for safety.
  • .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
Straight 1/4" nipple x 1/8" NPT male threads fuel hose fittings.
  • New brass fitting. $3.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Used OEM Kohler steel fitting. $1.50 each, plus shipping & handling. (When available.)
90° angle 1/4" nipple x 1/8" NPT male threads fuel hose fittings.
  • New brass fitting. $3.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Used OEM Kohler steel fitting. $1.50 each, plus shipping & handling. (When available.)
Fuel Hose Upgrade/Conversion Kit

Do away with the old-fashioned sediment fuel filter and metal fuel line. This upgrade/conversion kit includes 1/4" i.d. x 12" long reinforced black fuel hose, clear in-line filter, one straight 1/4" nipple x 1/8" NPT threads fitting (threads into gas tank) and one 90° angle 1/4" nipple x 1/8" NPT threads fitting (threads into carburetor) and four spring-type fuel hose clamps. The fuel hose is routed under carburetor. This kit is for Kohler engines with the gas tank positioned higher than the carburetor. An original concept by Brian Miller.

  • With used OEM Kohler fuel fittings. $13.00 per kit, plus shipping & handling.
  • With new brass fuel fittings. $16.00 per kit, plus shipping & handling.
Plastic In-Line Fuel Shut-Off Valve. Fits 1/4" i.d. fuel hose. No filter. Required by certain pulling associations/clubs for safety. $6.00 each, plus shipping & handling. Part # 23-5841 All Metal In-Line Fuel Shut-Off Valve. Fits 1/4" i.d. fuel hose. No filter. Required by certain pulling associations/clubs for safety. $12.00 each, plus shipping & handling. Part # 24-1166
Tank-Mounted 90° Angle Fuel Shut-Off Valve with fine mesh screen filter. Has 1/8" NPT mounting threads and fits 1/4" i.d. fuel hose. Threads into gas tank. Replacement for Gravely, Kohler, Lawn-Boy, Snapper, Tecumseh, etc. Has alcohol-resistant neoprene rubber O-ring seal. $6.50 each, plus shipping & handling. Part # 20-1347
Alcohol-resistant neoprene rubber O-ring seal for shut-off valve above È. Replace dry-rotted O-ring which cause leaking fuel. Dimensions: 1/16" x 3/16" x 5/16". .25¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
Fuel Tank Bushing (Grommet) for Cub Cadet "Quiet Line" models and Kohler Magnum engines. Made of neoprene rubber. Use oil or grease for easy installation into 33/64" hole on bottom of gas tank. Replaces: AMF 42690; Ariens 07509300, 07511400; Bolens 1738433; Briggs Power Products 78299GS, 80269GS; Exmark 1-513645; Ferris 22151; Kohler 25 313 01-S; Lawn-Boy 104047, 708331, 46-6560; MTD 735-0149, 1738433, 935-0149, 1903198, 1902479, GW-1738433, GW-B1738433, 581615; Murray 42690; Noma 44847; Scag 48309; Simplicity 1654930; Snapper 12337, 74158, 7012337, 7074158; Tecumseh 33679; Toro 46-6560, 1-513645, E513645; Wheel Horse/Toro 104047; 104047P.
  • Aftermarket. $1.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part. $1.70 each, plus shipping & handling.
L-shaped Fuel Tank Shut-Off Valve w/o filter screen for Cub Cadet "Quiet Line" models and Kohler Magnum engines. 1/2" fitting fastens in neoprene rubber bushing (above È) in bottom of gas tank. Use oil or grease for easy installation. 1/4" fuel hose fitting. Requires in-line fuel filter. Replaces Cub Cadet part # IH-109042-C2.
  • Our part # 120-253. $8.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
L-shaped Fuel Tank Shut-Off Valve w/filter screen for Kohler Magnum Engines and Cub Cadet "Quiet Line" models and Kohler Magnum engines. 1/2" fitting fastens in neoprene rubber bushing (above È) in bottom of gas tank. Use oil or grease for easy installation. 1/4" fuel hose fitting. In-line fuel filter not required.
  • Aftermarket. Our part # 24-1132. $6.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Kohler part # 25 462 01-S. $20.15 each, plus shipping & handling.
Fuel Shut-Off/Filter/Sediment Bowl Assembly. Replacement for many older lawn and garden engines. Threads into bottom of gas tank. Dimensions: Overall height: 3"; Maximum width (not including shut-off valve): 1-3/4"; Thread fittings: inlet (top) and outlet (side) are both 1/8" NPT. Complete assembly no longer available from Kohler. Use fuel hose upgrade/conversion kit (above È) instead if you wish. Replaces: Kohler A-210101 (discontinued); Briggs & Stratton 293964, 295913, 295977, 296005, 393169, 690612; Clinton 293-32-500, 293-32-5; Gravely 013013; John Deere PT4337; Tecumseh 24449, 24459, 32164, 32439, 32984, 32984A, 34279, 34279A, 34279B; Wisconsin LP43.
  • Aftermarket. $11.50 each, plus shipping & handling. Our part # 21-1009
Replacement glass bowl for fuel shut-off/filter/sediment bowl assembly above È. Dimensions: 1-1/2" maximum width x 1-1/8" height. Replaces: Briggs & Stratton # 298683; John Deere # PT4271.
  • Aftermarket. $3.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part # 210467-S. $9.55 each, plus shipping & handling.
Fine Mesh Screen Filter for Sediment Bowl Assembly above È. 1-1/4" o.d.
  • OEM Briggs & Stratton part #'s 22547, 691962. Made of steel. $3.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part # 210479-S. Made of brass. $3.70 each, plus shipping & handling.
Sediment bowl gasket (seal) for glass bowl on fuel shut-off/filter/sediment bowl assembly above È. Made of alcohol resistant neoprene rubber.
  • Aftermarket. Our part # 20-1503. $1.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part # 210468-S. $3.40 each, plus shipping & handling.
Fuel Shut-Off Valve for Filter/Sediment Bowl Assembly above È. Includes neoprene rubber O-ring seal (below Ê).
  • Aftermarket. Our part # 24-1046. $8.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler part # A-210480-S. $12.20 each, plus shipping & handling.
O-ring seal for shut-off valve shaft in fuel shut-off/filter/sediment bowl assembly above È. Replace cracked/dry-rotted O-ring which can cause leaking fuel. Made of alcohol resistant neoprene rubber. Dimensions: 1/16" x 1/8" x 1/4".
  • Aftermarket. .25¢ each, plus shipping & handling.

