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WheelsInformation About Tractor Pulling Tires and How to Widen Steel Wheels

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The Differences Between Turf and Lug Treads:

TURF Tread Tires by CarlisleTURF tread is typically found on most common riding mowers and lawn & garden tractors (mainly grass cutting equipment). Turf tread doesn't provide good traction on dirt for pulling heavy loads, but it's easy on grass. (Carlisle tires pictured.)

LUG Tread Tires by CarlisleLUG tread is the traditional farm tractor or agricultural type of tread (angled with raised bars). Lug tread provides superior traction on dirt for pulling heavy loads, but it'll tear up grass. (Carlisle tires pictured. The 26-12.00x12 Super Lugs are no longer available.)

The rule of thumb for ALL pulling tractors is to get the front end as low as possible for better weight distribution and leverage. By doing this, the rear of the tractor or hitch is "raised up," and when the weight of the sled starts to place pressure on the hitch, this will make it harder to raise the front end. Causing the rear tires to bite more. Also, the front wheels (or tires) can be smaller because all they do is support the front weight of the tractor and steer. And the rear wheels (or tires) has to be bigger because they must support most of the weight and provide the traction.

Always try to purchase pulling tires in a MATCHED SET!

Being rubber expands and decompresses as it cools, not all tires are manufactured to have the same exact height. Most reputable tire dealers that sell professional pulling tires sell them in pairs of the same height so the tractor will pull straight down the track. This is why it's important to try to match pulling tires that have the same height so one tire won't be slightly taller than the other. The most accurate way to know the height of each tire is to mount them on the same width wheel with about 10 psi of air pressure, then use a tape measure to measure the circumference at the center of the tread, and write the height in the tire. The circumference of each tire can vary when not mounted and properly inflated. Because when tires are stored stacked on one another or side by side on a rack, the circumference can't be accurately measured (when it isn't mounted and properly inflated).

If you're going to use Carlisle's 23-8.50x12 or 23-10.50x12 tires, you really need a set of 4 ply's to be competitive. Avoid using 2-ply lug tires for pulling! The lugs on 2-ply tires will bend back when the tires dig in the dirt, causing the tires to lose traction, and lugs on 4-ply tires will stay rigid when the tires dig in the dirt. The 4 ply tires stiffens the entire tire, including the lugs. 6- or even 8-ply tires works even better for pulling! And always match the wheels to the size (width) of the tire! For example: for 8-1/2" wide wheels, it's best to use 23-8.50x12 tires. The middle number in the tire size represents the width of the sidewall bulge when the tire is fully inflated and mounted on the proper width wheel.

And if you're running a set of new 26-12.00x12 Carlisle tires, well, these tires can pull with the best of them when the lugs are professionally "double-cut." Cut or angled lugs act like a wedge that digs in and grip the dirt better to pull the vehicle further. To double-cut the lugs for more traction, first cut the backside of the lugs so they'll be at a 45º angle, more or less (slope them back). If a 45º angle don't look quite right, sharpen the lugs at a 30º angle, more or less. Then cut a wedge between the lugs (the flat part) about 1/4" deep so this area will grip the dirt, too. By the way - the tire on the above right È, I bought them new in 1989, used in about 10 pulls per year on a 12hp Hot Stock tractor, and they have been sharpened only three times.

FYI - The 4.10/3.50-4 front tires is the proportional size to the 23-10.50x12 rear tires. The 4.10/3.50-6, 13-5.00-6 or 3.50x6 (Tri-Rib) front tires is the proportional size to the 26-12.00x12 rear tires. And the 3.50x8 (Tri-Rib) front tires looks better on a "big wheel" mini-rod pulling tractor.


If you're wondering how to cut, sharpen or reshape tire lugs, personally, we use a 4" handheld angle grinder with a metal tread cutting disc to cut or reshape our tire lugs. Tread cutting or grinding makes a big mess, so you may want to do outside your shop. You can also use an electric wood planer to cut the lugs. Electric wood planers works great and they make little smoke.


"Professional" VS "Non-Professional" Pulling Tires -

Some pulling club's sanctioning rules state that "no professional pulling tires shall be used in a stock class," Ever wondered what a "professional" and "non-professional" pulling tire is? Well, professional pulling tires come from the factory with molded cut lugs. They're used mainly on the higher horsepower tractors for better traction. Non-professional pulling tires have squared lugs. They're used (when rules require them) mainly on stock pulling tractors, probably for economical reasons.

Professional pulling tires are: Pioneer (formerly Dick Cepek) Giant Puller, LawnTec, Nichols Pulling Edge, Temco Pit Bull 2, and Vogel's VM.

Non-professional pulling tires are: Carlisle Super Lug (26-12.00x12 size; no longer available), Firestone Flotation 23 (no longer available), McCreary Traxion, and Titan/Carlisle Tru Power.

And when it comes to "hardening the tread," new tires come with soft rubber on the outer edge of the tread. As the thread wears, the rubber gets harder further down in the tread. All tires are like this, even automotive tires. For a pulling tire to grip the dirt better and to prevent the lugs from "laying back" when under pressure, the process of hardening the tread is to draw the oil from the rubber so the outer part of the tread will be harder. And the older a pulling tire gets, the better edge it will hold because the rubber dries out and gets hard.


Adjust or Set the Air Pressure for Best Traction!

Adjust Air Pressure for Best Traction! When inflating your [rear] tires, add air pressure so that the entire width of the tread will lay flat and evenly on the ground. Too little pressure will allow the outside edges of the tread to make most contact with the ground resulting in poor traction, plus the tire will be shortened in overall height. The opposite will happen with too much pressure. With too little pressure, the hitch height will also be lowered when the weight of the sled comes up on the tractor while the tractor is pulling down the track.

As tire pressure varies from one tire manufacturer to another, and depending on the width of the wheels that's being used, it seems that Carlisle tires seems to work best with about 10 p.s.i. Pioneer (formerly Dick Cepek) seems to work best with 4-6 p.s.i., when mounted on 12"-13" wide wheels. But use your own judgment when inflating tires! Actually, this is how to tell if the pressure is right: on a hard, dry track, immediately after making a pull, look at the tread for uneven scraping before moving the tractor away from the sled (as this will destroy any evidence on the tread). If there's a lot of scraping in the center of the tread, let some air out of the tires.

