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Information About Tractor Pulling Tires and How to Widen Steel Wheels

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How to Widen OEM Steel Wheels How to Change a Tire on a Wheel How to Patch a Pin Hole in an Inner Tube


A-1 Miller's Steel Wheel Widening Service for Garden Pulling Tractors, Small Wheel Mini-Rods and Mini Pulling Trucks! (Posted 7/13/22)


The Differences Between Turf and Lug Tread Tires:

TURF Tread Tires by Carlisle TURF tread tires are typically found on most common riding mowers and lawn and garden tractors (mainly grass cutting equipment). Turf tread doesn't provide good traction on clay/dirt for pulling heavy loads, but it's easy on grass.

LUG Tread Tires by Carlisle LUG tread tires are the traditional farm tractor or agricultural type of tread with angled and protruding bars. Lug tread provides superior traction on clay/dirt for pulling heavy loads, but it'll tear up grass.

The rule of thumb for ALL competition pulling tractors is to get the front end as low as possible for better weight distribution and leverage. By doing this, the rear of the tractor and hitch is "raised up," and when the weight box on the sled starts to place pressure on the hitch, this will make it harder to raise the front end, causing the rear tires to bite or dig in more. Also, the front tires should be smaller (shorter in height) because all they do is support the front end and steer the tractor. And the rear tires should be bigger because they must support most of the weight of the entire tractor when pulling and provide the traction.

Always try to purchase pulling tires in a MATCHED SET!

Being rubber expands and decompresses as it cools, not all tires are manufactured to have the same exact height. Most reputable tire dealers that sell professional pulling tires offer them in pairs of the same height so the tractor will pull straight down the track. This is why it's important to try to match pulling tires that have the same height so one tire won't be slightly taller than the other. The most accurate way to know the height of each tire is to mount them on the same width wheel with about 10 psi of air pressure, then use a tape measure to measure the circumference at the center of the tread, and write the height in the tire. The circumference of each tire can vary when not mounted and properly inflated. Because when tires are stored stacked on one another or side by side on a rack, the circumference can't be accurately measured (when it isn't mounted and properly inflated).

If you plan to use Carlisle's 23-8.50x12 or 23-10.50x12 tires for competition pulling, you really need a set of the 4-ply tires to be competitive. Avoid using 2-ply lug tires for competition pulling! The lugs on 2-ply tires will bend back when the tires dig in the dirt, causing the tires to lose valuable traction, and being 4-ply tires are "firmer," the lugs on 4-ply tires will stay rigid when the tires dig in the dirt. The 4 ply tires stiffens the entire tire, including the lugs. 6- or even 8-ply tires works even better for pulling! And always match the wheels to the size (width) of the tire! For example: for 8-1/2" wide wheels, it's best to use 23-8.50x12 tires. The middle number in the tire size represents the width of the sidewall bulge when the tire is fully inflated and mounted on the proper width wheel.

And if you're running a set of new 26-12.00x12 Carlisle tires, well, these tires can pull with the best of them when the lugs are professionally "double-cut." Cut or angled lugs act like a wedge that digs in and grip the dirt better to pull the vehicle further. To double-cut the lugs for more traction, first cut the backside of the lugs so they'll be at a 45º angle, more or less (slope them back). If a 45º angle don't look quite right, sharpen the lugs at a 30º angle, more or less. Then cut a wedge between the lugs (the flat part) about 1/4" deep so this area will grip the dirt, too. By the way - the tire on the above right È, I bought them new in 1989, used in about 10 pulls per year on a 12hp Hot Stock tractor, and they have been sharpened only three times.

FYI - The 4.10/3.50-4 front tires is the proportional size to the 23-10.50x12 rear tires. The 4.10/3.50-6, 13-5.00-6 or 3.50x6 (Tri-Rib) front tires is the proportional size to the 26-12.00x12 rear tires. And the 3.50x8 (Tri-Rib) front tires looks better on a "big wheel" mini-rod competition pulling tractor.


If you're wondering how to cut, sharpen or reshape tire lugs, personally, we use a 4" handheld angle grinder with a metal tread cutting disc to cut or reshape our tire lugs. Tread cutting or grinding makes a big mess, so you may want to do outside your shop. You can also use an electric wood planer to cut the lugs. Electric wood planers works great and they make little smoke.


"Professional" VS "Non-Professional" Pulling Tires -

Certain pulling club's sanctioning rules state that "no professional pulling tires shall be used in a stock class," Ever wondered what the difference between a "professional" and "non-professional" pulling tire is? Well, professional pulling tires come from the factory with molded/sharpened lugs. They're used mainly on the higher horsepower tractors for better traction. And non-professional pulling tires have squared/unsharpened lugs. They're used mainly on stock competition pulling tractors (when rules require them), probably for economical reasons.

Non-Professional pulling tires are: Carlisle Super Lug (no longer in production), Carlisle Tru Power, Duro HF255, Firestone Flotation 23 (no longer available), McCreary Traxion, etc. Mostly in the 26-12.00x12 size, but some clubs/associations require the 23-10.50x12 size tires in a certain class. (23" overall height, 10.50" sidewall width, and 12" rim diameter.)

Professional pulling tires are: Mayhill Giant Puller (formally Pioneer and Dick Cepek), LawnTec, Nichols Pulling Edge and Vogel's VM. Mostly in the 26-12.00x12 size.

And when it comes to "hardening the tread," most new tires come with soft rubber on the outer edge of the tread. As the thread wears, the rubber gets harder further down into the tread. All tires are like this, even automotive tires. For a pulling tire to grip the dirt better and to prevent the lugs from "bending or laying back" when under pressure, the process of hardening the tread is to draw the oil from the rubber so the outer part of the tread will be harder. And the older a pulling tire gets, the better edge it will hold because the oil dries out and the rubber gets hard.


Adjust or Set the Air Pressure According to Track Conditions for Best Traction!

Adjust Air Pressure for Best Traction! When inflating your [rear] tires, add air pressure so that the entire width of the tread will lay flat and evenly on the ground. Too little pressure will allow the outside edges of the tread to make most contact with the ground resulting in poor traction, plus the tire will be shortened in overall height. The opposite will happen with too much pressure. With too little pressure, the hitch height will also be lowered when the weight of the sled comes up on the tractor while the tractor is pulling down the track.

As tire pressure varies from one tire manufacturer to another, and depending on the width of the wheels that's being used, it seems that Carlisle tires seems to work best with about 10 p.s.i. Pioneer (formerly Dick Cepek) seems to work best with 4-6 p.s.i., when mounted on 12"-13" wide wheels. But use your own judgment when inflating tires! Actually, this is how to tell if the pressure is right: on a hard, dry track, immediately after making a pull, look at the tread for uneven scraping before moving the tractor away from the sled (as this will destroy any evidence on the tread). If there's a lot of scraping in the center of the tread, let some air out of the tires.