Air Filters and Prefilters (reticulated foam wraps) -
If you need any of the items listed below Ê, please contact A-1 Miller's Performance Enterprises | 1501 W. Old Plank Rd. | Columbia, MO 65203-9136 USA | Phone: 1-573-875-4033. Please call Monday-Friday (except Holidays), 9am to 5pm, Central time zone. If no answer, please try again later. (When speaking with Brian, please be patient because I stutter.) Fax: 1-573-449-7347. E-mail: pullingtractor@aol.com. You can also contact us through Yahoo! Messenger: Find us here: Directions to our shop | Yahoo! Maps, 1501 W. Old Plank Rd., Columbia, MO | 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO - Google Maps or Map of 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO by MapQuest. Go here for more parts: Carburetor, Fuel System Parts & Machine Shop Services | NOTE: To place an order, please call or send an email with a list and description of the parts or services you need. Because as of right now, we're not set up to accept orders through our web sites online.
Air Filter and Prefilter (foam wrap) for Kohler K-series K90 (3.6hp), K91 (4hp), K141 (6¼hp) and K161 (7hp) cast iron block flathead engines. Air filter: Kohler 230840-S; Cub Cadet 385163R2; Clinton 002-0233-00; Gravely 20299; John Deere AM31034; Massey 1035-991-M1; Tecumseh 30804. Dimensions: 4-3/8" o.d. x 3" i.d. x 1-1/2" overall height. Prefilter: Kohler part # 234870-S; John Deere AM31034; Massey Ferguson 1035-991.
  • Aftermarket air filter. $4.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
    • Aftermarket prefilter. $2.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler air filter. $17.45 each, plus shipping & handling.
    • OEM Kohler prefilter. $5.90 each, plus shipping & handling.

NOTE: To clean the foam prefilter, use cleaning solvent (paint thinner) and [150± psi] compressed air, allow to thoroughly dry, but do not add oil. Oil is not recommended for use in foam prefilters because some of the oil may be drawn into the paper element while the engine is running, partially clogging it.

Air Filter and Prefilter (foam wrap) for Kohler K-series and Magnum K181/M8 (8hp) cast iron block flathead engines. Air filter: Kohler part # 231847-S, 47 883 01-S1 (kit); Cub Cadet part # 548436R1; Gravely 15373; John Deere AM30800; Tecumseh 31925; Onan 140-1188, 140-188; Rol Air 431. Dimensions: 4-3/8" o.d. x 3" i.d. x 2-5/16" overall height. Prefilter: Kohler part #'s 234869-S (K-series), 41 083 04-S (Magnum).
  • Aftermarket air filter. $5.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
    • Aftermarket prefilter. $3.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler air filter w/prefilter kit. $11.60 each, plus shipping & handling.
    • OEM Kohler air filter. $11.10 each, plus shipping & handling.
      • OEM Kohler prefilter. $5.90 each, plus shipping & handling.