If a tire slips on the rim when pulling due to running low air pressure, then the wheel needs to be screwed to the tire. Although RTV silicone adhesive can be used, the best way to prevent tire/rim slippage is to install tire screws. Tire screws are very short and self-tapping. Install 6 screws per wheel equally spaced apart only on one side of each wheel. If using an inner tube, and if the wheel slips on the tire, without tire screws, the slippage could rip off the valve stem and ruin the tube. Tire screws can be acquired at a local auto parts store or off of eBay.

Pulling tire sizes are determined by the overall height, maximum width (including the side wall bulge) and the inside diameter. For example, 26-12.00x12 size represents that the tire is 26" tall (when fully inflated), has an overall width of 12" (bulge of sidewalls) and mounts on a 12" diameter wheel. These tires originally mount on 10.5" wide wheels, but for pulling purposes, it's best to mount them on 12" or 13" (which is better) wide wheels so the tread will lay flat. And mount 23-10.50x12 tires on 11" wide wheels so the tread will have better ground contact.

Determining Correct Wheel Width As far as wheel width is concerned, the correct width for most 26x12.00-12 pulling tires is 13" (when measured inside the bead lip - see drawing). Actually, the correct wheel width for any pulling tire should be equal to or slightly more than the middle number of the tire size (maximum side wall bulge). This allows all of the tread to lay flat on the ground when the tire is inflated to about 10 p.s.i. air pressure. If a wheel is too narrow, the center of the tread will make most contact with the ground. Air pressure can be reduced with narrow wheels for improved ground contact, but this will cause the circumference of the tires to become smaller and it'll also cause the hitch to lower when the sled's weight is on the tractor, losing valuable ground speed, traction and proper weight transfer.

If a pulling club's rules require that 23-10.50x12 [Carlisle Super Lug or Vogel] tires to be used, then these tires can be mounted on 12" wide wheels. I've seen this done many times on pulling tractors with great results. The wider wheels will allow the tire tread to lay flatter for better traction, but it'll also shorten the overall tire height slightly which will reduce the tractor's ground speed. Therefore, to regain the ground speed, if it's a Cub Cadet, perhaps installing 10% overdrive gears should do the trick. Also, 23-10.50x12 inner tubes may need to be installed to get the tire(s) to take air due to the wider wheels and narrow tires.


To determine the bolt pattern of a wheel (or mounting flange), measure from the outer edge of one bolt hole to the center of another that's farthest away.

Most rear garden tractor wheels have a 5-hole bolt pattern and a circle diameter of 4-1/2". This is the same bolt pattern used on most early domestic (American made) Ford (car wheels), domestic (American made) Chrysler, Dodge, Plymouth (cars and light trucks) and most 5-hole utility trailer wheels. The 12" trailer wheels can be widened to whatever width needs to be to match the tire to be mounted on it.

Adapting Wheels for Use with a Different Axle Flange Bolt Pattern -

When adapting Douglas or Real Racing aluminum wheels or ordinary garden tractor wheels to an axle flange with a different bolt pattern, new holes will need to be drilled in the flanges. For precision accuracy and so the wheels will not move "up and down" when rotating, the holes in the flanges must be drilled in a super spacer that's fastened on the table of a milling machine. The bolt pattern for most garden tractor wheels is 4.500". This means that the center of the super spacer needs to be moved 2.250" offset. Then each hole will need to be drilled precisely in five positions, starting at 0°, then at 72°, 144°, 216° and finally at 288°. If the holes are not drilled this way, the wheels will not be centered with the axles. Automotive wheels can be adapted to another vehicle using this method too, as long as the flange is big enough to accept a larger bolt pattern. IE: Using Chevy car wheels on a Ford 9" truck rear end.

Using Garden Tractor Wheels on a Small Wheel (26-12.00x12) Mini-Rod with an Automotive Rear End and Axles -

All 12" wheels, rather for a garden tractor or utility trailer, come with a 4.5 x 5 bolt pattern (4-1/2" spacing with 5 holes). An early model 8" or 9" Ford car axle flange will work with 12" garden tractor wheels because they have the same bolt pattern. But to use a Ford truck or GM car or truck axle with 12" garden tractor wheels, the centers will need to be cut out of each wheel, and then true-up and weld-in the automotive centers in the 12" wheels. Make sure the offset back-spacing is set correctly, too. Go here: Wheel Bolt Pattern Cross Reference Database and Conversion Guide. To find a set of wheels with the bolt pattern that's needed, try a local automotive salvage yard, search eBay or Craigslist.


Remember - when choosing or widening a set of rear wheels, buy them or have them made so they'll set as close as possible to the tractor frame. This will allow for a narrow wheel base width on the rear because it's hard to guide a tractor with one's body weight when the rear wheels set out a lot. The reason for this is if a tractor starts heading toward the boundary line, one would need to shift their body weight or lean less with [rear] tires that set inward or closer together. Narrowing of the fenders may need to be done in order to position the wheels close as possible to the frame. That way, the operator can lean less. Move and reweld the centers in steel wheels if necessary to accomplish this.

To move or relocate the centers in steel wheels...

  1. Drill out the spot welds with a 3/4" drill bit.
  2. Use a big hammer to knock the centers loose
  3. Relocate the centers in the wheel so they'll have the proper offset.
  4. Align the wheel/center in a large metal lathe or on the tractor axle so they won't wobble when mounted on the tractor.
  5. Tack-weld the centers in, check for run-out (wobble), correct if necessary, then weld the centers solid.
  6. Finally, weld in some 3/4" diameter x 1/8" thickness steel discs to plug the 3/4" drilled holes.
  7. Click here to learn more about how to widen steel wheels. (YouTube videos)


What does "offset" of the wheel mean?

The offset of a wheel is where the center section is positioned in the wheel. If a 12" diameter x 12" wide wheel has a 4" x 8" offset, this means that the center is positioned or measured 4" from the backside and 8" from the front side (where the valve stem is located on most wheels). This particular offset positions the wheels outward from the tractor frame. The 6" x 6" wheels are centered and not offset, which positions the wheels closer to the frame of the tractor.