If a tire slips on the rim when pulling due to running low air pressure, then the wheel needs to be screwed to the tire. Although RTV silicone adhesive can be used, the best way to prevent tire/rim slippage is to install tire screws. Tire screws are very short and self-tapping. Install 6 screws per wheel equally spaced apart only on one side of each wheel. If using an inner tube, and if the wheel slips on the tire, without tire screws, the slippage could rip off the valve stem and ruin the tube. Tire screws can be acquired at a local auto parts store or off of eBay.

Pulling tire sizes are determined by the overall height, maximum width (including the side wall bulge) and the inside diameter. For example, 26-12.00x12 size represents that the tire is 26" tall (when fully inflated), has an overall width of 12" (bulge of sidewalls) and mounts on a 12" diameter wheel. These tires originally mount on 10.5" wide wheels, but for pulling purposes, it's best to mount them on 12" or 13" (which is better) wide wheels so the tread will lay flat. And mount 23-10.50x12 tires on 11" wide wheels so the tread will have better ground contact.

Determining Correct Wheel Width As far as wheel width is concerned, the correct width for most 26x12.00-12 pulling tires is 13" (when measured inside the wheel rims - see drawing). Actually, the correct wheel width for any pulling tire should be equal to or slightly more than the middle number of the tire size (maximum side wall bulge). This allows all of the tread to lay flat on the ground when the tire is inflated to about 10 p.s.i. air pressure. If a wheel is too narrow, the center of the tread will make most contact with the ground. Air pressure can be reduced with narrow wheels for improved ground contact, but this will cause the circumference of the tires to become smaller and it'll also cause the hitch to lower when the sled's weight is on the tractor, losing valuable ground speed, traction and proper weight transfer.

If a pulling club's rules require that 23-10.50x12 lug tires to be used, then these tires can be mounted on 12" wide wheels. I've seen this done many times on competition pulling tractors with great results. The wider wheels will allow the tire tread to lay flatter for better traction, but it'll also shorten the overall tire height slightly which will reduce the tractor's ground speed. Therefore, to regain the ground speed, if it's a Cub Cadet garden tractor, perhaps installing 10% overdrive gears should do the trick. Also, 23-10.50x12 inner tubes may need to be installed to get the tire(s) to take air due to the wider wheels and narrow tires.


To determine the bolt pattern of a wheel (or mounting flange), measure from the outer edge of one bolt hole to the center of another that's farthest away. Most 5-hole rear garden tractor wheels have a bolt pattern (circle diameter) of 4-1/2". This is the same bolt pattern used on most early domestic (American made) Ford (car wheels), domestic (American made) Chrysler, Dodge, Plymouth (cars and light trucks) and most 5-hole utility trailer wheels. For garden tractors, virtually any 12" trailer wheel can be widened to whatever width it needs to be to match the tire to be mounted on it.

Adapting Wheels for Use with a Different Axle Flange Bolt Pattern -

When adapting Douglas or Real Racing aluminum wheels or ordinary steel garden tractor wheels to an axle flange with a different bolt pattern, new holes will need to be drilled in the flanges. For precision accuracy and so the wheels will not move "up and down" when rotating, the holes in the flanges must be drilled in a super spacer that's fastened on the table of a milling machine. The bolt pattern for most garden tractor wheels is 4.500". This means that the center of the super spacer needs to be moved 2.250" offset. Then each hole will need to be drilled precisely in five positions, starting at 0°, then at 72°, 144°, 216° and finally at 288°. If the holes are not drilled this way, the wheels will not be centered with the axles. Automotive wheels can be adapted to another vehicle using this method too, as long as the flange is big enough to accept a larger bolt pattern. IE: Using Chevy car wheels on a Ford 9" truck rear end.

Using Garden Tractor Wheels on a Small Wheel (26-12.00x12) Mini-Rod with an Automotive Rear End and Axles -

All 12" wheels, rather for a garden tractor or utility trailer, come with a 4.5 x 5 bolt pattern (4-1/2" spacing with 5 holes). An early model 8" or 9" Ford car axle flange will work with 12" garden tractor wheels because they have the same bolt pattern. But to use a Ford truck or GM car or truck axle with 12" garden tractor wheels, the centers will need to be cut out of each wheel, and then true-up and weld-in the automotive centers in the 12" wheels. Make sure the offset back-spacing is set correctly, too. Go here: Wheel Bolt Pattern Cross Reference Database and Conversion Guide. To find a set of wheels with the bolt pattern that's needed, try a local automotive salvage yard, search eBay or Craigslist.


Remember - when choosing or widening a set of rear wheels, buy them or have them made so they'll set as close as possible to the tractor frame. This will allow for a narrow wheel base width on the rear because it's hard to guide a tractor with one's body weight when the rear wheels set out a lot. The reason for this is if a tractor starts heading toward the boundary line, one would need to shift their body weight or lean less with [rear] tires that set inward or closer together. Narrowing of the fenders may need to be done in order to position the wheels close as possible to the frame. That way, the operator can lean less. Move and reweld the centers in steel wheels if necessary to accomplish this.

To move or relocate the centers in steel wheels...

  1. Drill out the spot welds with a 3/4" drill bit.
  2. Use a big hammer to knock the centers loose
  3. Relocate the centers in the wheel so they'll have the proper offset.
  4. Align the wheel/center in a large metal lathe or on the tractor axle so they won't wobble when mounted on the tractor. IMPORTANT: If you don't feel comfortable using a metal lathe, please consult a professional and experienced machinist with a lathe.
  5. Tack-weld the centers in, check for run-out (wobble), correct if necessary, then weld the centers solid.
  6. Finally, weld in some 3/4" diameter x 1/8" thickness steel discs to plug the 3/4" drilled holes.
  7. Click or tap here to learn more about how to widen steel wheels. (YouTube videos)


What does "offset" of the wheel mean?

The offset of a wheel is where the center section is positioned in the wheel. If a 12" diameter x 12" wide wheel have a 4" x 8" offset, this means that the center is positioned or measured 4" from the backside and 8" from the outer side. This particular offset positions the wheels outward from the tractor frame, for a wider track width, and used with external/axle disc brakes. But the 6" x 6" wheels are centered and not offset. The center section is positioned or measured 6" from the backside and 6" from the outer side. This positions the wheels closer to the frame of the tractor for a narrow and track width, and can be used with an internal brake (IH Cub Cadet garden tractor).


Using Aluminum Wheels On A Cub Cadet Garden Tractor That's Equipped With External Brakes -

The deep or small diameter drop-center section in the older Douglas aluminum wheels will not clear the external/axle brakes on Cub Cadet garden tractors. If you're a weight-conscience puller, use steel, aluminum or hard solid plastic wheel spacers that's 5/16" thickness to provide clearance for the external/axle brakes, tractor frame and/or fenders. Drill holes in each spacer for the wheel studs and use longer (and hardened) bolts as studs or threaded rods (Allthread) to mount the wheels. But the new style Douglas wheels with the larger diameter drop-center section will allow adequate clearance for Cub Cadet garden tractors with external/axle brakes without the need for wheel spacers. And if you are concerned about the rotating mass weight of using STEEL wheel spacers, the diameter of the spacers are so small and close to the center of the wheel, they will not effect the centrifugal force or spinning weight, which slow down high speed tires. It's not the same as using large diameter wheel weights.