NOTE: To clean the foam prefilter, use cleaning solvent (paint thinner) and [150± psi] compressed air, allow to thoroughly dry, but do not add oil. Oil is not recommended for use in foam prefilters because some of the oil may be drawn into the paper element while the engine is running, partially clogging it.

Air Filter and Prefilter (foam wrap) for Kohler K-series and Magnum K241/M10 (10hp), K301/M12 (12hp) and K321/M14 (14hp) cast iron block flathead engines with the short round air filter housing assembly. Air filter: Kohler part #'s 235116-S, 47 883 01-S1 (kit); Cub Cadet part # 385168R2. Dimensions: 6" o.d. x 4-11/16" i.d. x 1-7/8" overall height. Prefilter: Kohler part # 237421-S (K-series), 45 083 01-S (Magnum).
  • Aftermarket air filter. $6.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
    • Aftermarket prefilter. $2.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler air filter w/prefilter kit. $11.60 each plus shipping & handling.
    • OEM Kohler air filter. $9.75 each, plus shipping & handling.
      • OEM Kohler prefilter. $3.75 each, plus shipping & handling.

NOTE: To clean the foam prefilter, use cleaning solvent (paint thinner) and [150± psi] compressed air, allow to thoroughly dry, but do not add oil. Oil is not recommended for use in foam prefilters because some of the oil may be drawn into the paper element while the engine is running, partially clogging it.

Air Filter and Prefilter (foam wrap) for Kohler Quiet Line series engines in Cub Cadet models 680, 1000, 1050, 1200, 1204, 1211, 1250, 1282, 1450 and 1650. Fits Kohler engine models K241, K301, K321, K341, CH11-15, KT17, KT19, and M18-20; for 18 thru 20hp engines with the oblong air filter housing assembly. Air filter: Kohler part # 47 083 01-S, 47 883 01-S1 (kit); Cub Cadet 117210-C1, 759-3547, 959-3547; Gravely 032494, John Deere M83646, Lesco 012596. Dimensions: 7" o.d. x 5-1/2" i.d. x 1-3/4" overall height. Prefilter: Kohler part # 52 083 01-S.
  • Aftermarket air filter. $6.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
    • Aftermarket prefilter. $2.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler air filter w/prefilter kit. $11.60 each, plus shipping & handling.
    • OEM Kohler air filter. $9.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
      • OEM Kohler prefilter. $3.75 each, plus shipping & handling.

NOTE: To clean the foam prefilter, use cleaning solvent (paint thinner) and [150± psi] compressed air, allow to thoroughly dry, but do not add oil. Oil is not recommended for use in foam prefilters because some of the oil may be drawn into the paper element while the engine is running, partially clogging it.

Air Filter and Prefilter (foam wrap) for Kohler 10hp through 20hp Quiet Line series engines. Fits Kohler engine models K341, CH18-25, CV18-22, KT17II, KT19II and M18-20; for 17 thru 22hp engines with the oblong air filter housing assembly. Kohler part #'s 47 083 03-S, 47 883 03-S1 (kit); John Deere M47494 (fits JD models 200, 210, 212, 214, 216, 300, 312, 314, 316, 400); Woods 71803. Dimensions: 7" o.d. x 5-1/2" i.d. x 2-7/16"" overall height. Prefilter: Kohler part # 41 083 04-S.
  • Aftermarket air filter. $6.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
    • Aftermarket prefilter. $2.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler air filter w/prefilter kit. $11.45 each, plus shipping & handling.
    • OEM Kohler air filter. $9.30 each, plus shipping & handling.
      • OEM Kohler prefilter. $3.75 each, plus shipping & handling.

NOTE: To clean the foam prefilter, use cleaning solvent (paint thinner) and [150± psi] compressed air, allow to thoroughly dry, but do not add oil. Oil is not recommended for use in foam prefilters because some of the oil may be drawn into the paper element while the engine is running, partially clogging it.

Neoprene Rubber Seal for Air Cleaner Cover to Base. Reduces air intake noise. For following Kohler AQS (Quiet Line) engine models K181, K241/M10, K301/M12, K321/M14, K341/M16, K532 and K582. 28-1/4" long x 1/2" wide. OEM Kohler part # 47 032 03-S.
  • Used and in excellent condition. $3.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • New. $6.40 each, plus shipping & handling.
Neoprene Rubber Tube for Air Cleaner Base to Flywheel Housing. Reduces air intake noise. For following Kohler AQS (Quiet Line) engine models K241/M10, K301/M12, K321/M14, K341/M16, KT17, M18, M20, K532 and K582. OEM Kohler part # 47 134 02-S.
  • Used and in excellent condition. $18.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • New. $24.60 each, plus shipping & handling.
Air Filter and Prefilter (foam wrap) for K341 (16hp), M20, 26hp and 27hp Kohler K-series and Magnum engines with the tall round air filter housing assembly. Can also be used on mini rods, hot rods, race cars, etc. with an automotive engine and 2-barrel carburetor. Kohler part # 45 083 02-S, 45 883 02-S1 (kit); Cub Cadet part # 61606C/1759-3359. Dimensions: 6" o.d. x 4-11/16" i.d. x 3" overall height. Prefilter: Kohler part # 45 083 01-S.
  • Aftermarket air filter. $6.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
    • Aftermarket prefilter. $3.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler air filter w/prefilter kit. $11.90 each, plus shipping & handling.
    • OEM Kohler air filter. $10.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
      • OEM Kohler prefilter. $3.75 each, plus shipping & handling.