Using Aluminum Wheels On A Cub Cadet That's Equipped With External Brakes -

Wheel spacer (to clear external brakes)The older 6" x 6" centered Douglas aluminum wheels will not clear external brakes. If you are a weight-conscience puller, use spacers that's 5/16" thickness made of either steel, aluminum or hard solid plastic to provide clearance for the external brakes and/or fenders. Drill holes in each spacer for the lug bolts and use longer (and hardened) bolts to mount the wheels. The new style Douglas wheels now have a larger center which allows their use on external disc brake Cub Cadet transaxles without the need for wheel spacers.

If you are worried about the excessive rotating mass weight of using STEEL spacers, the diameter of the spacers are so small, they won't effect the spinning weight which slow down tires. It's not like running large diameter wheel weights. If you make your own spacers, make sure they're trued up in a metal lathe. And use a Super Spacer or Indexing Fixture to accurately locate and bore the holes for the lug bolts/studs.

IMPORTANT! Inner TubeIf you're using the older Douglas aluminum wheels with the deep drop-center, be leery about using inner tubes. It'll be best to run the tires tubeless with silicone tire sealant applied around the rims and tire beads because with tubes, the deep area in the wheel could stretch the rubber a little too much and blow out the tube. But if you're using the newer style wheels with a shallow drop-center, then it should be safe to run inner tubes.


How to Widen Steel Wheels -

If you have a set of 5" wide wheels (measured on the inside lip of the rim), then 8" wide of rolled metal will need to be added in the wheels to make them 13" wide. To do this, you will need to...

  1. Place a mark on the drop-center section where the wheels need to be cut. And importantly, identify the two halves of each wheel so they will be put back together without getting them mixed up. (If this isn't done, one wheel could be wider than the other and/or the offset won't be right when the job is finished.)
  2. To cut the wheels in two, chuck them in a large metal lathe with a minimum 14" swing. A Cub Cadet axle that's not bent can be used as a spindle to get a true cut. Or chuck the edge of the rim in the lathe's 3-jaw chuck. The wheels can be cut on the inside or outside. Either way, just make sure they won't slip in the chuck when cutting them!
  3. Acquire 33-3/8" length of sheet steel, one for each wheel, approximately the same thickness as the wheels. Use either 13 gauge (.093" / 3/32" thickness) or 12 gauge (.108" / 7/64" thickness). For 23-10.50x12 tires, the wheels will need to be 11" wide (inside lip to inside lip). And for 26-12.00x12 tires, the wheels will need to be 13" wide (inside lip to inside lip). To figure the width of a steel, if the wheel was originally 5" in width, for a 13" wide wheel, the piece of 33-3/8" length sheet steel will need to be 8" wide (5" - 13" = 8"). If the wheel is originally 8-1/2" wide, the sheet steel will need to be 4-1/5" wide, etc. (8.5" - 13" = 4.5") The width of all wheels are always measured from the inside lip from one rim to the other. See picture to the right.

How to weld the flat steel to the drop-center section of the wheel halves:

  1. Large Slip RollerUse a large "slip roll" to roll or "curl" the sheet steel until they're about the same diameter as the drop-center section of the wheel halves.
  2. Tack weld one half of a wheel to a steel table top with the drop-center section facing up.
  3. Acquire a large diameter strap or band of some type to bring the ends of the sheet steel for the drop-center section together. Tack-weld the sheet steel to the wheel. Now slowly and carefully work around the wheel until the entire length of sheet steel is securely tack-welded to the wheel.
  4. Place the other matching half of the wheel on top of the drop-center section and tack-weld it until it's secured to the wheel.
  5. Now chuck each wheel in the lathe again, or on the rear of a garden tractor with axles/flanges that's not bent, and spin them to make sure they don't wobble (or wobble very little). If they turn true, weld solid the entire circumference of the sheet steel to the wheel halves.

If inner tubes are going to be used (which is recommended), grind the bead of weld smooth. But if they're going to be tubeless, grind off the "high spots" in the weld so the tire bead won't get damaged when mounting the tire on the wheel. NOTE: It's best to use inner tubes with welded-together wheels. Because if it's not a superior welding job, air can seep out through the weld bead. And as with any tubeless tire, it's best to sand smooth the inner rims on the wheel, paint the inside for lasting protection and then apply silicone sealant or "bead sealant" on the inside of the rim to prevent air leakage. If the tire slowly looses air over time, try some SLIME Flat Tire Repair. This stuff works great!


Advertisement: (Updated 8/9/16)
If you can't do it yourself or find someone locally to professionally widen your 12" diameter steel garden tractor wheels, contact:

A-1 Miller's Performance Enterprises | 1501 W. Old Plank Rd. | Columbia, MO 65203-9136 USA | Phone: 1-573-256-0313 (shop) | 1-573-881-7229 (cell). Please call Monday-Friday (except Holidays), 9am to 5pm, Central time zone. If no answer, please try again later. (When speaking with Brian, please be patient because I stutter.) A-1 Miller's shop is open to the public from 9am to 5pm, including weekends (except Holidays). Please call before coming so I'll be at my shop waiting for your arrival. Fax: 1-573-449-7347. E-mail: pullingtractor@aol.com. Directions to our shop | 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO - Google Maps or Map of 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO by MapQuest. If you're the kind of person who don't trust delivery/shipping companies (mis)handling your high-dollar and fragile merchandise, you can always make the long drive to A-1 Miller's shop to personally drop off and/or pick up your engine, transaxle, tractor, etc. "The road to a friend's house (or shop) is never long."


For YOUR two 12" wheels. Please indicate on wheels which side you want cut (offset), and how wide you want the wheels. NOTE - The width of all wheels are measured from inside bead to bead, not outside edge of rim! Wheels are professionally cut in two (split) and widened with a 3/32" thickness rolled steel band. They are welded and ready to clean and paint.
  • $125.00 for labor and steel bands per set of two wheels, plus return shipping & handling.