Inner TubeIMPORTANT! If you're using the older Douglas 6" x 6" centered or 4" x 8" offset aluminum wheels with the deep or small diameter drop-center section, be leery about using [26-12.00x12] inner tubes with them. It'll be better to run the tires tubeless with silicone tire sealant applied around the rims and on the tire beads. Because with tubes, the deep, drop-center section could stretch the tube a little too much and cause it to eventually blow out. But if you're using the newer style Douglas aluminum wheels with a larger diameter drop-center, then it should be fine with inner tubes.


How to Widen OEM Steel Wheels | By the way - the actual width of ALL wheels is measured from inside rim to rim, and NOT the outside of the rims. See the photo to the right for a better understanding. Top of Page

When a factory wheel is widened to accept a wider tire, the process involves cutting the wheels in half parallel to the drop-center and then welding in a piece of rolled flat steel between the two halves. If you have a set of 5" wide wheels (measured on the inside lip of the rim), then 8" wide of rolled metal will need to be added in the wheels to make them 13" wide. To do this, you will need to...

  1. Place a mark on the drop-center section where the wheels need to be cut. Most importantly, identify the two halves of each wheel so they will be put back together or matched without getting them mixed up. If this isn't done, after widening, one wheel could be wider than the other and/or the offset of one wheel may be different than the other when the job is done.
  2. To cut the wheels in half or in two, securely fasten the outside edge of the rim in a large metal lathe with a 3-jaw chuck with a minimum 14" swing to get a true cut with no wobble. IMPORTANT - Make sure the wheels won't slip and "pop out" of the chuck jaws when cutting them in half! Or better yet, a [broken/twisted off] OEM Cub Cadet garden tractor axle that's not bent can be used as a spindle in the lathe to get a true cut with no wobble. The wheels can be cut from the inside or from the outside. IMPORTANT: If you're inexperienced and don't feel comfortable using a large metal lathe yourself (these can be very dangerous in the wrong hands), then consult a professional and experienced machinist with a large lathe. If a large lathe isn't available, each wheel can be fastened to the rear axle of a garden tractor with the rear end blocked up, and then each wheel can be slowly rotated by hand while using a plasma cutter to cut/separate the wheel(s) into two halves. Make sure the tractor is stationary and the tip of the plasma cutter is positioned/mounted rigid in alignment with the drop-center of the wheel, or the cut could be crooked, zig-zag or wobbly. FYI - Plasma cutters cut faster and more precisely with a thinner kerf (slit) and with less slag than cutting with an oxy-acetylene torch. IMPORTANT: If you're inexperienced and don't feel comfortable using a plasma cutter yourself, then consult a professional and experienced welder/metal fabricator with a plasma cutter.
  3. Acquire 3/32" or 13 gauge (.094") thickness x 33-3/8" length of flat steel, one for each wheel. As for the width of the flat steel, for 23-10.50x12 tires, for competition pulling and for a "flatter" tread contact with the ground (at 10 P.S.I.), it's best to widen the wheels to 11" (measured inside rim to rim). And for 26-12.00x12 tires, for competition pulling and for a "flatter" tread contact with the ground (at 10 P.S.I.), it's best to widen the wheels to 13" (measured inside rim to rim). Because OEM 12" steel garden tractor wheels come in various widths, to figure the width of the flat steel for a wheel to be widened, if the wheel is originally 5" wide (again, measured inside rim to rim), to make it 13" wide, a piece of [3/32" thickness x 33-3/8" length] flat steel will need to be 8" wide (5" + 8" = 13"). If the wheel is originally 8-1/2" wide, the flat steel will need to be 4-1/2" wide (4-1/2" + 8-1/2" =13"), etc.

How to Weld the Flat Steel to the Drop-Center Section of the Wheel Halves:

  1. Large Slip RollerUse a large "slip roll" to curve or "curl" the flat steel until it's the same diameter as the drop-center section of the wheel.
  2. Tack-weld one half of the wheel to a steel table top with the drop-center section facing upward.
  3. Acquire a sturdy nylon strap or some type of strong band larger in diameter than the drop-center of the wheel to bring the ends of the curled steel together.
  4. Align and tack-weld the curled steel to the wheel half. Then slowly work around the wheel until the entire length of curled steel is securely tack-welded to the wheel half.
  5. Place the matching half of the wheel on top of the curled steel/drop-center section and tack-weld it until it's secured to the wheel.
  6. Now chuck each wheel in the lathe or on the rear of a garden tractor (with axles that's not bent), and spin them by hand to see if they turn true with very little wobble. If they do turn true with very little wobble, securely weld the entire circumference of the curled steel (new added drop center) to both wheel halves. IMPORTANT: If you don't feel comfortable using a metal lathe, please consult a professional and experienced machinist with a lathe.

If inner tubes are going to be used (which is highly recommended for welded-together wheels), grind the bead of weld smooth. But if they're going to be tubeless, grind off the "high spots" in the weld so the bead of the tire won't get damaged when mounting the tire on the wheel. NOTE: It's best to use inner tubes with welded-together wheels. Because if it's not a superior welding job, air can seep out through the bead of weld. And as with any tubeless tire, it's best to sand smooth the inside rims of the wheel, paint the inside for lasting protection and then apply "tire bead sealant" or silicone sealant on the inside of the rims to prevent air leakage. If the tire slowly looses air over time, try some SLIME Flat Tire Repair. This stuff works great!


How to Change a Tire on a Wheel | Top of Page

How to Manually Dismount a Tire off the Wheel, the Old-Fashioned Way -

DISCLAIMER: The below is how most older automotive service stations did it many years ago before the pneumatic tire changing machine was invented. It's the old-fashioned manual way to mount and dismount tires. As long as you're careful, take your time, this still works great today, especially with steel wheels. But if you don't feel comfortable pounding a hammer next to an expensive aluminum wheel, spend a few bucks and take them to a reputable automotive tire repair shop and have them mount or dismount the tires with a pneumatic tire changing machine. And if the tires are mounted tubeless, ask the tire tech person apply plenty of tire mounting lubricant/sealant on both the tire beads and wheel rims for a leakproof seal. Otherwise, it may leak and eventually go flat.