NOTE: To clean the foam prefilter, use cleaning solvent (paint thinner) and [150± psi] compressed air, allow to thoroughly dry, but do not add oil. Oil is not recommended for use in foam prefilters because some of the oil may be drawn into the paper element while the engine is running, partially clogging it.

Air Filter and Prefilter (foam wrap) for certain Kohler engine models K241 (10hp), K301 (12hp), K341 (16hp) and K582 (23hp) with the tall round air filter housing assembly. Can also be used on mini rods, hot rods, race cars, etc. with an automotive engine and 2-barrel carburetor. Air filter: Kohler part # 277138-S. Dimensions: 6" o.d. x 4-3/4" i.d. x 4" overall height. Prefilter: Kohler part # 277593-S.
  • Aftermarket air filter. $5.50 each, plus shipping & handling.
    • Aftermarket prefilter. $2.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Kohler air filter. $18.60 each, plus shipping & handling.
    • OEM Kohler prefilter. $14.50 each, plus shipping & handling.

NOTE: To clean the foam prefilter, use cleaning solvent (paint thinner) and [150± psi] compressed air, allow to thoroughly dry, but do not add oil. Oil is not recommended for use in foam prefilters because some of the oil may be drawn into the paper element while the engine is running, partially clogging it.

NOTE: Air filters and prefilters are available for many other makes and models of engines. If you need something that's not listed here, please contact me with your engine model and spec number and I'll see if I can get it at a reasonable price.


Information About the Carburetor Extension, Spacer, Intake Tube, Stand-Off, (or whatever they may be called) -

Spacing the carburetor away from the engine block allows the fuel to atomize better (break down into smaller particles) so the engine will produce more power and torque at higher rpms. The further the carburetor is spaced, the better the fuel will atomize.

When choosing the length of an intake tube, it seems that a 3" length works best for gas, and 5" length works best for E85 or methanol. Because gas runs more lean than E85 or methanol, it requires less space or distance to fully atomize, and being E85 and methanol fuels run richer, they need more space or distance to fully atomize before they enter the combustion chamber.

For pulling competition, if no [long] intake tube is to be used with the carburetor, a heat isolator gasket will work great. It isolates the carburetor from the engine heat so the fuel will atomize better (break down into smaller particles) before it enters the combustion chamber, which will help the engine produce more power.

Also for pulling competition, with a carburetor extension in use, mounting gaskets are not necessary. Just resurface the ends of the extension (if needed) and carburetor mounting flange so it's perfectly flat (I use the side of the cutting wheel on my 14" chop saw. Works great! Be sure to use eye protection!), and then apply a thin bead of Clear RTV Silicone Adhesive Sealant with no gasket. By doing this, there is NO WAY the flange can warp or possibly break! By the way - I've always preferred to use Clear RTV Silicone Adhesive Sealant for two reasons: being it's an adhesive, it bonds parts together, forming a leak-proof seal; and being it's clear, it makes for a clean-looking repair job. It can't be seen between the parts.


Use a Bigger Air Filter on a Pulling Engine -

If an engine has a carburetor with a bored-out venturi, bigger ports, bigger valves, a big cam and it runs at wide open throttle, then it will definitely benefit from use of a bigger air filter. All of these things will undoubtedly allow an engine to draw in a lot more air at high rpms. If rules require that the engine must have an air filter, stack two air filters on top of each other (install a longer mounting stud, too), or use an OEM K341/K361 or twin cylinder air filter housing assembly (they're twice as tall than the 10, 12 or 14hp air filter) or install a velocity stack and use an aftermarket K&N air filter. The bigger air filter is so free-flowing and less restrictive, using an air filter this size would the same as not using an air filter all. The shorter 10, 12 or 14hp air filter housing assembly is too restrictive for wide open throttle operation. But if it's a basically stock engine with a stock carburetor, stock size ports and valves, and a stock cam, there'll be very little gained with a bigger air filter. If you pull on a lot of dusty tracks, then it would be worth investing in an air filter to save wear on the engine.