How to Manually Dismount a Tire from the Wheel, the Old-Fashioned Way -

DISCLAIMER: The below is how most older automotive service stations did it many years ago before the pneumatic tire changing machine was invented. It's the old-fashioned and manual way to mount and dismount tires. As long as you're careful, take your time, it still works great, especially with steel wheels. But if you don't feel comfortable using a hammer next to an expensive aluminum wheel, spend a few bucks and take them to a reputable automotive tire repair shop and have them mount or dismount the tires with a pneumatic tire changing machine. And if the tires are mounted tubeless, have the tire tech person apply plenty of tire mounting lubricant/sealant on both the tire bead and wheel rim for a leakproof seal. Otherwise, it may leak.

  1. Tools needed: manual bead breaker and tire changer, 3' long crowbar or pry bar, two large flat tire irons, medium to large size hammer, valve core tool and large Vise-Grips.
  2. Remove the valve core to fully deflate the tire if it isn't already.
  3. If it's a safety rim wheel, use the manual bead breaker and tire changer to break both tire beads down from the rims.
  4. Place the tire/wheel on the floor with the valve stem facing upward. (On most non-reversed or standard-offset wheels, this will place the drop center part of the wheel upward.) Place one foot on the sidewall (balance or brace yourself), then push down with the heel of your other foot from inside the wheel until the bead of the tire is in the drop center part of the wheel and at the same time, wedge one of the flat tire irons under the bead to pry one half of the tire off the wheel. May have to use the hammer to drive the tire iron under the bead. Use the tire irons to pry the bead to the outside of the rim until one side of the tire is on the outside of the wheel. Pry around the wheel until the entire one half of the tire is off the wheel.
  5. Stand the tire and wheel up (with the tread on the floor), position the tire between you and the wheel, with the wheel protruding outward.
  6. Place the flat end of the crowbar or pry bar on the inside of the rim that's closest to you, then push down until the sidewall is fully collapsed (use some muscle). This helps to remove the tire from the wheel while performing the next step.
  7. Now use the hammer to pound against the bead on each side of the tire (be careful not to hit the rim). The wheel should slip from the tire with each hit. Work your way down the bead on each side until the wheel falls to the floor. Move any air hoses, electrical cords, etc., out of the way of the falling wheel because the weight of the wheel (edge of rim) could damage anything in the way.

How to Manually Mount the Tire on a Wheel, the Old-Fashioned Way -

  1. First, make sure the floor you'll be working on, the tire, wheel and your shoes are absolutely clean!
  2. Install the valve core or a new valve stem in the wheel, and place the wheel flat on the floor with the valve stem facing upward. (On most wheels, this will place the drop center part of the wheel upward.)
  3. Apply tire mounting lubricant/sealant (motor oil or automotive lubricating grease will also work) on the entire bead of the tire and circumference of the rim.
  4. Place the tire on the wheel. (If it's a pulling/lug tire, make sure the tread is facing the right direction! Or if it's a white wall tire or tire with raised white letters, make sure it's installed on the wheel according to the owner's preference.)
  5. Stand on the tire (balance or brace yourself) and place one foot inside the lower bead until it hangs over the rim. Place your other foot on the sidewall to apply pressure (again, balance or brace yourself), then use the hammer between your legs to pound against the bead, and cautiously work around the wheel until the bead is completely inside the rim. Be careful not to damage (split) the bead! May have to use a flat tire iron to help the bead go in the rim easier. Large Vise-Grips clamped on the rim helps secure the bead under the edge of the rim until most of the bead is pounded in place under the rim.
  6. Inflate the tire to proper specs. Check for air leaks around the bead with soapy water. Bubbles will form if there's a leak. NOTE: If a lawn & garden or non-highway use tire leaks air through small cracks/splits on the sidewalls, or if a tire leaks air around the bead/rim due to a damaged bead or rust-pitted rim, but the tire has good tread, an inner tube can be installed and the tire should last a long time. Or if the tire slowly looses air over time, instead of an inner tube, try some SLIME Flat Tire Repair. This stuff works great!

Use a small manual bead breaker tool for smaller pneumatic tires, such as on the front of riding mowers, garden tractor or go-kart tires to remove the tire from the wheel. Google search for this tool or find it on eBay.

A bigger manual bead breaker and tire changer for changing rear garden tractor and automotive or light truck tires is available from Harbor Freight Tools. This high quality and handy shop tool works great for bigger tires. For more information on this quality tool from Harbor Freight Tools, it's item number 69686 (Take advantage of Harbor Freight's Money Saving Coupons, Coupon Codes, & Promo Codes!) or find it on eBay. For stability of this tool, fasten it to a concrete floor or on a wide, heavy steel plate with hardened bolts. YouTube video: How to Use a Manual Tire Changer - Harbor Freight - YouTube.


Patching a Pin Hole in an Inner Tube -

Inner TubePurchase an inner tube patch kit. Before you smear the sealant on the tube, be sure to thoroughly clean the area first with cleaning solvent, and light the sealant with a match, let it burn for a few seconds, blow it out and then apply the patch. Use the roller to secure it in place. This is called hot patching. It holds the patch in place better.

When sharpening the tread on a pulling tire, sometimes the grinding disc will cut through the cords of the tire, creating a hole in the tread area of the tire. When this happens, all hope for the [expensive] tire is not lost. Simply have a tire repair shop install a boot, which is a large, thick patch, over the cut place on the inside of the tire and then install an inner tube in the tire. The purpose of "boot" repair is to fix a tear in the tread.


By the way - most people call wheels "rims." This is wrong! A rim is the outer part or edge of a wheel that holds the tire bead in place. And a "wheel" is the whole thing, including the rim and center section.

Webster's dictionary defines the word Rim as:
Rim (noun)
[Middle English, from Old English rima; akin to Old Norse rimi strip of land] First appeared 13th Century
1: the outer often curved or circular edge or border of something
2: the outer part of a wheel joined to the hub usually by spokes
3: a removable outer metal band on an automobile wheel to which the tire is attached.

Also see: Rim (wheel) (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)


Pit Bull II Is On The Loose!

You Can Really Tear Up the Competition with the Pit Bull II Pulling Tire!