  1. Tools needed: manual bead breaker and tire changer, 3' long crowbar or pry bar, two tire irons, medium to large size hammer, valve core tool and large Vise-Grips.
  2. Remove the valve core to fully deflate the tire if it isn't already.
  3. If it's a safety rim wheel, use the manual bead breaker and tire changer to break both tire beads down from the rims.
  4. Place the tire/wheel on the floor with the valve stem facing upward. (On most non-reversed or standard-offset wheels, this will place the drop-center part of the wheel upward.) Place one foot on the sidewall (balance or brace yourself), then push down with the heel of your other foot from inside the wheel until the bead of the tire is in the drop-center part of the wheel and at the same time, wedge one of the tire irons under the bead to pry one half of the tire off the wheel. May have to use the hammer to drive the tire iron under the bead. Use the tire irons to pry the bead to the outside of the rim until one side of the tire is on the outside of the wheel. Pry around the wheel until the entire one half of the tire is off the wheel.
  5. Stand the tire and wheel up (with the tread on the floor), position the tire between you and the wheel, with the wheel protruding outward.
  6. Place the flat end of the crowbar or pry bar on the inside of the rim that's closest to you, then push down until the sidewall is fully collapsed (use some muscle). This helps to remove the tire from the wheel while performing the next step.
  7. Now use the hammer to pound against the bead on each side of the tire (be careful not to hit the rim). The wheel should slip from the tire with each hit. Work your way down the bead on each side until the wheel falls to the floor. Move any air hoses, electrical cords, etc., out of the way of the falling wheel because the weight of the wheel (edge of rim) could damage anything in the way.

How to Manually Mount a Tire on the Wheel, the Old-Fashioned Way -

  1. First, make sure the floor you'll be working on, the tire, wheel and your shoes are absolutely clean!
  2. Install the valve core or a new valve stem in the wheel, and place the wheel flat on the floor with the valve stem facing upward. (On most wheels, this will place the drop-center part of the wheel upward.)
  3. Apply tire mounting lubricant/sealant (motor oil or automotive grease will also work) on the entire bead of the tire and circumference of the rim. Do not use soap with added water to seal or reseal tubeless tires because the water content will cause the inside rim to rust.
  4. Place the tire on the wheel. (If it's a pulling/lug tire, make sure the tread is facing the right direction! Or if it's a white wall tire or tire with raised white letters, make sure it's installed on the wheel according to the owner's preference.)
  5. Stand on the tire (balance or brace yourself) and place one foot inside the lower bead until it hangs over the rim. Place your other foot on the sidewall to apply pressure (again, balance or brace yourself), then use the hammer between your legs to pound against the bead, and cautiously work around the wheel until the bead is completely inside the rim. Be careful not to damage (split) the bead! May have to use a flat tire iron to help the bead go in the rim easier. Large Vise-Grips clamped on the rim helps secure the bead under the edge of the rim until most of the bead is pounded in place under the rim.
  6. Inflate the tire to proper specs. Check for air leaks around the bead with soapy water. Bubbles will form if there's a leak. NOTE: If a lawn and garden or non-highway use tire leaks air through small cracks/splits on the sidewalls, or if a tire leaks air around the bead/rim due to a damaged bead or rust-pitted rim, but the tire has good tread, an inner tube can be installed and the tire should last a long time. Or if the tire slowly looses air over time, instead of an inner tube, try some SLIME Flat Tire Repair. This stuff works great!

Use a small manual bead breaker tool to break the bead seal from the wheel. This tool is designed for go-kart tires, but can also be used for the front tires/wheels on riding mowers, lawn & garden tractors, garden tractors, ATVs or UTVs. This portable tool can be used on a workbench or work table. The tire will need to be removed from the wheel in a separate process.

And use a bigger manual bead breaker and tire changer to remove the tire from the wheel and change tires on ATVs, UTVs, rear garden tractors, automobiles and light trucks. For stability of this tool, fasten it stationary to a concrete floor or on a wide, heavy steel plate with hardened bolts/studs. YouTube videos: How to Use the Harbor Freight Tire Changer. Here's another useful video: Easy and safe way to break a tire bead. Take advantage of Harbor Freight's Money Saving Coupons, Coupon Codes, and Promo Codes!


How to Patch a Pin Hole in an Inner Tube | Top of Page

Inner TubePurchase an inner tube patch kit. Before you smear the sealant on the tube, be sure to thoroughly clean the patch area first with brake cleaner or cleaning solvent, and if the sealant requires that it be lit with a match, let it burn for a few seconds, blow it out and then apply the patch while the tube is hot. Use the roller supplied with the kit to press/secure the patch in place. This is called hot patching. It secures and seals the patch better than cold patching. Go here for more information: inner tube hot patch kit. But if the inner tube is old and has dry-rotted cracks/tears, then it will need to be replaced with a new tube.

FYI - When sharpening the tread on a pulling tire, sometimes the grinding disc will cut through the cords of the tire, creating a hole in the tread area of the tire. When this happens, all hope for the [expensive] tire is not lost. Simply have an automotive tire repair shop install a boot, which is a large, thick patch, over the cut place on the inside of the tire and then install an inner tube in the tire. The purpose of "boot repair" is to fix a tear in the tread.


By the way - most people call wheels "rims." This is wrong! A "rim" is the outer edge of a wheel that holds the tire bead in place. And a "wheel" is the whole thing, including the rim and the center section or flange.

Webster's dictionary defines the word Rim as:
Rim (noun)
[Middle English, from Old English rima; akin to Old Norse rimi strip of land] First appeared 13th Century
1: the outer often curved or circular edge or border of something
2: the outer part of a wheel joined to the hub usually by spokes
3: a removable outer metal band on an automobile wheel to which the tire is attached.

Also see: Rim (wheel) (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)


Suppliers of quality 12" diameter x 12" wide aluminum garden pulling tractor wheels are: Douglas Wheels, Vogel's VM (Vogel Manufacturing Wheels) (both made in China) and Keizer Wheels (made in USA). Here's the differences and similarities between Douglas and VM wheels...

  • VM is priced less than Douglas.
  • Douglas and VM have the same offsets and look similar.
  • VM have slightly thicker metal than Douglas.
  • Douglas weighs about 5 lbs. and VM weighs about 6-1/2 lbs.
  • Douglas and VM have the same diameter mounting holes (7/16").
  • VM have a more protruding/raised rim bead lock to seal the tire better than Douglas.

To make it easier to mount wheels on the rear of a garden tractor, there are three ways to install studs in the axle flanges:

Only on tractors with an internal brake:

Only on tractors with external disc brakes:

By installing studs to mount the wheels, ordinary, chrome-plated or stainless steel tapered-seat automotive lug nuts can be used to secure the wheels. To use lug nuts with steel garden tractor wheels, drill the mounting holes to 21/32" diameter, to make up the difference because of the larger taper that's on the automotive lug nuts. Any hardware store should carry a 21/32" drill bit. No other size bit will allow the lug nuts to seat properly, keep them tight and keep the wheel centered. But for aluminum wheels that have 1/2" mounting holes, drill the holes in the axle flanges larger and install a set of 1/2-20 (fine thread) bolts or studs and matching lug nuts to keep the wheels centered with the axles.