How to Repair Stripped Air Cleaner Base Mounting Holes in the Carter, Kohler #26, #28, #30 or Walbro WHG #52, #60, #64 Carburetors when the original holes are too big for Heli-Coil thread inserts or even 12-24 screws:

  1. Part needed: Several inches of mild steel 1/4-20 NC threaded rod. If the holes are already 1/4", then use 5/16-18 NC threaded rod. (All Thread, long threaded rod or long threaded bolt.) NOTE: 5/16" is the maximum that can fit.
  2. Enlarge the stripped hole(s) in the carburetor body with a 13/64" (for 1/4" threads) or 17/64" (for 5/16" threads) drill bit.
  3. Cut threads in the drilled hole(s) with a 1/4-20 NC or 5/6-18 NC tap.
  4. Apply high strength liquid threadlocker in the drilled and tapped hole(s), then install a short length (1/4" long) of the threaded rod in the hole(s).
  5. When the high strength liquid threadlocker has fully cured (usually takes 24 hours at room temperature), cut off the threaded rod(s) flush with the carburetor body. If a choke plate is going to be used, make sure the end of the threaded rod(s) will not to interfere with movement of the choke shaft. If necessary, grind interference of the stud with a Dremel or equivalent small grinder chucked with a chainsaw sharpening stone.
  6. Use a flat sanding disc or belt sander to grind the stud(s) until they are flush with the carburetor body. (Resurface choke flange.)
  7. Place a punch mark in dead center of the stud(s).
  8. Drill an 11/64" hole through the stud(s).
  9. Use a 1/4" drill bit to chamfer or bevel the hole in the stud(s).
  10. Use a 10-32 NF tap to cut threads in the stud(s), creating threaded insert(s).
  11. Apply oil or grease on the threads of the mounting screws or in the threaded holes, and the air cleaner base or a velocity stack can now be securely fastened to the carburetor.


Never Over-Tighten the Mounting Bolts or Use Multiple Gaskets When Fastening the Carburetor to an Engine!

When installing the carburetor to an engine, the use of two or more gaskets and then torquing the mounting bolts to specs, or just over-tightening the bolts will severely warp the mounting flange on a carburetor, causing it to bend, which will create a vacuum leak, or worse yet, being cast aluminum don't bend or flex too easily, the flange could break. See photo to the right. è So remember, before installing any carburetor, first resurface the mounting flange on a flat sanding disc or flat belt sander until it's perfectly flat, and for general yard use, install just one thin (.030" thickness) gasket or one (3/16" thickness) heat isolator gasket. And use the "two-bolt torque" procedure! To do this, lightly tighten the first bolt, then lightly tighten the second bolt. And tighten the first bolt securely, and then tighten the second bolt securely.

If a Carter #16, #18, #20, #22 or Carter/Kohler #26, #28, #30 carburetor body is broken, damaged beyond repair, or if the bottom threads strips out where the bowl retaining screw fastens, the carburetor body is 100% scrap metal. There is no way to fix this. But the parts on the carburetor body are considered valuable and can be used on another carburetor body that's in good condition (if some of the parts are in fact reusable). Parts such as: throttle and choke shafts and plates, choke friction (detent) ball and spring, idle speed adjusting screw and spring, idle fuel mixture screw and spring, high speed main fuel needle adjuster and spring, main jet/nozzle, fuel inlet valve and seat (if not worn and leaks fuel), float, float pin, float bowl, neoprene rubber o-ring seal, fuel baffle splash shield, bowl retaining screw, and fuel hose fitting. Some of these parts are no longer available new and Kohler is discontinuing many of these parts as time goes on. Some parts may still be available in aftermarket though.


Use a Remote Fuel Primer Bulb System to Start a Cold Engine - Top of page

If the Carter or Kohler carburetor on a lawn or garden machine, or pulling tractor don't have a choke plate assembly installed, but does have an air filter with perhaps a velocity stack, and if the engine have to be "hand choked" to start it, then you probably already know how hard it is to get your hand sealed over the entire velocity stack or end of the carburetor, and also have a wet hand from the fuel afterwards. And having a small hose connected to the atmospheric vent hole in the carburetor is a lot safer than having raw fuel spilling out of the drilled hole on the side of the carburetor when pulling! Well, an inexpensive and safe way to get extra fuel into the throttle bore to start a cold engine is to use a remote fuel primer bulb system. This system can also be adapted for use on ordinary garden tractors, lawn and garden equipment or virtually any type of small engine equipment with virtually any type of carburetor. This system is similar to the same setup that many small engine manufacturers use on their engines nowadays. Works with pump gas or alcohol fuels. This an original concept by Brian Miller.