Original Pit Bull Pulling Tire:
Original Pit Bull pulling tire


Free Pit Bull II tire sticker:
Free Pit Bull Sticker

Beware of the Dog Pit Bull II tires are completely different from the Original. Improved features include:
  • 26-12.00x12 4 ply Puller tire
  • U.S. Patent no. D461,764
  • 32 Chevron Bars Staggered 1/4". Cut tread design is molded into each tire.
  • Reinforced corners and the tip of the bars are staggered 1/4" and have off-set tread with 1/2"+ tread depth.
  • Tread height: 1/2", 85" average circumference. / 12" wide tread, 33.5 lbs. average weight each, No hardening necessary.
  • Tread Height: 1/2". Full 12" tread width footprint. Tire is designed so the entire width of the tread lays flat on the ground, even with more than enough air pressure.
  • Extra hard rubber compound. Which means no hardening or sharpening required - they're ready to pull!
  • Flexible sidewalls. Sidewalls are designed to bulge out instead of wrinkle which allows the tire to maintain constant forward force while also allowing the tire to lie fully flat thus creating the most footprint while also having the necessary pressure to force the tire forward.
  • 1-1/4" height difference from center of crown to edge of tread when inflated to 7 p.s.i.
  • Tough tread. Excellent for high tire speed garden tractors and small wheel (26-12.00x26 tires) mini-rods with an automotive engine!
  • Click here for more information regarding Pit Bull tire products and dealer locations.
  • Contact The Original Tire Mart, 1815 Locust St., Saint Louis, MO 63103 | (314) 621-8954. They can put you in touch with your nearest Pit Bull tire dealer.

Email Tire Mart below for the nearest Pit Bull II tire dealer in your area and for prices. Ê
The Original Tire Mart (e-mail link)


Suppliers of quality 12" diameter x 12" wide aluminum garden tractor pulling wheels are: Douglas Wheels, VM (both made in China) and Keizer Wheels (made in USA). Here's the similarities and differences between Douglas and VM wheels...

  • VM cost less than Douglas.
  • Douglas and VM have the same offsets and look similar.
  • VM have slightly thicker metal than Douglas.
  • Douglas weigh about 5 lbs. and VM weigh about 6-1/2 lbs.
  • Douglas and VM have the same size mounting holes (7/16").
  • VM have a deeper rim bead lock to seal the tire better than Douglas.


To make it easier to mount wheels on the rear of a garden tractor, there are three ways to install studs in the axle flanges:

Only on tractors with an internal brake:

Only on tractors with external disc brakes:

By installing studs to mount the wheels, ordinary, chrome-plated or stainless steel tapered-seat automotive lug nuts can be used to secure the wheels. To use lug nuts with steel garden tractor wheels, drill the mounting holes to 21/32" diameter, to make up the difference because of the larger taper that's on the automotive lug nuts. Any hardware store should carry a 21/32" drill bit. No other size bit will allow the lug nuts to seat properly, keep them tight and keep the wheel centered. But for aluminum wheels that have 1/2" mounting holes, drill the holes in the axle flanges larger and install a set of 1/2-20 (fine thread) bolts or studs and matching lug nuts to keep the wheels centered with the axles.

Front Wheel Bushings/Bearings, Front Tires, Front Wheels, Inner Tubes and Wheelie Bar Wheels -
If you need any of the parts or services listed below Ê, please contact A-1 Miller's Performance Enterprises | 1501 W. Old Plank Rd. | Columbia, MO 65203-9136 USA | Phone: 1-573-256-0313 (shop) | 1-573-881-7229 (cell). Please call Monday-Friday (except Holidays), 9am to 5pm, Central time zone. If no answer, please try again later. (When speaking with Brian, please be patient because I stutter.) A-1 Miller's shop is open to the public from 9am to 5pm, including weekends (except Holidays). Please call before coming so I'll be here waiting for your arrival. Fax: 1-573-449-7347. E-mail: pullingtractor@aol.com. Directions to our shop | 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO - Google Maps or Map of 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO by MapQuest. Please click here to place an order. If you're the kind of person who don't trust delivery/shipping companies (mis)handling your high-dollar and fragile merchandise, you can always make the long drive to A-1 Miller's shop to personally drop off and/or pick up your engine, transaxle, tractor, etc. "The road to a friend's house (or shop) is never long."
Grease (Zerk) Fittings. Use a 1/4-28 UNF hand tap to cut new threads for installation of a new fitting. Click here to learn how to cut new threads, the professional way.
  • Straight fitting. Short length; use for steering ends/joints, etc. 1/4-28 UNF threads x 35/64" length x 5/16" hex. Replaces Cub Cadet part # 737-3001. .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • Straight fitting. Longer length; use in wheel hubs to lubricate bushings or bearings. 1/4-28 UNF threads x 11/16" length x 5/16" hex. Replaces Cub Cadet part # 737-3001. .50¢ each, plus shipping & handling.
  • 45º fitting. 1/4-28 UNF threads x 5/16" hex. Replaces Cub Cadet part # IH-273360. $1.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • 90º fitting. 1/4-28 UNF threads x 5/16" hex. .75¢ each, plus shipping & handling. Return To Previous Section
Heavy duty, oil-impregnated metal graphite flange wheel bushing. Universal fit. Dimensions: 3/4" i.d. x 1-3/8" o.d. x 9/16" width (1/2" fits inside the wheel hub), flange o.d. is 1-1/2". Oil impregnated means the hardened metal is porous to absorb oil and grease so it will last longer. The oil acts as a cushion between the bearing and shaft, adding resistance to wear. These last a long time as long as they're lubricated with quality automotive lubricating grease regularly. If there is no grease (Zerk) fitting in the hub of the wheel, then one will need to be installed. Our part # 09-3305-3/4.
  • $3.50 each, plus shipping & handling.

Heavy duty, oil-impregnated metal graphite flange wheel bushing for the IH Cub Cadet "Original" with 7/8" diameter front spindle shafts and 1-3/8" inside diameter wheels. Dimensions: 7/8" i.d. x 1-3/8" o.d. x 9/16" width (1/2" fits inside the wheel hub), flange o.d. is 1-1/2". Oil impregnated means the hardened metal is porous to absorb oil and grease so it will last longer. The oil acts as a cushion between the bushing and shaft, adding resistance to wear. These last a long time as long as they're lubricated with quality automotive lubricating grease once a year. If there is no grease (Zerk) fitting in the hub of the wheel, then one will need to be installed. These are the same as above except being there are no bearings or bushings this size available from any source besides Cub Cadet, I bore them to 7/8" in my metal lathe. Replaces Cub Cadet part # IH-384881-R94. Our part # 09-3305-7/8.