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Heavy Duty Flanged Oil-Impregnated Metal Graphite Wheel Bushings. Fits Cub Cadet garden tractors models 70, 71, 72, 73, 86, 100, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 147, 149, 169, 800, 1000, 1100, 1200, 1250, 1300, 1405 and 1650 with serial number 632501 and below. Can also be used on other various makes and models of lawn and garden tractors and small low speed motorized vehicles with 3/4" spindle shafts and 1-3/8" I.D. wheel hubs. Dimensions: 3/4" I.D. (19mm) x 1-3/8" O.D. (35mm) x 9/16" overall width (1/2" fits inside wheel hub) x 1-1/2" O.D. flange. Will hold up to a lot of weight and rough abuse. Oil impregnated means the hardened metal is porous to absorb oil and grease so it will last longer. For preventive maintenance, lubricate these parts through Zerk grease fitting with an automotive grease gun once a year. If there is no grease fitting in the wheel hub, then one should be installed. A-1 Miller part # 09-3305-3/4. Replaces Cub Cadet part # IH-384881-R94. $24.00 per set of 4 bushings, plus shipping & handling.


Heavy Duty Flanged Oil-Impregnated Metal Graphite Wheel Bushings. Fits IH Cub Cadet "Original" garden tractor with 7/8" spindle shafts and 1-3/8" I.D. wheel hubs. Dimensions: 7/8" I.D. x 1-3/8" O.D. x 9/16" overall width (1/2" fits inside wheel hub) x 1-1/2" O.D. flange. Will hold up to a lot of weight and rough abuse. Oil impregnated means the hardened metal is porous to absorb oil and grease so it will last longer. Also, the oil acts as a cushion between the bearing and shaft, adding resistance to wear. For preventive maintenance, lubricate these parts through Zerk grease fitting with an automotive grease gun once a year. If there is no grease fitting in the wheel hub, then one should be installed. Sealed ball wheel bearings are not available for the Cub Cadet "Original" garden tractor. Modified A-1 Miller part # 09-3305-7/8. Replaces discontinued Cub Cadet part # IH-376188-R1. $44.00 per set of 4 bushings, plus shipping & handling.


Heavy Duty Flanged Oil-Impregnated Metal Graphite Wheel Bushings. Fits Cub Cadet garden tractors with Douglas front aluminum wheels and small low speed motorized vehicles with 1" spindle shafts and 1-3/8" I.D. wheel hubs. Dimensions: 1" I.D. x 1-3/8" O.D. x 9/16" overall width (1/2" fits inside wheel hub) x 1-1/2" O.D. flange. Will hold up to a lot of weight and rough abuse. Oil impregnated means the hardened metal is porous to absorb oil and grease so it will last longer. Also, the oil acts as a cushion between the bearing and shaft, adding resistance to wear. For preventive maintenance, lubricate these parts through Zerk grease fitting with an automotive grease gun once a year. If there is no grease fitting in the wheel hub, then one should be installed. If there is no grease fitting in the wheel hub, then one should be installed. Modified A-1 Miller part # 09-3305-1. Irrelevant Cub Cadet part number. $44.00 per set of 4 bushings, plus shipping & handling.


Extreme Duty Flanged Sealed Wheel Bearings. Fits Cub Cadet garden tractors models 70, 71, 72, 73, 86, 100, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 147, 149, 169, 800, 1000, 1100, 1200, 1250, 1300, 1405 and 1650 with serial number 632501 and below. Can also be used on various other makes and models of lawn and garden tractors, go-karts and small motorized vehicles with 3/4" spindle shafts and 1-3/8" I.D. wheel hubs. Dimensions: 3/4" I.D. (19mm) x 1-3/8" O.D. (35mm) x 1/2" width (3/8" fits inside wheel hub) x 1-1/2" O.D. flange.

  • High quality aftermarket. These have hardened, heated-treated steel races and balls, sealed on both sides and pre-packed with grease for longer wear. Will hold up to a lot of weight and rough abuse. These are NOT the low quality flanged bearing that's available at most hardware stores. Replaces Cub Cadet part # IH-384881-R94. $8.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Cub Cadet part # IH-384881-R94. $17.10 each, plus shipping & handling.


Extreme Duty Flanged Sealed Wheel Bearings. Fits Cub Cadet garden tractor models 482, 580, 582, 680, 682, 782, 782D, 784, 882, 1000, 1050, 1100, 1200, 1204, 1210, 1211, 1250, 1282, 1450, 1512, 1604, 1606, 1650, 1710, 1711, 1712, 1806, 1810, 1811, 1812 with serial # 632502 and above. Also fits Cub Cadet garden tractor models GT2000, GT2042, GT2050, GT2100, GT2148, GTX2154 and GTX2154LE. Can also be used on various other makes and models of garden tractors, go-karts, mini-rod pulling vehicles and small motorized vehicles with 1" spindle shafts and 2" I.D. wheel hubs. Dimensions: 1" I.D. (25.4mm) x 2" O.D. (50.8mm) x 9/16" overall width (1/2" fits inside wheel hub) x 2-1/8" O.D. flange.

  • High quality aftermarket. These have hardened, heated-treated steel races and balls, sealed on both sides and pre-packed with grease for longer wear. Will hold up to a lot of weight and rough abuse. $10.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Cub Cadet part # 941-3002. $23.70 each, plus shipping & handling.