How it works: With the original atmospheric vent hole(s) in the carburetor plugged, a short brass tube is inserted into a drilled hole in the float bowl area on the side of the carburetor body, and with a small fuel hose connecting the carburetor to the primer bulb assembly, which is mounted on the steering dash/tower/pedestal, a couple of quick pushes on the primer bulb (with your finger over the hole in the bulb to seal in the air) creates air pressure within the float bowl, which force fuel up through the main jet/nozzle, creating a slight flooding condition in the throttle bore. Thus, helping a cold engine without a choke plate start much easier. With this system, the engine cannot be "over-choked" either.

Advertisement:
If you need a remote fuel primer kit, please contact A-1 Miller's Performance Enterprises | 1501 W. Old Plank Rd. | Columbia, MO 65203-9136 USA | Phone: 1-573-875-4033. Please call Monday-Friday (except Holidays), 9am to 5pm, Central time zone. If no answer, please try again later. (When speaking with Brian, please be patient because I stutter.) Fax: 1-573-449-7347. E-mail: pullingtractor@aol.com. You can also contact us through Yahoo! Messenger: Find us here: Directions to our shop | Yahoo! Maps, 1501 W. Old Plank Rd., Columbia, MO | 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO - Google Maps or Map of 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO by MapQuest. Go here for more parts: Carburetor, Fuel System Parts & Machine Shop Services | NOTE: To place an order, please call or send an email with a list and description of the parts or services you need. Because as of right now, we're not set up to accept orders through our web sites online.

Remote Carburetor Fuel Primer Kit. Safe to use and works flawlessly! The primer bulb system squirts gas into the carburetor throttle bore, causing a slight flooding condition so a cold engine will start easier. It replaces the choke plate/shaft. For ordinary garden tractors, garden pulling tractors or virtually any type of small engine lawn and garden equipment. Works with pump gas or alcohol fuels. Kit includes primer bulb assembly w/mounting nut, 3' of 1/8" i.d. clear vinyl hose and 1/8" x 1" brass tube (to install on side of carburetor for new atmospheric vent hole). An original concept by Brian Miller.

  • Complete Kit. $15.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Fuel Primer Bulb Assembly Only. Comes with mounting nut. $7.00 each, plus shipping.

How to Install and Use the Remote Fuel Primer Bulb System:

  1. Remove carburetor from engine and plug the atmospheric vent hole(s). For the main hole that's located at the 2:00 position next to the choke plate, cut some short threads for a 1/4" Allen set screw and install the screw. And if there's a small hole behind the choke plate, cut 3-48 threads in it and install a 3-48 screw with high strength liquid threadlocker. See photo to the right. The hole in the primer bulb will become the new atmospheric vent hole for the carburetor.
  2. Use [150± psi] compressed air to clear out the metal cuttings from inside the float bowl area.
  3. Drill an 1/8" hole in the float bowl area, just above the float fuel level to install the 1/8" tubing to connect the primer hose. On the Carter or Kohler carburetor, this would be just above the bowl seal and below the atmospheric vent passageway on the right side of the carburetor when viewed from the choke end. The drilled hole should be a press-fit for the 1/8" tubing. Use high strength liquid threadlocker to secure the tube in the hole then gently tap the tubing in the hole with a small hammer until it is flush with the inside of the float bowl area. See photo to the right.
  4. Drill a 17/64" hole to install the primer bulb assembly someplace on the tractor within easy reach of the driver.
  5. Route the primer hose along the tractor so it won't get kinked, pinched or damaged and away from the hot exhaust area. Then attach the hose from the 1/8" fitting on the carburetor to the primer bulb assembly.
  6. Press the primer bulb quickly a few times with your finger to create pressure within the float bowl, and at the same time, look inside the carburetor. Fuel should come out of the main nozzle with each push. And then the engine should be quick to start! NOTE: It only takes a couple of pushes to start the engine. Any more, and the engine will become flooded and be hard to start! Also, if an engine hesitates upon acceleration, especially before reaching its operating temperature (cold engine), this system can also be used as an auxiliary accelerator pump.

FYI - Most engines will not start when gas is introduced directly onto the combustion chamber through the spark plug hole. This only results in a flooding condition and the engine may not start. Gas (or starting fluid) needs to be mixed with air through the carburetor so it can atomize to burn thoroughly so the engine will be able to start.

When removing the choke plate and shaft, there's a tiny (1/8") steel ball and spring located at the 9:00 position when facing the choke end with the float area toward you. This is the detent to retain the choke plate in the open position when a cable isn't attached to the choke lever. When the choke shaft is removed, hold one finger over the screw hole and choke shaft hole to prevent the ball and spring from flying out and possibly getting lost.


Fabricate a Foolproof Type of Foot-Operated Throttle Control Setup on a Pulling Tractor - Top of page

For a fancy and noticeable gas pedal, install a chrome-plated, die-cast aluminum "barefoot" pedal. These were popular in the late '60s to early '70s as a nostalgic item mainly on street rod and hot rod vehicles. They're available on eBay. Use a medium size household door hinge to fasten the pedal to the foot rest on the tractor.