  • $32.00 set of 4, plus shipping & handling.

Heavy duty, oil-impregnated metal graphite flanged wheel bushing for Cub Cadets with 1" diameter front spindle shafts and 1-3/8" inside diameter wheels/hubs. Dimensions: 1" i.d. x 1-3/8" o.d. x 1" wide x 1-1/2" o.d. flange. For Cub Cadet models 1000, 1100, 1200, 1250, 1450, 1650, 1210, 1282, 680, 1512, 882, 782-D, 1604, 1606, 580, 582, 1710, 682, 1711, 1712, 782, 784, 482, 1050, 1204, 1210, 1211, 1806, 1810, 1811, 1812 with serial # 632502 and above. Oil impregnated means the hardened metal is porous to absorb oil and grease so it will last longer. The oil acts as a cushion between the bushing and shaft, adding resistance to wear. These last a long time as long as they're lubricated with quality automotive lubricating grease once a year. If there is no grease (Zerk) fitting in the hub of the wheel, then one will need to be installed. These are the same as above except being there are no bearings or bushings this size available from any source, I bore them to 1" in my metal lathe. Our part # 09-3305-1.

  • $32.00 set of 4, plus shipping & handling.

Flanged wheel bearings. Dimensions: 3/4" i.d. x 1-3/8" O.D. x 1/2" width (3/8" fits inside wheel hub) x 1-1/2" O.D. flange. Universal fit. Each fits Cub Cadet, Wheel Horse, Sears Suburban and many other makes and models of garden tractors. Also ideal for small wheel mini-rods with 3/4" front spindle shafts. These have hardened, heated-treated steel races and roller balls, sealed on both sides and pre-packed with grease so they will last longer. These are NOT the low quality wheel bearings found in most hardware stores!

  • Heavy duty, high quality aftermarket. Will hold up to a lot of weight and rough abuse. Our part # 150-020. $8.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Cub Cadet part # IH-384881-R94. $17.10 each, plus shipping & handling.

Flanged wheel bearings. Dimensions: 1" i.d. x 2" O.D. x 9/16" width (1/2" fits inside wheel hub), flange O.D. is 2-1/8". Fits Cub Cadet models 1000, 1100, 1200, 1250, 1450, 1650, 1210, 1282, 680, 1512, 882, 782-D, 1604, 1606, 580, 582, 1710, 682, 1711, 1712, 782, 784, 482, 1050, 1204, 1210, 1211, 1806, 1810, 1811, 1812 with serial # 632502 and above. Also fits Cub Cadet GT2000, GT2042, GT2050, GT2100, GT2148, GTX2154 and GTX2154LE with 1" spindles. And ideal for mini-rods with 1" front spindle shafts. These have hardened, heated-treated steel races and roller balls, sealed on both sides and pre-packed with grease so they will last longer.

  • Heavy duty, high quality aftermarket. Will hold up to a lot of weight and rough abuse. Our part # 150-023. $8.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
  • OEM Cub Cadet part # 941-3002. $23.70 each, plus shipping & handling.

Other sizes and styles of bearings and bushings are available. Please let me know what you need and I can probably get it for you at a reasonable price.

NOTE: Other sizes and styles of bearings and bushings are available. Please let us know what you need and I can probably get it for you at a reasonable price.
4.10/3.50-4 Heavy Duty, Flat-Free Tire and Wheel Assembly.

Features: Puncture resistant! Shock-absorbing! Zero down time! Never needs inflating! Less weight than standard 3-piece pneumatic tire and wheel assemblies. Excellent resistance to abrasion, water absorption, and chemical attacks. Maintains low rolling resistance. Double-sealed, semi-precision 3/4" ball bearings that offer higher wear resistance, quiet and smooth operation. Pre-greased to extend bearing life. Specifications: 10.2" diameter x 3.2" wide. Tire weight load capacity: 350 lbs.

  • $80.00 per pair, plus shipping & handling.
4.10x3.50-4 Sawtooth Tread 2-Ply Tubeless Tire. Fully inflated dimensions: 4.1" width of sidewall bulge x 11" overall height x 4" rim diameter. Each tire weighs 2.8 lbs. Load capacity for each tire is 260 lbs @ 30 psi. (maximum inflation). Made by Carlisle. Proportional size to the 23-10.50x12 rear tires.
  • $33.00 set of two, plus shipping & handling.

4.10-6 Sawtooth Tread 4-Ply Tubeless Tire. Fully inflated dimensions: 4.1" width of sidewall bulge x 13" overall height x 6" rim diameter. Each tire weighs 3.1 lbs. Load capacity for each tire is 485 lbs. @ 85 psi. (maximum inflation). Made by Carlisle. Proportional size to the 26-12.00x12 rear tires.

  • $70.00 set of two, plus shipping & handling.
11x400-5 Rib Tread 2-Ply Tubeless Tire. Fully inflated dimensions: 11" overall height x 4" width of sidewall bulge x 5" rim diameter. Each tire weighs 3.5 lbs. Load capacity for each tire is 210 lbs. @ 22 psi. (maximum inflation). Made by Cheng Shin. "In-between" proportional size to the 23-10.50x12 or 26-12.00x12 rear tires.
  • $28.00 set of two, plus shipping & handling.

13x500-6 Rib Tread 2-Ply Tubeless Tire. Fully inflated dimensions: 11" overall height x 4" width of sidewall bulge x 6" rim diameter. Each tire weighs 4.5 lbs. Load capacity for each tire is 295 lbs. @ 20 psi. (maximum inflation). Made by Cheng Shin. Proportional size to the 26-12.00x12 rear tires.