NOTE: Other sizes and styles of wheel bearings and bushings are available. Please let us know what you need and we can probably get it for you at a reasonable price. Click here to contact A-1 Miller's for FREE honest and accurate technical support and/or for ordering information and payment options. Please contact A-1 Miller's if you need a part or parts, or service performed that's not listed or mentioned in this website. [Top of Page]
Zerk Grease Fittings. For preventive maintenance, if a grease fitting isn't already installed, one should be installed in [one piece] wheel hubs or outer tubing of a rotating shaft so the [unshielded] bearings/bushings or shaft will last longer when lubricated once a year with an automotive grease gun. Do not use a grease fitting on split rim wheels. Remember - the moving part will likely wear more than the stationary part. To install a grease fitting, drill a 13/64" hole, and use a 1/4-28 UNF TAPER hand tap to cut new threads for installation of the fitting. Click or tap here to learn how to professionally drill for and cut new threads. FYI - If a grease fitting needs to be used in a thin-wall steel tubing (that's too thin to cut deep enough threads into so the threads on the grease fitting will not interfere with the inner shaft) to lubricate a moving inner shaft, weld a jam nut with 1/4-28 UNF threads on the tubing, then drill a 3/16" hole nut/tubing, and install the grease fitting (with short threads) in the nut. Remember - grease fittings provide preventive maintenance when they're used regularly. Because grease cost less than any major repair of equipment. [Return to Previous Section, Paragraph or Website]
  • Short Straight fittings. Use for steering ends/joints, spindle shafts, universal joints, etc.
    • High quality aftermarket. Thread-in type. Dimensions: 1/4-28 UNF x .181" length threads x 35/64" overall height x 5/16" hex. Replaces Cub Cadet part # 937-3000. .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
    • Press-in type. OEM Cub Cadet part # 937-3000. $4.67 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Long Straight fitting. Install in front wheel hubs to lubricate bushings or bearings, etc. Dimensions: 1/4-28 UNF threads x 11/16" overall height x 5/16" hex. .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • 45º Angled Fitting. Use in hard to get places with obstacles. Dimensions of each: 1/4-28 UNF x .222" length threads x 7/8" overall height x 5/16" hex.
    • High quality aftermarket. Replaces Cub Cadet part # 737-3001. $1.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
    • OEM Cub Cadet part # 737-3001. Replaces discontinued 65º fitting, Cub Cadet part # IH-273360. $12.43 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • 90º Angled Fitting. Use in hard to get places with obstacles. Dimensions: 1/4-28 UNF x .207" length threads x 3/4" overall height x 5/16" hex. .75¢ each, plus shipping & handling. [Return to Previous Section, Paragraph or Website]
Front Steel and Aluminum Wheels listed below - (Posted 5/7/22) Click here to contact A-1 Miller's for FREE honest and accurate technical support and/or for ordering information and payment options. Please contact A-1 Miller's if you need a part or parts, or service performed that's not listed or mentioned in this website. [Top of Page]
Inner Tube Front Steel Wheels. 6" diameter x 3" rim width. Fits 3" length spindle shaft. Heavy duty. Two-piece/split rim design for easy mounting of tire; must use with inner tube. Use on general lawn and garden tractors, go-karts, small motorized vehicles, competition garden pulling tractors, etc.
  • Front Steel Wheels. Includes 3/4" I.D. heavy duty sealed ball bearings. $96.00/pair, plus shipping & handling.
  • Inner tubes w/straight stem (not angled) for wheels above. $12.00/pair, plus shipping & handling.
Inner TubeFront Aluminum "Astro" Wheels with a distinctive appearance and timeless beauty. See photo below; tires not included. Heavy duty; strong, but lightweight. 6" diameter x 3" rim width. Fits 3" length spindle shaft. Two-piece/split rim design for easy mounting of tire; must use with inner tubes. Use on general lawn and garden tractors, go-karts, small motorized vehicles, competition garden pulling tractors, etc.
  • Front Aluminum "Astro" Wheels. Includes 3/4" I.D. heavy duty sealed ball bearings. $150.00/pair, plus shipping & handling.
  • Inner tubes w/straight stem (not angled) for wheels above. $12.00/pair, plus shipping & handling.

Front Inner TubeAluminum "Spinner" Wheels with a distinctive appearance and timeless beauty. See photo below; tires not included. Heavy duty; strong, but lightweight. 8" diameter x 3" rim width. Fits 3" length spindle shaft. Two-piece/split rim design for easy mounting of tire; must use with inner tube. Use on general lawn and garden tractors, go-karts, small motorized vehicles, competition garden pulling tractors, etc.
  • Front Aluminum "Spinner" Wheels. Includes 3/4" I.D. heavy duty sealed ball bearings. $190.00/pair, plus shipping & handling.
  • Inner tubes w/straight stem (not angled) for wheels above. $12.00/pair, plus shipping & handling.

Heavy Duty All Plastic Wheelie Bar Wheels with smooth, rounded tread surface. Looks nice on a competition pulling tractor. Weighs less than 10 ounces each. Lighter in weight than all-aluminum wheels or steel wheels w/rubber tread, but just as strong. Dimensions: 5" overall height x 1-5/16" wide x 5/8" center hole. Our part # 11819.
  • $10.00 per pair, plus shipping & handling.
Thread-In Wheel Stud/Nut Kits for IH-built Cub Cadet garden tractors with an internal (wet) brake or external axle/disc brakes, but will work on other makes and models of garden tractors as well. Along with wheel spacers, these are required when wheels will not clear the fenders and/or brake calipers. With lug nuts (below Ê) installed, these make for much easier mounting of wheels with or without spacers on a garden tractor. Made of 125,000 PSI hardened 7/16-20 UNF (fine thread) studs and secured from the backside in the wheel flanges with jam nuts. Each set includes 10 studs and 10 jam nuts. Replaces Cub Cadet part # 710-3027. An original, ingenious and innovative concept by Brian Miller. Please do not accept advertised copycat products of this kind. (But I do appreciate them acknowledging my ingenuity and intelligence.)
    • 1-5/8" length for use with no wheel spacers. $20.00 per set of 10 studs and 10 jam nuts, plus shipping & handling.
    • 2" length for use with 5/16" wheel spacers. $22.50 per set of 10 studs and 10 jam nuts, plus shipping & handling.
    • 3-5/8" length for use with 1" wheel spacers. $25.00 per set of 10 studs and 10 jam nuts, plus shipping & handling.
    • Custom lengths available. Please specify length when ordering. $25.00 per set of 10 studs and jam nuts, plus shipping & handling.
Bolt-In Wheel Stud Kit for IH-built Cub Cadet garden tractor with an internal (wet) brake. But will work on other makes and models of garden tractors as well. 7/16-20 UNF (fine thread) x 1-1/2" thread length. For use with no wheel spacers. These are grade 8 bolts that act as studs when installed from the backside in the flanges. Along with nice appearing automotive-style chrome-plated, plain steel or stainless steel lug nuts (listed below), these make for much easier mounting of wheels on a garden tractor. NOTE: Not for tractors with external brake disc welded to axle. An original, ingenious and innovative concept by Brian Miller.
  • $10.00 per set of 10, plus shipping & handling.
Press-In Automotive-Style Wheel Studs for MTD-built Cub Cadet 30mm Fine Spline Axles. Convert OEM Cub Cadet 7/16-14 UNC coarse thread studs to 7/16-20 UNF fine thread studs for much easier mounting of wheels on a garden tractor so nice appearing automotive-style chrome-plated, plain steel or stainless steel lug nuts (listed below) can be used. OEM MTD brake discs can be used with these studs. Made of extremely hardened steel. Install with a 1/2" impact wrench with grade 8 nut and flat washer/spacer to draw stud in flange. No drilling-out/enlarging holes in flanges required. NOTE: Aluminum flat surface wheels must have 7/16" mounting holes to keep the wheel centered with the axle. Replaces Cub Cadet part # 710-0852. An innovative concept by Brian Miller because nobody else advertise this part for a garden tractor. $20.00 per set of 10, plus shipping & handling.
Plain Steel, Stainless Steel and Chrome Lug Nuts for Factory Steel or Aluminum Rear Wheels. Along with studs (above), these make for much easier mounting of wheels on a garden tractor, and these have a nice appearance. 7/16-20 UNF thread size. Torque each nut to 50 ft. lbs. NOTE: Aluminum flat surface wheels must have 7/16" mounting holes to keep the wheel centered with the axle. And the mounting holes in factory steel wheels will need to be drilled-out/enlarged to 21/32" to allow for the taper seat lug nuts to tighten properly and keep the wheel centered with the axle.
  • Plain, Zinc-Plated Tapered Seat Lug Nuts for Factory Steel Wheels. $15.00 per set of 10, plus shipping & handling.
  • Chrome-Plated Closed-End Tapered Seat Lug Nuts for Factory Steel Wheels. $25.00 per set of 10, plus shipping & handling.
  • Stainless Steel Nuts and Flat Washers for Flat Surface Wheels. $25.00 per set of 10, plus shipping & handling.
  • Chrome-Plated Closed-End Lug Nuts and Thick Flat Washers for Flat Surface Wheels. $32.00 per set of 10, plus shipping & handling.