To fabricate the throttle linkage and levers, run a 3/16" diameter steel rod from the pedal, up to a bellcrank (lever), then fasten the lever to a 5/16" diameter steel rod. Run the rod through the steering column support and then fabricate another bellcrank (lever) on the other end of the 5/16" rod, and connect that to another 3/16" diameter steel rod which goes forward and attaches to the throttle lever on the carburetor.

I made our own bellcranks (or levers) from 1/2" x 1/8" x about 2" long mild steel. I simply drilled a hole in each end (3/16" and 5/16") and clamped one end of the lever with a locknut on the 5/16" rod so I can loosen the nuts to make adjustments as necessary, and the other hole in the lever is for the 3/16" rod. Install a lightweight return spring from the pedal to the tractor frame. And look your tractor over to determine where the holes should be drilled through the steering column support. Just don't drill the holes where the steering column will be in the way.

If properly installed and adjusted, I believe that this type of throttle control is absolutely the best design. It will never fail on virtually any tractor. It also works much better and with less friction than the cable design. There's no parts to wear and there's no sliding cable that can bind and eventually break, causing one to lose a good pull. And being virtually all tractors are different in design, I offer no kits for these. You'll have to fabricate your own. And the reason foot pedals are more popular than hand throttles is because both hands are needed on the steering wheel to control the tractor as it's going down the track.

Oh, and if you've ever wondered what a "dead man's throttle" is, it's a hand or foot operated spring-loaded throttle control that automatically returns the throttle plate to the idle position when the pressure is released. It works the same as the gas pedal in a car. Top of page


Repairing Various Older Briggs & Stratton Carburetors Top of page


Repairing the carburetor on an older 3hp, 3.5hp or 4hp B&S engine with either a Vacu-Jet or Pulsa-Jet diaphragm carburetor -

First of all, the Vacu-Jet carburetor operates off of engine vacuum to delivery fuel to the engine. (The very first Vacu-Jet carburetors have a manual choke, and no diaphragm. The second design Vacu-Jet carburetor uses a diaphragm, and have a manual choke. The third design Vacu-Jet uses a diaphragm and has an automatic choke.) And the Pulsa-Jet has a built-in fuel pump to delivery fuel to the engine. Both of the [newest design] Vacu-Jet and Pulsa-Jet carburetors have an automatic choke. If either of these carburetors run rich on fuel, and the choke will not open after starting, what has happened is where the carburetor is fastened to the gas tank, these two "mating surfaces" has become warped. This is caused by over-tightening of the air filter housing screw. To fix this...

  1. Remove the carburetor/gas tank from the engine.
  2. Remove the carburetor from the tank and completely disassemble the carburetor.
  3. Resurface the carburetor base either with a large, flat file or wide, flat sanding disc. (I use the side of the cutting wheel on my 14" chop saw. Works great! Be sure to use eye protection!) The gas tank will need to be resurfaced using a large, flat file. Be careful when resurfacing using a file! Make sure the entire surface is cut straight across evenly, or very little will be gained.
  4. After resurfacing, use [150± psi] compressed air to clear out the air and fuel passageways in the carburetor and gas tank.
  5. A new diaphragm will need to be installed. NOTE: If it's a Pulsa-Jet, place the fuel pump spring and protective cap in the carburetor recess, and not in the gas tank recess.


How to Repair the Vacu-Jet (3hp) or Pulsa-Jet (3.5 or 4hp) Automatic Choke Carburetor on a Vertical Shaft Briggs & Stratton Flathead Engine -

  1. Remove the carburetor and gas tank from the engine as a unit.
  2. Remove the choke rod cover from the carburetor and the carburetor from the gas tank.
  3. Remove the fuel pickup tubes with a 3/8" and 9/16" 6-point socket. Be careful not to twist them off in the carburetor!
  4. Gently clamp the carburetor (and then gas tank afterwards) in a large bench vise, and use a wide, flat file to resurface the diaphragm surface to remove any warpage that's notorious with these models. Be sure to resurface each evenly across so they'll be perfectly flat! Or the carburetor only can be resurfaced on a wide, flat sanding belt or disc.
  5. Use a shortened hacksaw blade to carefully recut the shallow groove in the gas tank so vacuum can reach the bellow area and open the choke plate.
  6. Use a carburetor jet cleaner wire set or an oxy-acetylene welding torch tip cleaner to clear out the dried gas and/or dirt from the idle and main nozzle holes. Be careful not to enlarge the holes, or the engine will run rich on fuel!
  7. Use [150± psi] compressed air to clear the debris from the nozzle holes, entire carburetor, screens on the fuel pickup tubes and the gas tank.
  8. Reinstall the fuel pickup tubes in the carburetor with a 3/8" and 9/16" 6-point socket. Be careful not to twist them off in the carburetor!
  9. When reinstalling the carburetor with the diaphragm on the tank, make sure the fuel pump flapper valves are properly in place, then start the mounting screws in the threads.
  10. Insert the choke rod in the choke shaft and flip the choke plate over of normal operation. This preloads the bellow in the diaphragm and allows the choke to open and close easier.
  11. Tighten the mounting screws, reinstall the choke rod cover with a new gasket and that's it!