  • $33.00 set of two, plus shipping & handling.
Two-Piece, Bolt-Together Steel Wheels for Easier Mounting and Dismounting, 4" wheel. Painted white. Dimensions: 4" diameter x 2-1/2" rim width x 2-1/8" wide centered hub. (Cub Cadet front spindles are 3" length, so a 3/4" spacer will need to be used with this wheel.) Two wheels weighs 4.2 lbs. Accepts 1-3/8" o.d. bearings or bushings (not included); use with inner tube.
  • $42.00 set of two, plus shipping & handling.

Two-Piece, Bolt-Together Steel Wheels for Easier Mounting and Dismounting. 6" wheel. Painted white. Dimensions: 5" diameter x 2-3/4" rim width x 3-1/2" wide centered hub. (Cub Cadet front spindles are 3" length, so a 3/4" spacer will need to be used with this wheel.) Two wheels weighs 5.2 lbs. Accepts 1-3/8" o.d. bearings or bushings (not included); use with inner tube.

  • $60.00 set of two, plus shipping & handling.

Two-Piece, Bolt-Together Steel Wheels for Easier Mounting and Dismounting. 6" wheel. Painted white. Dimensions: 6" diameter x 3-1/4" rim width x 3-1/2" wide centered hub. (Cub Cadet front spindles are 3" length, so a 3/4" spacer will need to be used with this wheel.) Two wheels weighs 6.2 lbs. Accepts 1-3/8" o.d. bearings or bushings (not included); use with inner tube.

  • $60.00 set of two, plus shipping & handling.
Inner tube w/straight valve stem for 4" tire and wheel. Made by Cheng Shin.
  • $5.00 each, plus shipping & handling.

Inner tube w/straight valve stem for 5" tire and wheel. Made by Cheng Shin.

  • $5.50 each, plus shipping & handling.

Inner tube w/straight valve stem for 6" tire and wheel. Made by Cheng Shin.

  • $6.00 each, plus shipping & handling.
Heavy Duty Plastic Wheelie Bar Wheels with smooth tread surface. Weighs less than 10 ounces each. Lighter in weight than all-aluminum wheels or steel wheels w/rubber tread, but just as strong. Dimensions: 5" tall x 1-3/8" wide x 1/2" center hole w/metal bushing. Our part # 84-1061.
  • $8.00 per pair, plus shipping & handling.
Wheel Stud Kit for IH-built Cub Cadet with an internal (wet) brake. But will work on other makes and models of garden tractors as well. 7/16-20 UNF x 1-1/2" thread length. For use with no wheel spacers. These are grade 8 bolts that act as studs when installed from the backside in the flanges. Along with lug nuts (below Ê), these make for much easier mounting of wheels on a garden tractor. NOTE: Not for tractors with external brake disc welded to axle. An original, ingenious and innovative concept by Brian Miller.
  • $10.00 per set of 10, plus shipping and handling.
Wheel Stud Kits for IH-built Cub Cadets with an internal (wet) brake or external axle/disc brakes. But will work on other makes and models of garden tractors as well. 7/16-20 NF size. Along with lug nuts (below Ê), these make for easier mounting of wheels with or without spacers on a garden tractor. Made of 125,000 PSI hardened alloy all-thread steel rods that act as studs and secured from the backside in the flanges with jam nuts. Each set includes 10 studs and 10 jam nuts. Replaces Cub Cadet part # 710-3027. An original, ingenious and innovative concept by Brian Miller. Accept no copycat parts!
  • 1-5/8" length for use with no wheel spacers. $20.00 per set, plus shipping & handling.
  • 2" length for use with 5/16" wheel spacers. $22.50 per set, plus shipping & handling.
  • 3-5/8" length for use with 1" wheel spacers. $25.00 per set, plus shipping & handling.
Automotive Wheel Lug Studs for MTD-built Cub Cadet 30mm Fine Spline Axles. Convert OEM Cub Cadet 7/16-14 NC coarse thread studs to automotive 7/16-20 NF fine thread studs so nice looking chrome acorn lug nuts below Ê can be used. OEM brake discs can be reused with these studs. Made of extremely hardened steel. Install with a 1/2" impact wrench with grade 8 nut and flat washer/spacer. Replaces Cub Cadet part # 710-0852.
  • $20.00 per set of 10, plus shipping & handling.
Stainless Steel Plain Nuts and Flat Washers for Mounting of Douglas or VM Aluminum Wheels. 7/16-20 NF thread size. Along with studs (above È), these make for easier mounting of wheels on a garden tractor. The flat washers allow for equal load distribution across the wheel for additional strength, and they prevent the socket from marking the wheel. Torque to 50 ft. lbs.
  • $15.00 per set of 10, plus shipping & handling.
Zinc-Plated Tapered Lug/Wheel Nuts for Mounting of Steel Wheels. 7/16-20 NF thread size. Along with studs (above È), these make for easier mounting of wheels on a garden tractor. Torque to 50 ft. lbs. NOTE: The mounting holes in steel garden tractor wheels will need to be drilled (enlarged) to 21/32" to allow for these lug nuts to tighten properly and keep the wheel centered with the axle.
  • $15.00 per set of 10, plus shipping & handling.
Chrome Acorn Closed-End Tapered Lug/Wheel Nuts for Mounting of Steel Wheels. 7/16-20 NF thread size. Along with studs (above È), these make for easier mounting of wheels on a garden tractor. NOTE: The mounting holes in steel garden tractor wheels will need to be drilled (enlarged) to 21/32" to allow for these lug nuts to tighten properly and keep the wheel centered with the axle. Torque to 50 ft. lbs.
  • $25.00 per set of 10, plus shipping & handling.


Advertisement:
If you wish to have your Kohler stock or pulling engine tested on a dynamometer (dyno), please contact A-1 Miller's Performance Enterprises | 1501 W. Old Plank Rd. | Columbia, MO 65203-9136 USA | Phone: 1-573-256-0313 (shop) | 1-573-881-7229 (cell). Please call Monday-Friday (except Holidays), 9am to 5pm, Central time zone. If no answer, please try again later. (When speaking with Brian, please be patient because I stutter.) A-1 Miller's shop is open to the public from 9am to 5pm, including weekends (except Holidays). Please call before coming so I'll be here waiting for your arrival. Fax: 1-573-449-7347. E-mail: pullingtractor@aol.com. Directions to our shop | 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO - Google Maps or Map of 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO by MapQuest. If you're the kind of person who don't trust delivery/shipping companies (mis)handling your high-dollar and fragile merchandise, you can always make the long drive to A-1 Miller's shop to personally drop off and/or pick up your engine, transaxle, tractor, etc. "The road to a friend's house (or shop) is never long."