The Importance and Safety of Having Wheelie Bars Installed on a Competition Pulling Tractor -[Top of Page]

If a competition pulling tractor is going to run a 13" drawbar height with 26x12.00-12 tires, it must have wheelie bars properly installed, even if a club or pull site doesn't require them. Because a competition pulling tractor can flip back so quickly, without warning. The rear tires are rotating in one direction, which forces the tractor to want to rotate in the opposite direction. ("For every action, there's an equal and opposite reaction." - Newton's third law of motion.) So for safety sake, it's best to have wheelie bars installed for pulling regardless of the height of the drawbar or tire size. Wheelie bars are sometimes referred to as a "no-tip device." Wheelie bars are one of the easiest things to install on a competition pulling tractor. Only an idiot or someone with a death wish would pull a tractor without wheelie bars!

The pads or wheels for the ground contact needs to be of adequate size too, to prevent from sinking into soft earth. The pads need to be a minimum of 3" square x 1/8" thickness and wheels need to be a minimum of 4" diameter x 1" wide. Most pullers prefer to use wheels on the wheelie bars. They allow the tractor to gain an inch or two because they "roll." The pads on the other hand scrape on the ground and doesn't allow the tractor to get much further. And it's a good idea for stock tractors to run a 10" drawbar height anyway to prevent breaking a stock rear end.

For best stability of the tractor when the front end raises upward, most club's rules state that the bottom of the wheelie bar wheels or skid plates are supposed to a maximum of 5" from the ground. And the rear of the wheelie bar wheels or skid plates are supposed to be a minimum of 5" from the tread of the rear tires. Scroll down to see drawing for a better explanation. Check out this YouTube link: When it's important to have wheelie bars on a competition pulling tractor!

For safety reasons, make your wheelie bar bracket material rigid and not spring-loaded. They must be made of heavy wall (minimum 1/8" thickness) tubing and reinforced for strength. Also, bolt on the wheelie bar brackets and don't weld them to the frame. So they can be adjusted if necessary. See the photos below Ê for what typical wheelie bar brackets look or click here for a Google image search on competition pulling tractor wheelie bars.


FYI: The wheelie bar brackets shown above were fabricated by the individual who owns each tractor.

IMPORTANT! And be aware when using flat aluminum wheelie bar braces. If the tractor were to stop suddenly on the track, and the sled bumps the rear of the tractor, the braces could bend to the side from the impact. And straightening them so they'll look original again is almost impossible. Therefore, we think it's better to use 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" x 1/8" wall square tubing as wheelie bars. When the sled bumps wheelie bars made of heavy wall square tubing, the whole rear of the tractor will move sideways slightly, and the wheelie bars won't suffer any damage.

How to set the wheelie bars for proper height so the front end won't be too high or too low when the front tires comes off the ground:

  1. Install the front and rear tires that you're going to use at the pulls on the tractor.
  2. Raise the front of the tractor (using a hoist or ramps) until the bottom of the front tires are about 16" off the ground.
  3. Set the wheelie bars w/wheels or skid pads on the ground.
  4. Mark and drill holes in the frame or transaxle to fasten the wheelie bar brackets.
  5. Use 3/8" diameter grade 8 bolts to fasten the wheelie bars!


Rear Safety BumperIMPORTANT! About Rear Safety Bumpers -

When a high speed garden tractor gets going down the track really good, and all of a sudden it's engine stalls and the tractor comes to a complete stop, what's going to happen? Chances are the sled will bump the rear of the tractor. Most sled operators can't put the brakes on in time or react fast enough because this can happen so quickly. Therefore, it's a good idea to install a couple of heavy-duty rear "bumpers" mounted on or incorporated into the wheelie bar brackets located a minimum of 6" above the wheels or pads. (Most club's rules and regulations will or should specify the location.) These bumpers will keep the sled from possibly getting up on top of the rear tires, causing damage to the tractor and/or injury to the driver. And the bumpers will prevent the pull chain from getting "wrapped" around one of the rear tires should the tractor go sideways to the extreme.


IMPORTANT! Safety of Pulling -

All tractor pulling participants, despite their age, needs to be educated on safety requirements and proper operation of a competition pulling tractor. Because many of them, when the tractor they're sitting on is hooked to the sled, will rev it up and give it all it's got, and they'll do whatever it takes to win. Some even get injured by doing so. They think it's a "no-holds-barred" contest.

We've seen a few garden tractor pullers would launch the sled (not our sled) at the sting line, when all of a sudden their tractor would flip backwards and sometimes the puller will hit the back of their head dirt shield that's on the front of the skid pan because no wheelie bars were installed on their tractor. They weren't seriously injured. But it's scary to actually witness something like that in person! It's not a funny thing to happen and certainly not part of the show!

We were at a pull several years ago [with a now defunct pulling club that was based in central Missouri], when an inexperienced adult person on a stock garden tractor was pulling the sled [not our sled] down the track when all of a sudden the front of the tractor reared up and stood on end, then it caught on fire. What caused this is the tractor had 26-12.00x12 lug tires, about a 16" drawbar height and no wheelie bars. It also had a loose-fitting gas cap with a full tank of gas, which was positioned on top of the engine, and the battery, which was positioned between the gas tank and steering column, wasn't fastened down. When the tractor stood on end, the gas cap fell off, gas spilled out onto the battery and on the driver. Then the battery tipped back, shorting out the posts against the metal steering column support, which ignited the fuel. It was a horrible sight! The flames were immediately extinguished and the puller had to be air-lifted to the nearest hospital with a burn unit. He recovered from his injuries, but he now has scars on his chest and groin area to remind him of that horrible day at a tractor pull when he was just trying to have some fun with his friends. Not to mention the mental scars it left, too. An official of this particular pull should have inspected that tractor and all other tractors for safety, and not allow the puller to participate if the tractor wasn't safe or legal, or if an adjustment wasn't made.

Tell your friends and family about this story. And tell them to definitely install sturdy wheelie bars with skid plates or wheels, whether if they feel they need them or not, or if the rules require them or not. Remember - friends don't let friends pull without wheelie bars (and other safety equipment). And NEVER allow a young person to participate in a pulling event without wheelie bars (and of course, other safety equipment) properly installed and maintained.