How to Repair the Pulsa-Jet Carburetor on a Vertical or Horizontal Shaft 5hp Briggs & Stratton Flathead Engine -

If a 5hp B&S engine has excellent spark and adequate compression, but doesn't run right, then the problem is obviously in the carburetor. To fix the problem...

  1. Remove the carburetor from the engine and gas tank, completely disassemble, and soak the carburetor body and metal parts in Berryman® Chem-Dip® Carburetor and Parts Cleaner (available at most auto parts supply stores) to dissolve or loosen any dried gas deposits, crud and debris.
  2. Use a carburetor jet cleaner wire set or an oxy-acetylene welding torch tip cleaner to clear out the dried gas and/or dirt from the idle and main nozzle holes. Be careful not to enlarge the holes, or the engine will run rich on fuel!
  3. Use [150± psi] compressed air to clear the debris from the nozzle holes, entire carburetor and gas tank.
  4. Clean the screens on the pickup tubes.
  5. When the carburetor-to-block mounting screws are tightened for the first time, this causes the carburetor mounting flange to warp, which causes a vacuum leak. To fix this, resurface the flange with a large flat file or on a flat sanding disc until it's be perfectly flat. (I use the side of the cutting wheel on my 14" chop saw. Works great! Be sure to use eye protection!)
  6. Again, when the fuel pump cover mounting screws are tightened for the first time, this causes the cover to warp, which causes a vacuum leak, and the pump will not produce full flow and pressure to the reservoir bowl. To fix this, resurface the cover with a large flat file or on a sanding disc (be careful!) until it's perfectly flat. (I use the side of the cutting wheel on my 14" chop saw. Works great! Extreme care is recommended and be sure to use eye protection!)
  7. Install a new fuel pump diaphragm, carburetor-to-tank gasket and carburetor-to-block gasket, set the fuel mixture adjustment screw about 1-½ turns out, and make the final adjustment after the engine runs.
  8. If the throttle shaft needs to be removed for whatever reason, first pull the sheet metal spiral from the throttle bore with long/needle-nose Vise-Grips or large pliers. Then access to the throttle plate retaining screw can be gained with a long slender screwdriver. Repair as needed.
  9. Your engine should run like new afterwards!


How to clean the main jet in a 16hp/18hp flathead opposed twin cylinder Briggs & Stratton engine -

The main jet is located in the float bowl of the carburetor. To access and clean it...

  1. If equipped, remove the hood of the tractor (they're easy to remove).
  2. Remove the air filter housing assembly. Be careful not to drop the screws down inside the carburetor!
  3. Remove the choke cable from the carburetor.
  4. Remove the top of the carburetor.
  5. Remove the hex plug on the side of the carburetor.
  6. Use a carburetor jet cleaner wire set or an oxy-acetylene welding torch tip cleaner to clean out the hole in the main jet. The hole in the main jet is accessed through where the hex plug is. Be careful not to enlarge the hole in the main jet, or the engine will run rich on fuel!
  7. Use [150± psi] compressed air to clear out the hole in the main jet and debris from the float bowl area.
  8. Reinstall everything in reverse order of removal.

Your engine should rev up without using the choke afterwards! This may have to be done every few years because these type of carburetors are notorious for having tiny particles of dirt that passes through the fuel filter settle at the bottom of the float bowl. The main jet is real close to the bottom of the float bowl too, which allows dirt to clog it over time.


How To Clean the Inside of A Heavily Rusted or Dirty Gas Tank -

To clean an internally rusty or dirty gas tank, put some small driveway gravel in the tank with water, seal the fuel outlet fitting and gas cap vent holes (make sure the gas cap has a good seal), then literally and vigorously shake the heck out of it! Or for less tiresome labor, put the gravel and water in the tank, seal it up, securely tie a blanket around it and then put it in a clothes dryer. Set the dryer on the cold or "No Heat" setting, and let it agitate for a couple of hours. When the water is drained and majority of the gravel removed, use a garden water hose to thoroughly clean out inside the tank. It should look new inside. If there's still some rust or dirt in it, repeat the process until all the rust or dirt is broken loose. And despite of what you've probably heard, putting sugar in a gas tank will NOT ruin the engine! Read about it here: snopes.com: Sugar in the Gas Tank.


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