A-1 Miller's Fully Computerized Stuska Water Brake Engine Dynamometer (Dyno) Service!

For performance testing engines up to 200hp at speeds up to 12,000 RPM. The only engine dyno service in Missouri for Kohler pulling engines! Now set up and fully operational, customers can rent dyno time, fine tune and make adjustments or changes to their engines for maximum horsepower and torque, and print-out the results so their tractor(s) will be truly competitive on the track.

Engine Dyno Rental Fee: $30.00 per hour run time from the moment the engine is started. No setup fee for Cub Cadet engines with a 3- or 6-pin/stud clutch driver. An adapter may need to be needed or fabricated for other makes and models of engines. Only engines with the narrow base oil pan can be tested. Engines with the wide base (tall) oil pan cannot be tested at this time.


To place an order and/or for technical assistance, please contact:

A-1 Miller's Performance Enterprises | 1501 W. Old Plank Rd. | Columbia, MO 65203-9136 USA | Phone: 1-573-256-0313 (shop) | 1-573-881-7229 (cell). Please call Monday-Friday (except Holidays), 9am to 5pm, Central time zone. If no answer, please try again later. (When speaking with Brian, please be patient because I stutter.) A-1 Miller's shop is open to the public from 9am to 5pm, including weekends (except Holidays). Please call before coming so I'll be here waiting for your arrival. Fax: 1-573-449-7347. E-mail: pullingtractor@aol.com. Directions to our shop | 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO - Google Maps or Map of 1501 West Old Plank Road, Columbia, MO by MapQuest. If you're the kind of person who don't trust delivery/shipping companies (mis)handling your high-dollar and fragile merchandise, you can always make the long drive to A-1 Miller's shop to personally drop off and/or pick up your engine, transaxle, tractor, etc. "The road to a friend's house (or shop) is never long."

To place an order, please call the number below Ê or send an email with your name, complete and correct postal address and phone number and so I can figure the total with shipping cost and USPS Tracking. For payment, I accept cash (in person), Postal money orders or cashier's checks made out in my name, MasterCard, VISA, Discover, American Express and Western Union Money Transfer. (If a part for a specific purpose is special ordered, your debit/credit card may be charged for the full amount or as a deposit right after your order is placed; please do not send your debit/credit card information in email!) Or you can pay me through PayPal. (My PayPal account name is my email address. And be sure to mention in PayPal a description of what the payment is for.) If sending a money order, please include a note in the envelope with your name, complete and correct postal address, phone number and a description of what the payment is for. My mailing address and phone number are below Ê . I'll make a note of your order, and I may have to order some of the parts, which should take a few days to come in, but I will send the parts to you as soon as I have everything in stock after I receive your payment.

IMPORTANT - When sending your part(s) to me for rebuilding or repair, package everything securely so the item(s) won't get damaged in shipping and please include a note in the box with your name, mailing address, phone number (in case I have any questions) and a description of what you want done. When shipping heavy parts, it's best to put a slightly smaller box inside a larger box, to double the strength and integrity of the package. Because the clumsy "gorillas" or incompetent and uncaring workers that work for certain delivery services mishandle the heavy packages and don't care. And when the work is completed, I'll either call or email you an invoice with the total including shipping and handling.

To figure the shipping cost, I weigh the package with the parts, then I go online to the USPS Postage Rate Calculator website. I type in the weight, my zip code and your zip code, then it shows me the prices for various ways to ship the package. I always choose US Postal Service because I believe that's the most fastest, economical and reliable method.

Shipping: (United States and it's territories)
To save you shipping charges, item(s) in a package or cushioned envelope weighing less than 13 oz. is sent by First Class Mail for a 2-6 day delivery. Most packaged item(s) weighing over 13 oz. is sent by US Priority Mail for a 2-3 day delivery. To save you even more on shipping heavy items, I always try to use the US Postal Services' Flat Rate Priority Mail envelope and boxes (if the item(s) can fit inside the envelope or boxes). Some heavy items weighing no more than 70 lbs. is sent by US Mail Parcel Post. Item(s) weighing over 70 lbs. is sent by FedEx Ground. Again, if you're the kind of person who don't trust delivery/shipping companies (mis)handling your high-dollar and fragile merchandise, you can always make the long drive to A-1 Miller's shop to personally drop off and/or pick up your engine, transaxle, tractor, etc.

Ship to Canada and Worldwide þüý -
Item(s) in a package or cushioned envelope weighing less than 1 lb. is sent by US Postal Service Airmail Letter Post for a 4-7 days delivery. Packaged item(s) weighing over 1 lb. and up to 66 lb. is sent by US Postal Service Airmail Parcel Post for a 4-10 days delivery. I cannot use the US Postal Services' Flat Rate Priority Mail envelopes and boxes to ship outside U.S. territories. Item(s) weighing over 67 lbs. or more is sent by FedEx Ground or equivalent services.


Official PayPal Seal We Accept PayPal, Visa, MasterCard, American Express & Discover Credit & Debit Cards Western Union - Send Money - Money Transfer - Find Location - Transfer Money
(When placing an order through PayPal, please provide a list of which parts you need.)

To make a payment to me through PayPal, go to PayPal's secure website ( https://www.paypal.com/ ) and click on Send and Request -> Pay for goods or services. Type in my email address, or copy and paste this: pullingtractor@aol.com, the amount and follow the directions. Be sure to mention in PayPal a description of what the payment is for. After you've finished, PayPal will send me an email notifying me that you have made a payment to me for the product(s) or services and amount entered. Then I go to their website and direct PayPal to deposit the money in my bank account. And I will send the parts to you as soon as I receive your payment. But I may have to order some of the parts if they're not in stock, which should take a few days. In that case, I will send you the parts as soon as they come in. PayPal protects your financial privacy and security. With PayPal, privacy is built in. It's a way for you to pay without exposing their financial information.


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