IMPORTANT! We've been to a lot of garden tractor pulls over the years and noticed that some tractors leak fuel in places where a fuel leak shouldn't be. Therefore, we think that safety inspections needs to include checking the fuel lines for dry-rotting, cracks, fuel leaks, loose fittings, etc. (The tractors should have sturdy wheelie bars, too.) The inspectors needs to grab hold of the fuel line(s) with their hand and wiggle it around and slightly jerk on it to check for durability. This is important. Especially in a kid's class. Don't wait until an issue becomes a problem, and then turn into a catastrophe. If pullers would build their tractors right to begin with and maintain them properly, there wouldn't be any injuries, fires, or fear of a fire.


Click Here for Detailed Illustrated Plans on How to Construct a Professional Pull-Back and Self-Propelled Garden Tractor Pulling Sled (Available Soon) FYI - The self-propelled garden tractor pulling sled that I built is such an excellent design, I realized later that I made something very special when other people copied after it. - Brian Miller


To place an order, send your item(s) for repairing, and/or for customer service assistance, and FREE honest and accurate technical support, please contact: A-1 Miller's Performance Enterprises | 1501 W. Old Plank Rd. | Columbia, MO (Missouri) 65203-9136 USA. Please call in your order or send an email with a list parts you need and your contact information. Phone: 1-573-881-7229 (cell; call, text or leave voicemail), 1-573-554-9008 (land line) or use Whatsapp. Please call Monday-Friday, 9am to 5pm, Central time zone, except holidays. If no answer, please try again later. (When speaking with Brian on the phone, please be patient and understanding because I stutter.) E-mail: pullingtractor@aol.com. Payment Options. A-1 Miller's shop is open to the public Monday-Friday, 9am to 5pm, Central time zone, with an appointment on weekends, except holidays. If you're the kind of person who don't trust delivery/shipping companies (mis)handling your high-dollar and fragile merchandise, you can make the long drive to A-1 Miller's shop to personally purchase parts, or drop off and/or pick up your carburetor, clutch assembly, engine and/or parts, etc., for repairing and/or rebuilding. Or visit the address of our (old) shop mentioned above to drop off your engine, transmission, transaxle, garden tractor, small motorized vehicle, etc. We also custom build pulling tractors and other small vehicles. Please contact me before coming so I'll be at my shop waiting for your arrival. When you visit our shop, you will be dealing directly with the owner for the best customer service. Directions to our (old) shop | 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO - Google Maps or Map of 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO by MapQuest. "The road to a [trusted] friend's house (or shop) is never long." Don't sacrifice quality workmanship for distance. [Return To Previous Paragraph, Section or Website]

By the way - As business is booming, we're going to relocate our business soon at 12091 N. Rt. B, Hallsville, MO 65255 with a bigger, better, fully insulated, heated and air-conditioned building/shop (shouse) so we can provide many more high quality parts and professional services, and hire more reliable and knowledgeable help to have our customer's parts orders fulfilled sooner, parts repairs and engine rebuilds performed promptly without delay. We will also offer custom welding fabrication jobs and other custom services. We will also provide pick up and delivery service and perform professional repairs for various small engines and lawn & garden equipment! Photos of our new building/shop are posted here! 12091 N. Rt. B, Hallsville, MO 65255 - Google Maps

To place an order, please call the number below Ê or send an email with your name, complete and correct postal address and phone number and so I can figure the total with shipping cost and USPS Tracking. For payment options for parts ordered or services performed, or to make a donation to my websites, I accept cash (in person), USPS Postal Money Orders, cashier's checks, business checks, MasterCard, VISA, Discover, American Express (please add 2.5% to the total for the credit/debit card processor's surcharge), Western Union Money Transfer or MoneyGram Money Transfers. (If a part for a specific purpose is special ordered, your debit/credit card may be charged for the full amount or as a deposit right after your order is placed; please do not send your debit/credit card information in email!) Or you can pay A-1 Miller's through PayPal. (My PayPal account name is my email address. And be sure to mention in PayPal a description of what the payment is for.) If sending a money order, please include a note in the envelope with your name, complete and correct postal address, phone number and a description of what the payment is for. My mailing address and phone number are below Ê . I'll make a note of your order, and I may have to order some of the parts, which should take a few days to come in, but I will send the parts to you as soon as I have everything in stock after I receive your payment.

IMPORTANT - When sending your part(s) to A-1 Miller's for rebuilding or repair, package everything securely so the item(s) won't get damaged in shipping and please include a note in the box with your name, mailing address, phone number (in case I have any questions) and a description of what you want done. When shipping heavy parts, it's best to put a slightly smaller box inside a larger box, to double the strength and integrity of the package. Because the clumsy "gorillas" or incompetent and uncaring workers that work for certain delivery services mishandle the heavy packages and don't care. And when the work is completed, I'll either call or email you an invoice with the total including shipping and handling.

Payment Options and We Ship to Canada and Worldwide
Item(s) in a package or cushioned envelope weighing less than 1 lb. is sent by US Postal Service Airmail Letter Post for a 4-7 days delivery. Packaged item(s) weighing over 1 lb. and up to 66 lb. is sent by US Postal Service Airmail Parcel Post for a 4-10 days delivery. I cannot use the US Postal Services' Flat Rate Priority Mail envelopes and boxes to ship outside U.S. territories. Item(s) weighing over 67 lbs. or more is sent by FedEx Ground or equivalent services. We try to keep our shipping cost to customers within reason. Therefore, we don't ship our products in a fancy-looking package with our company name and/or logo on it because most customers will just toss it in the trash after they remove the contents. And being there is no USPS tracking number outside the US, all I can do is make sure I write your address correctly on the customs form and on your package.

My websites are not set up to process orders and accept payments. Therefore, to place an order with me, please call either number above or send an email with a list of parts you need, with your name, complete and correct postal mailing address and phone number. For payment options, I accept cash (in person), USPS Postal Money Orders, cashier's checks, business checks, MasterCard, VISA, Discover, American Express (please add 2.5% to the total amount for the credit/debit card processor's surcharge). If paying with a credit/debit card, please call me at either number above. Or to make a payment to me through PayPal, please click this link: https://www.paypal.com. Or use Cash App (username: pullingtractor) or Venmo (username: Pullingtractor) to make a payment to me. And be sure to mention a description of what the payment is for with your full name, postal address, phone number and email address. I also accept payments through Western Union Money Transfer or MoneyGram Money Transfers. If sending a money order or cashier's check, please include a note in the envelope with your name, complete mailing address, phone number, email address and a description of what the payment is for. I'll make a note of your order when I have all your information, and I may have to order some of the parts on your list, which should take a few days to come in, but I will send everything to you as soon as I have the parts in stock after I receive your payment.



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